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Cabriole Legs Milled From Laminated Stock?

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Forum topic by barringerfurniture posted 02-02-2014 06:00 PM 1820 views 0 times favorited 13 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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barringerfurniture

223 posts in 1174 days


02-02-2014 06:00 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question cabriole legs laminated stock dining table

Hi folks! I may have a commission to build a “French Country” style dining room table in Cherry. The design to be used as a basis, has scalloped aprons and cabriole legs.

Never cut cabriole legs but I have the basic idea and I’m studying up on the rest. These legs would be approximately 30” tall. The upper and lower arcs appear to require somewhere around 5” thick square stock.

My only way of attaining that thickness is to laminate three boards of 8/4 Cherry together.

Do most folks find this acceptable? Any tips on hiding the seems between laminations? Other tips?

Any advice is much appreciated as always.

Thanks!

-- Scott Barringer, Sacramento, CA barringerfinefurniture.com


13 replies so far

View DKV's profile

DKV

3940 posts in 1966 days


#1 posted 02-02-2014 06:12 PM

As in all laminations the flatter the milled stock and grain match up determines seeing the seams. However, in your case how many people are going to get down on their hands and knees to look for seams?

-- This is a Troll Free zone.

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barringerfurniture

223 posts in 1174 days


#2 posted 02-02-2014 06:25 PM

Good point about people looking for it DKV. We woodworkers notice a lot that normal civilians don’t. And as you stated, my instinct is that it would be fine as long as I pay close attention to grain/color match and getting a nice, tight glue up.

-- Scott Barringer, Sacramento, CA barringerfinefurniture.com

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theoldfart

8080 posts in 1913 days


#3 posted 02-02-2014 06:28 PM

A darker finish will also serve to mask the lamination lines.

-- "With every tool obtained, there is another that is needed" DonW ( Kevin )

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barringerfurniture

223 posts in 1174 days


#4 posted 02-02-2014 06:42 PM

That’s a good idea theoldfart (laughing as I type that). Pretty sure stain of any kind is not an option. But perhaps a clearcoat with a nice dark amber tint.

-- Scott Barringer, Sacramento, CA barringerfinefurniture.com

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theoldfart

8080 posts in 1913 days


#5 posted 02-02-2014 06:50 PM

Scott, my kitchen cabinets, done before we bought the house, have a dark cherry stain. I don’t care for it but they are good cabinets and were brand new at the time. post some pics as the work progresses.

-- "With every tool obtained, there is another that is needed" DonW ( Kevin )

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barringerfurniture

223 posts in 1174 days


#6 posted 02-02-2014 07:52 PM

theoldfart, if I get the gig, I will for sure. It will end up in my portfolio of custom work.

It’s a long story, but Mahogany may be an option for this piece as well.

-- Scott Barringer, Sacramento, CA barringerfinefurniture.com

View jinkyjock's profile

jinkyjock

487 posts in 1036 days


#7 posted 02-02-2014 07:59 PM

Hi Scott, you could try using a polyurethane type glue rather than PVA as the glueline tends to be less visible on darker stock. I have made Cabriole legs, but nothing as monumental as yours, good luck.

View tyvekboy's profile

tyvekboy

1335 posts in 2475 days


#8 posted 02-02-2014 08:28 PM

Iʻve made an end table with cabriole legs and had to laminate mahogany. I canʻt really see the laminations. Matching the wood of close coloration is helpful.

The only advice that I can give is when band sawing the profiles drawn on two sides of the blank is not to cut it all the way through the first profile. Leave about 1/2 inch of wood uncut. Then all you have to do after cutting the first profile is put a piece of wood that is about the thickness of the saw kerf into the saw kerf and tape it together. Then you can cut the other pattern.

Here is one I did 40 years ago

Another thing I would suggest is to cut and fit any mortise and tenonʻs first while the leg is a square blank. Makes cutting mortise and tenon a lot easier.

-- Tyvekboy -- Marietta, GA ………….. one can never be too organized

View Boris 's profile

Boris

189 posts in 2377 days


#9 posted 02-02-2014 08:29 PM

I made one to learn, I laminated some poplar and did not pay attention to the grain and you can see it, if you want take a look at it in my projects, I watched a video in finewoodworking.com by Philip C Lowe very informative.
Regards

View Texcaster's profile

Texcaster

1138 posts in 1136 days


#10 posted 02-02-2014 10:52 PM

I’ve made a fair few French tables. They had to pass as the real thing, laminations were out of the question. They were always in Cherry with 4×4 Maple legs. I made them for an antique dealer, he did the polishing. They always looked the part.

A few notes on cab legs… test your design with a sample. The 3D leg can look very different from your 2D design.
.................................. ... use a mitered filet at the rail/leg joint to avoid crumbling short grain and it looks too cool.
................................. ....a scratch stock helps with a carved bead.

Another French leg

-- Mama calls me Texcaster but my real name is Mr. Earl.

View JayG46's profile

JayG46

138 posts in 1320 days


#11 posted 02-03-2014 10:38 AM

Scott – I don’t know if your client would like this but sometimes laminating a thinner strip of a contrasting wood in between the primary pieces takes the emphasis off grain matching and glue lines. I’ve used the technique on several projects and personally like the look.

-- Jay Gargiulo, Naples, FL www.swallowtailwoodcraft.com "Once you understand the way broadly, you can see it in all things."- Miyamoto Musashi

View barringerfurniture's profile

barringerfurniture

223 posts in 1174 days


#12 posted 02-05-2014 03:46 AM

Thanks for all the tips everyone. tyvekboy, that looks pretty nice. There is a small possibility of doing the job in Mahogany which I think would be fairly appropriate for the piece. I could see how the grain in Mahogany would help to hide the glue lines. Either way – Mahogany or Cherry, I’m okay with laminating but being careful about grain/color match.

If I get the gig, I’ll post pics for sure.

Thanks again.

-- Scott Barringer, Sacramento, CA barringerfinefurniture.com

View Texcaster's profile

Texcaster

1138 posts in 1136 days


#13 posted 02-05-2014 04:07 AM

I’m just being pedantic here. Furniture from the provinces was usually made of “fruitwood”, cherry, apple, beech, pear, peach & oak. Common timbers in the French countryside. The one thing they all have in common ( except oak ) is closed pores and could be easily mixed. Mahogany was imported and very dear.

-- Mama calls me Texcaster but my real name is Mr. Earl.

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