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Delta 36-714B Left Tilt Table Saw

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Forum topic by Core2 posted 02-02-2014 05:00 PM 4050 views 0 times favorited 13 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Core2

58 posts in 1069 days


02-02-2014 05:00 PM

Topic tags/keywords: table saw 36-714 b used help

I need the forums help! Is the delta 36-714b left tilt table saw a decent saw? what would be a good price on a 6 year old saw of this type? I have found one for sale in my area. From the pics it looks like it is in perfect shape. The guy said he wants more space in his garage. If that is the truth that tells me that he must not be into woodworking all that much. So maybe the table is not all that used.

Any suggestions on price and what to look for on the table would be great.

Thanks in advance.


13 replies so far

View cabmaker's profile

cabmaker

1507 posts in 2272 days


#1 posted 02-02-2014 05:36 PM

just another light saw made in china with deltas name on it.

Wouldn’t be worth much to me but I can see paying, maybe up to a couple hundred for it.

JB

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knotscott

7211 posts in 2839 days


#2 posted 02-02-2014 05:37 PM

I’d guess it’s at least 6 years old, but could be older….they were introduced ~ 2005. It’s an earlier hybrid with table mounted trunnions, and a motor mount and drive system that’s very similar to the venerable Cman 22124 hybrid made by Steel City. It should have solid cast iron wings, a full enclosure, 1-3/4hp motor, and likely a Delta T2 fence, but could even have a Unifence or Biesemeyer. They were decent saws that sold for $800-$1100 new, so should resell in good shape for ~ $400-$600.


-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

View woodman88's profile

woodman88

127 posts in 2112 days


#3 posted 02-02-2014 06:05 PM

I had one with the beisemeyer 30in rail and table ext.
It was a decent saw underpowered if you were ripping thicker hardwoods thought.
I wouldn’t go more than $500-$600 with Beismeyer or $400 with T2
Just have to remember not a true cabinet saw

View Core2's profile

Core2

58 posts in 1069 days


#4 posted 02-02-2014 07:06 PM

This is a great website and bunch of people!

Thanks for the info. The guy is wanting 500 for it. I have been using a 1989 Craftsman with a board laid across as a rip fence. It would be a big upgrade for me. But I have been getting into projects with thicker hardwoods. Maybe I should wait, build up some more coin and get something else. I appreciate everyone’s input.

the saw i have now is 1.75 hp. I just come in from ripping 1-3/4” poplar and it seems to bog down a little with it. I think I would like more power.

Back to the shop for now:)

View knotscott's profile

knotscott

7211 posts in 2839 days


#5 posted 02-02-2014 08:20 PM

Blade selection and fence alignment are a big part of the cutting equation. 1-3/4” popular is best cut with something like a decent 3/32” thin kerf 24T rip blade. Irwin Marples and Diablo blades are < $30. Also, wood is easier to cut when it’s flat and straight prior to ripping.

One another possible option is to wire the motor for 220v if you have it available. Depending on your particular circuit, you may get faster recovery from lugging, which will make is seem to bog a little less.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

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Core2

58 posts in 1069 days


#6 posted 02-02-2014 09:33 PM

Well it is already gone. It looked like a good clean saw. Oh well More time to research some more saws.

View mscot's profile

mscot

13 posts in 742 days


#7 posted 12-01-2014 06:19 PM

Hello All,
I’m going to look at a 36-714 this evening. He’s asking $400 for it. Is this a good deal?

I’m concerned about two things: the trunions are table mounted and it doesn’t have a riving knife.

Re: Trunions: how does this affect the saw? I’m coming from a job site saw so I don’t know what this means?

Re: Riving knife: I’ve always said that I wouldn’t buy a saw without a riving knife for safety reasons. The BORK is $150 without a guard ($185 with) which means I’d be paying $600 for a used saw in the end (plus the cost to rewire it to 240).
This alone seems to be enough reason not to buy it.

What do you guys think?

View Richard's profile

Richard

1898 posts in 2153 days


#8 posted 12-01-2014 06:26 PM

mscot , I am not sure about the other issues but rewireing it to run 220/240 is almost no cost at all you just need the new plug.

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mscot

13 posts in 742 days


#9 posted 12-01-2014 08:46 PM

Thanks Richard. So you’re saying I just cut off the existing end plug and replace it with a new one? I assume I also need to make a change on the engine. Does it make more sense to just buy a new cable with plug?

I’m pretty conflicted on the other two. Sure, I can add a riving knife at some point and get by with splitters in the meantime but the trunions can never be mounted on the cabinet.

Is the table alignment something that I’ll need to set once and forget or does it require regular tune-ups?

I’m using a Dewalt 744 right now so I don’t know what to expect.

View knotscott's profile

knotscott

7211 posts in 2839 days


#10 posted 12-01-2014 08:59 PM

If you already have 220v available, switching the saw from 120v to 240v (aka 110v/220v) is remarkably simple and pretty cheap. There should be a schematic diagram on the inside of the wire junction box of the motor (it should also be in the manual) ....you change the wires for 220v according to that diagram (maybe two connections…5-10 minutes max). You’ll also need to change the plug to whatever type is on your 220v outlet. It’s that simple.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

View Richard's profile

Richard

1898 posts in 2153 days


#11 posted 12-02-2014 12:03 AM

What knotscott just said , you change the connections on the motor assuming it is a dual voltage motor and then rewire a new plug on the cord to match your 220v outlet. I just did it on an old rockwell contractor saw I got and it running fine and drawing a lot less amps than it would on 110v .

View RogueKyle's profile

RogueKyle

15 posts in 698 days


#12 posted 01-11-2015 11:18 PM

mscot had a few questions that I share:


I m pretty conflicted on the other two. Sure, I can add a riving knife at some point and get by with splitters in the meantime but the trunions can never be mounted on the cabinet.

Is the table alignment something that I ll need to set once and forget or does it require regular tune-ups?
- mscot

can anyone address these topics?

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

5765 posts in 949 days


#13 posted 01-12-2015 02:31 AM

Cabinet mounted trunnions are heavier duty and it makes it easier to align the table to the blade.

Once you get it set, that’s generally it. For a good while.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

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