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Jointer in feed out feed system.

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Forum topic by Notsquare posted 200 days ago 646 views 0 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Notsquare

45 posts in 475 days


200 days ago

Topic tags/keywords: question resource jointer plane planer joining pine

So I am really sorry if this is kind of a known thing here, this would be news to me. But I was thinking of designing a jointer in feed out feed system. I have a few questions being such a new wood worker, I am just not too sure of. A lot of my projects include 2×4 or 2×6 in them. This is due to the people in my life wanting me to build them rather simple and cheap projects. Such as shelving units, massive outdoor tables, and the lot. So I work with a lot of bigger stock. My jointer is Jet Combo machine. The 12 inch version. Clearly I have tons of table space. Where it lacks a tad is length. So would an out feed screw up the straightness of the board? I doubt the in feed would effect it at all.. But there has to be a reason why I see in/out feeds on band saws, table saws, and the like, but no jointers/planners (well planners are more rare, but I have seen one or two on the lunch boxes.) What do you think? Has this been done? Anyone have any resources? Design suggestions, tips, or should I avoid this project all together. Few need to know this are, I work in a basement work shop, so I do have space, but not a metric butt ton. And I do not (yet getting one VERY soon) have a jointer plane. I did however try jointing a board with a #4.5 but that was a joke. Not only was that a workout I won’t soon forget, but I think I put more twist in it than it had :P so I pretty much rely on my jointer for now.

-- "Be who you are and say what you feel, because those who mind don't matter and those who matter don't mind"


11 replies so far

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pmayer

565 posts in 1692 days


#1 posted 197 days ago

building a homemade extension for a jointer table is meticulous work, and prone to error. In order for this to be worthwhile, it has to be perfect or you might cause yourself all sorts of problems. I’d suggest that you would be better off jointing longer stock with a straight edge and a router, rather than trying to create a perfectly flat/square/coplanar extension to your jointer. Or, actually, for the types of projects and materials that you are describing, you might just make yourself a sled with an 8’ piece of plywood, then screw the work piece down to the sled and run it through your table saw. Then just clean up saw marks using a light pass with your 4-1/2 plane (don’t alter the straight edge that you just created, simply remove any imperfections caused by the saw blade).

-- PaulMayer, http://www.vernswoodgoods.com

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Notsquare

45 posts in 475 days


#2 posted 170 days ago

Thank you for information. I honestly avoid using my jointer if I can. I love it, don’t get me wrong, I just think it takes too long to clean up the edge of a board. When working with 2×4 you don’t expect it to be perfect.. And even if you get a nice perfect edge, how long will it stay perfect right? I have had 2×4 move right after the 1st cut on the table saw before I got to planner.. I just work alone a lot, so I was looking for support more than anything. I have a fairly big jointer. But the 8 foot boards still like to move around on the table. I was thinking about getting a power feeder also. I have a really good connection to manufactures, and I get a benefit few others do. Maybe that will be a better route to go.

-- "Be who you are and say what you feel, because those who mind don't matter and those who matter don't mind"

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firefighterontheside

3772 posts in 483 days


#3 posted 170 days ago

I had a bench top jointer and tried to joint some 6’ boards for a table top. I made some make shift infeed and out feed supports. It didn’t go well. I was very frustrated with it. Ended up getting the best results as described by pmayer with the table saw. I decided the next step was to get a larger longer jointer. Now I can joint longer board much easier. I got mine for 225 and have seen them cheaper. If you intend to keep working with construction lumber, I would strongly encourage a long bed jointer.

-- Bill M. I love my job as a firefighter, but nothing gives me the satisfaction of running my hand over a project that I have built and just finished sanding.

View RockyTopScott's profile

RockyTopScott

1131 posts in 2105 days


#4 posted 170 days ago

Does the final product have 8’ spans in them? Why not cut to rough length then joint them?

-- “When you want to help people, you tell them the truth. When you want to help yourself, you tell them what they want to hear.” ― Thomas Sowell

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Notsquare

45 posts in 475 days


#5 posted 169 days ago

@ Firefighter, I am thinking about upgrading to a long bed when we move, right now I am maxed out on space, I plan on (for now) with larger boards I need dead flat to use a combo of hand and power jointer. Its a good suggestion, thank you. Also I want to say I appreciate your occupation, it is men and women like you that we all rely on, and need. So thank you for your hard work and sacrifice. @Rocky sometimes. If it does not I always cut to rough, then mill. One of my hobbies is building snake and reptile cages. Sometimes they need to be larger than 8 feet.. But over that distance they don’t need to be dead flat.. Construction grade timber is really bad here.. If I can get pieces that are somewhat in shape I am lucky. Anyway thank you all again for the suggestions and help, I knew there is a good reason why you don’t see people building this stuff often, just wanted to make sure, I am fairly new to the craft still.

-- "Be who you are and say what you feel, because those who mind don't matter and those who matter don't mind"

View runswithscissors's profile (online now)

runswithscissors

904 posts in 652 days


#6 posted 169 days ago

I have the same jointer-planer. I intend to add an outfeed extension sooner or later (that is, when I need it). I don’t see it as being a huge problem.

View Loren's profile (online now)

Loren

7398 posts in 2274 days


#7 posted 169 days ago

Extending the outfeed is more useful than extending the infeed.

I had a Robland with about a 60” length and built an outfeed table
for it, about another 24-30”. I jointed 8’ tall door stiles with it.

I attached a piece of aluminum angle iron tapped for set screws
to the jointer so I could jack up the end of the extra table to
be level with the iron table. The extra table was covered with
plastic laminate and edgebanded for stability. Holes were drilled
for the set screw heads to nest in. It had 2 independently height
adjustable legs at the far end.

-- http://lawoodworking.com

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Notsquare

45 posts in 475 days


#8 posted 169 days ago

wow nice.. Do you have pictures?

-- "Be who you are and say what you feel, because those who mind don't matter and those who matter don't mind"

View firefighterontheside's profile

firefighterontheside

3772 posts in 483 days


#9 posted 169 days ago

Notsquare, on behalf of my occupation, you’re welcome.

-- Bill M. I love my job as a firefighter, but nothing gives me the satisfaction of running my hand over a project that I have built and just finished sanding.

View levan's profile

levan

405 posts in 1606 days


#10 posted 169 days ago

Yes it can and has been done. In my line of work it was and is very common to have to joint and face plane lumber 20’ or longer.
What we did was build 3-4” thick torsion boxes 12” wide and 8’ long. These were built with White oak rails (for stability) and covered with a good quality 1/2” plywood. the top side we covered with phenolic, (wears like iron)this is just counter sunk and scewed on. We attached them to the jointer, similar to what Loren said. We used 3/4” bar stock with a adjusting height plate on it. at the jointer. The far ends have 1” square tubing with plugs and height adjusting bolts. They have hinged diagonal braces on them. At one time we had to remove the tables, when not in use. Sorry this is the best picture I currently have. You can just see the end at the left. These have been in use for about 25 years.
As for the power feeder on the jointer, it works like a dream!
If I can be of any help please feel free to pm me.
best wishes
Lynn

-- Lynn "If you think you can do a thing or think you can't do a thing, you're right". Henry Ford

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Notsquare

45 posts in 475 days


#11 posted 169 days ago

Wow! Nice shop! From what I can see that looks pretty amazing! Thank you for sharing!

-- "Be who you are and say what you feel, because those who mind don't matter and those who matter don't mind"

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