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Forum topic by colleend posted 02-06-2014 10:58 AM 849 views 0 times favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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colleend

2 posts in 1032 days


02-06-2014 10:58 AM

Topic tags/keywords: walnut

hello…I just acquired 2 beautiful slabs of black walnut….logging man gave them to me after her cut down the tree…I have no idea how to preserve these georgous pieces of wood…they are going to be my first project for end tables…BUT I DON’T EVEN KNOW WHERE TO START….they look like they are bleeding some sap or something….I need all the help and knowledge you can share,,,thank you sooo much…


12 replies so far

View Kaleb the Swede's profile

Kaleb the Swede

1727 posts in 1431 days


#1 posted 02-06-2014 12:31 PM

Colleen, if they were cut recently they are going to need a while to dry. Usually it is a year per inch, you didn’t mention how thick they were. Otherwise you can try to find somebody who can kiln dry them for you. Just hold onto them, you will figure it out. Hope this helps.

-- Just trying to build something beautiful

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mahdee

3550 posts in 1229 days


#2 posted 02-06-2014 12:46 PM

Hi,
keep them off the ground with spacers every 2’ at the base and in between the two. As Kaleb said, you will have plenty of time to decide how to turn them to tables.

-- earthartandfoods.com

View WDHLT15's profile

WDHLT15

1572 posts in 1937 days


#3 posted 02-06-2014 01:12 PM

Buy some canning wax, melt it down, and paint the ends to reduce checks and splitting.

-- Danny Located in Perry, GA. Forester. Wood-Mizer LT40HD35 Sawmill. Nyle L53 Dehumidification Kiln. hamsleyhardwood.com

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yee

5 posts in 1032 days


#4 posted 02-06-2014 01:22 PM

I am just getting into woodworking and wondering what is the best way to get the lumber I need. I have the ability plane rough cut. I do see the stuff at Lowes and Homedepot but that can get expensive. I live between DC Richmond and I was wondring if anybody knows were I can get some rough cut lumber. I have been looking on the internet but not sure how much I trust some of the people since there isn’t much feedback.

Wally

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WDHLT15

1572 posts in 1937 days


#5 posted 02-06-2014 09:43 PM

Contact Dave at http://www.gotlogs.biz/

He is a good dude, and he has a kiln.

-- Danny Located in Perry, GA. Forester. Wood-Mizer LT40HD35 Sawmill. Nyle L53 Dehumidification Kiln. hamsleyhardwood.com

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colleend

2 posts in 1032 days


#6 posted 02-06-2014 10:39 PM

OK HERE’S THE STUPID QUESTION OF THE DAY WHAT ARE SPACERS OR WHAT KIND OF SPACERS DO I USE….I KNOW SPACERS THAT ARE USED IN TILE WORK…BUT I DON’T WANT TO USE SOMETHING THAT IS GOING TO MARK THE WOOD…BY THE WAY THEY ARE 2’’ THICK….CAN I KEEP THEM IN MY GARAGE AGAINST THE WALL FOR A YEAR????THEY ARE JUST SOO BEAUTIFUL …I DON’T WANNA SCREW THEM UP….AND YES KALEB THEY WERE JUST CUT….
THANKX SOO MUCH FOR THE RESPONSES….GIVES ME A START….

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Ocelot

1470 posts in 2099 days


#7 posted 02-06-2014 11:07 PM

There are more experienced voices here, but I’ll have a go.

You want them to be flat when they have finished drying. So, you have to keep them flat while they are drying.

Make sure you start on a level surface. If drying indoors, still you want to get the bottom slab up off the floor a little. For that, you’ll want something that supports the wood at regular intervals (every 2 ft or so) and keeps it flat, and up off the floor a couple of inches. The goal is to keep the pieces flat while allowing air to circulate around them. Also, the ends tend to dry faster – which will cause the wood to split at the ends. So, you need to coat the ends with something that will limit drying. Some people just use any available paint – latex or oil-based. Others use wax or special stuff sold for that. The ends will always split some anyway. You just want to limit it as much as possible.

You get some wood you don’t care much about and cut it into 3/4” square sticks. Folks call these “stickers”. Use these for separating the two slabs while they dry – to let air circulate between them.

If you are drying them “against the wall” as you wrote, you’ll want to make sure it’s not right smack dab against the wall – to allow air to circulate between the edges of the slabs and the wall.

Good luck.

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ex-member

186 posts in 1236 days


#8 posted 02-06-2014 11:31 PM

I don’t know if this really helps or not but my grandfather always stacked the green wood under a bunch of not so green wood in the back of his shop. He told me the weight helped stop the wood from twisting. He had a nice big stack of slabs back there all separated with sticks. I honestly don’t know if he just did it to put the green stuff at the bottom because it wasn’t going to get used soon and so put it out of the way, if he had some experience with it working or if it was just to keep me busy stacking wood and out of his way. Still it makes some sense to me.

View mahdee's profile

mahdee

3550 posts in 1229 days


#9 posted 02-06-2014 11:31 PM

Best type of spacers are milled stuff. If you are putting them in your garage, use 2×4’s at the bottom to create a space from the concrete and the wood. The spacers between the lumbers can be plywood 1/2 inch wide. DC/Richmond area has fairy dry summers which is a plus for seasoning wood. Comes Spring and Summer, allow for some draft to be created in the garage by having a window opened. You can even put them up vertically against a wall at 15-22 degrees in the house and it should do just fine and dry a lot faster in winter. Hope to see some pictures soon.

-- earthartandfoods.com

View WDHLT15's profile

WDHLT15

1572 posts in 1937 days


#10 posted 02-07-2014 03:02 AM

All good advice, especially the last three posts. Slabs that thick need to dry slow. They need to be end sealed because the ends dry much fastger, and that sets up stress, which results in cracks, splits, and checks. The end sealer slows the drying on the ends. The paraffin wax is relatively cost effective. You can buy it at the Grocery Store in the canning section. Paint works poorly. Commercial end sealer is expensive in small quantities.

You are lucky in that walnut dries well. Thick oak is another story. It would be best to be outside under a covered shed until the moisture content reaches 25 – 30%. Then you could bring it inside for faster drying. If a garage is all that you have, then Ocelot and mrjinx007 have very good advice. Like oldsaxon points out, weight on the slabs helps, but make sure there is a line of stickers on top of the topmost slab to create an airflow space if you put weight on the slabs.

-- Danny Located in Perry, GA. Forester. Wood-Mizer LT40HD35 Sawmill. Nyle L53 Dehumidification Kiln. hamsleyhardwood.com

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a1Jim

115202 posts in 3038 days


#11 posted 02-07-2014 05:16 AM

I agree seal the ends with some house paint ,then stack them with stickers as others have suggested ,if your putting them on a concrete floor put roofing felt(tar paper) under the stickers first and then the wood this helps keep the moisture in the concrete from infiltrating your wood(concrete always holds moisture,unless it’s in direct sunlight and you live in Arizona some were and I know you don’t. Some types of wood will leave marks on your walnut soif you have some 3/4” strips of walnut that’s the safest way to go.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View Ocelot's profile

Ocelot

1470 posts in 2099 days


#12 posted 02-07-2014 11:06 PM

Green lumber has a lot of water in it. mrjinx007’s suggestion to open a window makes sense. A man I know put a lot of wood to dry in his shop one time and 2 days later the whole place was covered with mildew. That seems less likely with a small amount of wood, but if you have a way to measure the humidity in the air, it makes sense to check. You need the air to stay lower than 70% to avoid mildew, and lower than 60% would be better.

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