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Forum topic by ArtRafael posted 02-03-2014 07:10 PM 1458 views 0 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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ArtRafael

123 posts in 1329 days


02-03-2014 07:10 PM

Recently completed miniature table vise build project. Ralph

View video on YouTube:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0CTModW5hdg&feature=share&list=UU-GXI1Wp8qMJcEsSWF5Eu5A


11 replies so far

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DanielS

123 posts in 1401 days


#1 posted 02-03-2014 07:59 PM

Nice. I love those things. If I hadn’t spent so much money at quad state I’d have picked a couple of them up.

-- Daniel S

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crank49

3981 posts in 2435 days


#2 posted 02-03-2014 08:37 PM

I used to have a complete setup for investment casting.
Had to sell it thanks to obamanomics, but I loved doing that stuff.
Now that I sold the farm I may build me a small kiln again.
Still have my vacuum pump and torches.
That is some nice work Art.
Do you ever cast any silicon bronze?
It works easier than Silver and has approximately the strength of mild steel.

-- Michael: Hillary has a long list of accomplishments, though most DAs would refer to them as felonies.

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ArtRafael

123 posts in 1329 days


#3 posted 02-03-2014 09:21 PM

Hi Michael.

I have cast everything from lead to bronze to gold – up to 1950 degrees. I’d like some day to cast iron, but, for now, that’s too hot for me.

Thanks for appreciating my work as only one who has done it (investment casting) can. I hope that you do get back to it. It is quite a rare art.

Ralph

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DanielS

123 posts in 1401 days


#4 posted 02-04-2014 01:31 AM

Just got to watch your video. That was very informative. Excellent work.

-- Daniel S

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crank49

3981 posts in 2435 days


#5 posted 02-04-2014 06:40 PM

Iron is not all that hard, but you do have to switch investment.
Melting is fairly easy in a cupola set-up using charcoal or coke with a good blower. Otherwise takes a lot of gas to get to 2500 degrees.

-- Michael: Hillary has a long list of accomplishments, though most DAs would refer to them as felonies.

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ArtRafael

123 posts in 1329 days


#6 posted 02-04-2014 07:40 PM

Thanks Daniel. I appreciate your interest and thoughts.

Thanks, Michael. What kind of investment would be needed for casting iron. All I know about it is, perhaps sand?? Still I would have trouble attaining 2500 degrees. Maybe in the future?

Ralph

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crank49

3981 posts in 2435 days


#7 posted 02-04-2014 08:58 PM

Art,
Clay and sand can work (green sand process), or just red clay, but these are not investment casting methods.

Or for small scale work something like Ransom & Randolph platinum investment.

-- Michael: Hillary has a long list of accomplishments, though most DAs would refer to them as felonies.

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Tim

3114 posts in 1425 days


#8 posted 02-05-2014 07:22 PM

Ralph that’s some amazing work. I for one would be interested in seeing some video on the casting process you already do. The other videos of things you have made are really impressive too.

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LakeLover

283 posts in 1403 days


#9 posted 02-05-2014 08:00 PM

Art.

Again nice job.

Do you allow for shrinkage in your wax molds. ? Do you have a centrifical caster, or pour from a crucible?

Crank were do do you get silicon bronze from ?

saw some guy pour aluminum in an aunts hill, that may hit the I am bored list on day this summer.

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ArtRafael

123 posts in 1329 days


#10 posted 02-05-2014 09:51 PM

Thanks Tim. I will try to do a video next time I cast something. Thanks again. Ralph

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ArtRafael

123 posts in 1329 days


#11 posted 02-05-2014 10:12 PM

Hi LakeLover. I don’t usually care about shrinkage as long as all the components for a particular piece shrink a minute but equal percentage as they tend to do even though I use no shrink rubber for the molds. Yet metal tends to shrink some as it cools. If I am building only one piece to mate to an existing part, I do make the wax pattern for the new part slightly bigger so that the final part can shrink to proper size. I typically use a centrifugal casting machine for better results, but I initially started out by doing simple gravity casts then improved from that.

The discerning eye can see some shrinkage from the master pattern on the right to the wax pattern in the middle to the final piece on the left, though it is not so obvious. Ralph

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