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Forum topic by PASs posted 02-04-2014 03:42 PM 885 views 0 times favorited 17 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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PASs

571 posts in 1823 days


02-04-2014 03:42 PM

Topic tags/keywords: turning lathe powermatic 3520b powermatic 3520b question pndselling

The boss, er wife, let me get a new lathe a couple years ago, a Powermatic 3520b.
After a Craftsman tube-type lathe, it was a tremendous step up, big, heavy, quiet, smooth, variable speed, reversible.
I am curious how many turners running reversible lathes work from the ‘back’ side of the lathe.
I find it is sometimes very handy.
Thanks for your feedback.
Pete

-- Pete, "It isn't broken, you just aren't using it right."


17 replies so far

View William's profile

William

9223 posts in 1567 days


#1 posted 02-04-2014 05:07 PM

I don’t know about the reversible part (mine is not) but I usually hollow bowls standing on the backside of the lathe.
I’ve been told that this is dangerous because I have to reach across the headstock for the off switch.
With my back problems though, it is the only way I can handle working longer than a few minutes without my back killing me while hollowing.

-- http://wddsrfinewoodworks.blogspot.com/

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PASs

571 posts in 1823 days


#2 posted 02-04-2014 05:26 PM

William, Don’t know what your lathe is but I put my control panel on a 12 foot cable.
Here’s the blog it.

-- Pete, "It isn't broken, you just aren't using it right."

View hairy's profile

hairy

2099 posts in 2257 days


#3 posted 02-04-2014 05:41 PM

I like it for spindles. I’m better working right to left, so I stand on the other side and run the motor the other way. I can put my control box wherever I need it.

-- in the confusion, I mighta grabbed the gold ...

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Jimbo4

1160 posts in 1487 days


#4 posted 02-04-2014 05:44 PM

Depends on being left handed – I guess ? I normally work from the front (right handed) side – but – also turn in reverse. When turning in reverse I am normally using a scraper, that way I get the best of both directions of the wood.

-- *Arachnoleptic Fit*: The frantic dance performed just after you've accidently walked through a spider web.

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Mip

334 posts in 803 days


#5 posted 02-04-2014 05:58 PM

I have access to a Powermatic 4224 lathe which has a reversible motor on it, which comes in handy when sanding since sometimes the wood fibers “lay down” in one direction when sanding and I run it the other way to “break” the fibers which gives me a smoother finish. I don’t turn when the motor is reversed because I have to think differently, in which my feeble mind can’t handle it. To sand on the other side of the lathe is no big deal since I’m just sanding and not cutting. The reverse setup did get me once. Somebody left it in reverse mode and when I went to turn a lamp base, the chisel would not cut. It took me awhile to figure it out. Duh.
I would like to claim the lathe as mine to one up you, but I just have access to it and don’t own it, so your still safe with your tool gloat, PASs. Those are nice lathes.

View TheDane's profile

TheDane

3938 posts in 2388 days


#6 posted 02-04-2014 06:51 PM

I have done some hollowing work on bowls running in reverse … that keeps me on the side of the lathe with the headstock on the left. I just swing the banjo around and re-position the tool rest.

-- Gerry -- "I don't plan to ever really grow up ... I'm just going to learn how to act in public!"

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davidmackv

314 posts in 372 days


#7 posted 02-04-2014 08:20 PM

I know some guys who do that because they are left handed.

View hairy's profile

hairy

2099 posts in 2257 days


#8 posted 02-04-2014 08:49 PM

I wouldn’t try a chuck without set screws to lock it in place.

-- in the confusion, I mighta grabbed the gold ...

View moke's profile

moke

538 posts in 1501 days


#9 posted 02-04-2014 09:02 PM

+1 with Gerry…..but the lathe is not running backwards….it is in effort to “see” inside the vessel better.
Mike

View PASs's profile

PASs

571 posts in 1823 days


#10 posted 02-04-2014 11:16 PM

Hairy,
I found it isn’t enough to have set screws.
You have to tighten them.
Thank should go in the I’m an idiot forum.

-- Pete, "It isn't broken, you just aren't using it right."

View Kryptic's profile

Kryptic

294 posts in 385 days


#11 posted 02-05-2014 12:33 AM

I thought about this question, and then having read all the answers, will forever leave me in the realm of the little I know about lathes : (

and the passion to learn : )

View Jimbo4's profile

Jimbo4

1160 posts in 1487 days


#12 posted 02-05-2014 04:44 AM

Kryptic: That passion will be addictive ! :o)

-- *Arachnoleptic Fit*: The frantic dance performed just after you've accidently walked through a spider web.

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Kryptic

294 posts in 385 days


#13 posted 02-06-2014 11:50 PM

Jimbo4, love your tag line ……. it made me laugh.

I am well past the addiction phase and am currently into therapy on how to refrain from spending money in the hope it can improve my skill set on a lathe …

View Joe Lyddon's profile

Joe Lyddon

7887 posts in 2777 days


#14 posted 02-07-2014 09:02 PM

I’m NOT a turner, BUT I would think it would enable one to get a better sanding job done…
... Cutting sounds very dangerous to me.

-- Have Fun! Joe Lyddon - Alta Loma, CA USA - Home: http://www.WoodworkStuff.net ... My Small Gallery: http://www.ncwoodworker.net/pp/showgallery.php?ppuser=1389&cat=500"

View Glen Peterson's profile

Glen Peterson

512 posts in 1781 days


#15 posted 02-12-2014 09:37 PM

I have the same lathe as you. When hollowing I frequently stand on the other side of the lathe to hollow the shoulder of a piece. I also typically move the headstock far to the right and stand at the end of the lathe bed which makes it easy to work from the fas side.
Cheers

-- Glen

showing 1 through 15 of 17 replies

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