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Forum topic by fredd3039 posted 02-01-2014 01:17 AM 934 views 0 times favorited 13 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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fredd3039

13 posts in 1638 days


02-01-2014 01:17 AM

I ma getting tearout with my planes no matter what I do. I am new to using hand woodworking tools and I have watched every video and read everything by Schwarz but I cant seem to get them working correctly. Is there anyone in South Carolina that can teach me how to set these things up properly. Also I sharpened them with water stones and they are razor sharp. I just cant seem to get them set up.


13 replies so far

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Airframer

3040 posts in 1412 days


#1 posted 02-01-2014 01:21 AM

Are you going with the grain?

-- Eric - "I'm getting proficient with these hand jobbers. - BigRedKnothead"

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Don W

17955 posts in 2027 days


#2 posted 02-01-2014 01:22 AM

Keep at it.

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.net

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Airframer

3040 posts in 1412 days


#3 posted 02-01-2014 01:28 AM

I really have a feeling this is a grain direction issue. If the blade is really as sharp as you say and you are going with the grain tearout should not be an issue.

Here is a decent video about reading grain direction and how it relates to planing (granted he is using a power jointer but the principles are the same)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=14i_gaLw_5I

-- Eric - "I'm getting proficient with these hand jobbers. - BigRedKnothead"

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lateralus819

2236 posts in 1349 days


#4 posted 02-01-2014 01:32 AM

A piece of curly maple is a good test of sharpness.

Start with the blade fully retracted, keep moving the plane along the surface until it’s barely catching. Once you get a feel for that, you should be okay.

Have you tried putting a slight back bevel on the back of the blade?

Also, what i do sometimes when it’s bad enough, dampen the surface lightly with a towl. Also works for planers.

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lateralus819

2236 posts in 1349 days


#5 posted 02-01-2014 01:33 AM

Ill agree airhammer, but i still have issues with quartersawn Af. mahogany.

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fredd3039

13 posts in 1638 days


#6 posted 02-01-2014 02:32 AM

I have tried planing the wood both ways/directions. It is quarter sawn cherry. Am I maybe trying to take off to much material in a pass. What is the ideal shaving for a Veritas Bevel up Jointer and a Lie Neilson No 4.

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Randy_ATX

835 posts in 1901 days


#7 posted 02-01-2014 02:39 AM

Fredd – see post #4, paragraph #2 if you think you are taking off too much.

-- Randy -- Austin, TX by way of Northwest (Woodville), OH

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chrisstef

15656 posts in 2465 days


#8 posted 02-01-2014 03:04 AM

An ideal shaving would be “read the newspaper through it”.

-- rock, chalk, jayhawk

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lateralus819

2236 posts in 1349 days


#9 posted 02-01-2014 03:11 AM

Also, forgot to add, try skewing the plane a little bit. Sometime’s that helps.

I can understand your frustration. I remember feeling the same way, until what i realized was sharp, was certainly NOT sharp.

How how of a grit are you sharpening too? I typically go to 8000 grit. Some say less is fine, i use it cause thats what i have. Is the cutting edge Like a mirror on the front/back?

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fredd3039

13 posts in 1638 days


#10 posted 02-01-2014 04:41 AM

Ok I figured it out. It was the chip breaker. It was back to far from the edge of the Iron. I moved it to within .005 and it is working better. Now I believe my shavings are still to thick because I definitely cant read a newspaper through them. Also I can feel raised lines after I am finished planing the wood. the lines are not thick at all but they are there. Is this from taking to deep a cut?

View jdh122's profile

jdh122

879 posts in 2277 days


#11 posted 02-01-2014 12:13 PM

There’s no such thing as an ideal shaving thickness – depends on the stage of the work you’re doing. When dimensioning wood, the ideal shaving is the very thickest shaving you can get without having tearout. Final finishing, on the other hand, calls for lots thinner.
I have had good success with back bevels (or a higher microbevel in the case of your BU jointer) to eliminate tear-out.
There’s a link floating around for a Japanese research video on planes that suggests two things: you can plane even against the grain if your plane is sharp enough, and the setting of the chip breaker is really crucial for eliminating tearout.
Keep at it – my first planing experiences were terrible too, to the point that I gave up on planes and used cabinet and card scrapers almost exclusively for a while, but I found that with better sharpening, sometimes back-bevels, chip-breaker setting and better grain-reading I improved tremendously (still have a ways to go).
The lines left by the plane is not because you’re taking too deep a cut – the iron on your finishing plane should have the corners relieved (just a tiny bit – on your final sharpening stone).

-- Jeremy, in the Acadian forests

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Don W

17955 posts in 2027 days


#12 posted 02-01-2014 12:15 PM

There are two schools of thought for the lines. You can either put a very slight camber on the iron, or round the corners. Both ways work so its a personal preference.

Here is some advice on chip breaker settings, http://lumberjocks.com/donwilwol/blog/30376

But it sounds like you are close. What happens when you just back up the cutter to take a finer cut?

If the sole isn’t flat, that will have an effect. Here is some tuning help, http://timetestedtools.wordpress.com/2013/02/04/tuning-it-up-bench-plane-style/

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.net

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RS Woodworks

533 posts in 2711 days


#13 posted 02-01-2014 12:19 PM

First of all, what type of plane are you using, and what is your goal? Is this lumber dimensioning or final smoothing?
“Sharp” is a relative term, and in my experience, 98% of people who think there blades are sharp, are wrong. If you are not very experienced in sharpening and using good stones up to at least 8000 grit, then your blade is not actually as sharp as you think.
For a fine smoothing plane, your shavings should be no more than about 2 to 3 thousandths. I shoot for 1 to 1.5 on most of my smoothers.
As for the “raised lines” it’s because your blade corners are digging in. Relieve the corners a bit and you will do much better.

-- I restore the finest vintage tools! If you need a nice plane, saw, marking tool or brace, please let me know!

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