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Sharpest Tool in the Shed? Yes or No???

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Forum topic by DIYaholic posted 01-25-2014 04:55 PM 1234 views 2 times favorited 18 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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DIYaholic

19173 posts in 2137 days


01-25-2014 04:55 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question oak maple lathe chisel turning sharpening

I could use the help of seasoned veterans….
Or anyone smarter than I!!!

Here is my recently completed sharpening station:

I need to know if I actually got my tools sharp enough….
Here are pictures of chips from my test turning.
Pictures are from my phone, so not the best.
Hard maple & some oak….

Chips from spindle gouge:

Chips from my skew:

Thanks, in advance for the help….

-- Randy-- I may not be good...but I am slow! If good things come to those who wait.... Why is procrastination a bad thing?


18 replies so far

View TheGermanJoiner's profile

TheGermanJoiner

847 posts in 1099 days


#1 posted 01-25-2014 05:26 PM

Not a clue randy. But I still love that sharpening station. ;)

-- Greg - Ferdinand and Son Construction: Do it right the first time. Like us on Facebook

View Jimbo4's profile

Jimbo4

1432 posts in 2225 days


#2 posted 01-25-2014 05:31 PM

Me neither – but then sometimes I’m not the sharpest tool in the shop.

-- BOVILEXIA: The urge to moo at cows from a moving vehicle.

View DIYaholic's profile

DIYaholic

19173 posts in 2137 days


#3 posted 01-25-2014 05:33 PM

Guys,
You may not have the answers, but….
You did bump my inquiry to the top!
Thanks!!!

-- Randy-- I may not be good...but I am slow! If good things come to those who wait.... Why is procrastination a bad thing?

View TheDane's profile

TheDane

4997 posts in 3125 days


#4 posted 01-25-2014 05:38 PM

Randy—Nice job on the sharpening rig!

Can’t judge the sharpness you are achieving … that’s one of those touchy-feely things.

-- Gerry -- "I don't plan to ever really grow up ... I'm just going to learn how to act in public!"

View lew's profile

lew

11336 posts in 3217 days


#5 posted 01-25-2014 05:42 PM

I have found that the appearance of the shavings have a lot more to do with the moisture content of the wood, direction of the grain and the type of wood more than the sharpness of the tool.

Sure, a dull tool won’t cut cleanly but some wood just doesn’t produce those long curly shavings. Green wood usually does and that’s often what you see happening in videos. Really dry wood splinters and tears as does most softwood.

I saw an interesting video from Cap’n Eddie that explained how even the direction of the cut can tear at the grain of the wood.

PS- I like your sharpening station.

-- Lew- Time traveler. Purveyor of the Universe's finest custom rolling pins.

View bandit571's profile

bandit571

14560 posts in 2145 days


#6 posted 01-25-2014 05:43 PM

One trick I learned a long time ago

Take a piece of hardwood, run the rpms up a bit, let the scrap of wood rub against the spinning wood. Be careful, as too much pressure will cause burning.

Instead of sandpaper, use the scrap of wood to polish the project up, nice and smooth.

( this from a guy who also has used a PLANE to smooth rough turned blanks on the lathe. Sits real nice of the tool rest, though. )

-- A Planer? I'M the planer, this is what I use

View Dave's profile

Dave

11405 posts in 2302 days


#7 posted 01-25-2014 05:47 PM

Randy there are two schools of sharpening with turning tools.
Here is the one I agree with.
The tool need only to have a grinder edge. The workpiece is turning at high rpm past the tool. So all you need is a toothed edge to remove the material with little tear out.
That works good for gouges.
Scrapers should be handled like a card scraper. They need very crisp edges with a bit of a hook on them.
The skew should be your sharpest tool in the lot. Sharp like a knife.
The bevel your grinder produces is the key to not getting as many catches.

Second school is to get them all as sharp as possible. I don’t believe you have to do that.

You will have to find the angles and bevel grinds that work for you. Each person is different.

-- Superdav "No matter where you go - there you are." http://chiselandforge.com

View DIYaholic's profile

DIYaholic

19173 posts in 2137 days


#8 posted 01-25-2014 06:06 PM

Thanks for the input!

They seemed to be cutting ok. As a newbie, just thought I’d try to get some feedback.
I’m just gonna make a few pens….
Practice, practice & practice some more.
If need be….
I can always shape & smooth with a bit of sandpaper!!! ;^)

Again, thanks for your time and insights!!!

-- Randy-- I may not be good...but I am slow! If good things come to those who wait.... Why is procrastination a bad thing?

View William's profile

William

9906 posts in 2304 days


#9 posted 01-25-2014 06:19 PM

Depends on what your definition of “sharp” is.

Are you happy with it?
Was there no bad catches?
If the answer is yes to both of those then yes, as a beginner, they are sharp.
With the exception of my skew, my tools go straight from the grinder to the lathe.
Here is the way I check for sharpness though.
I rake the tool across a fingernail. A sharp tool will scrape off a constant thin strip of fingernail.
A dull tool will simply skate across the top of it.

-- http://wddsrfinewoodworks.blogspot.com/

View mpax356's profile

mpax356

67 posts in 1954 days


#10 posted 01-25-2014 06:26 PM

For some tools such as the roughing gouge, I prefer to turn on a platform. It is just safer. If you are putting a steep bevel or your slide arm is not tight, you have a risk of the tool dropping down and getting caught on the wheel and then bad things happen. DAMHIKT!

-- MPax, Atlanta

View DIYaholic's profile

DIYaholic

19173 posts in 2137 days


#11 posted 01-25-2014 06:38 PM

William,
Happy? YES, I think so!
NO BAD catches? YES!
I’ll have to try that fingernail test.
Hmmm… Is that why they call it a “fingernail grind”??? ;^)

Glad you enjoyed your date night!!!

MPax,
I’ll take that under advisement!!!

Thanks guys….

-- Randy-- I may not be good...but I am slow! If good things come to those who wait.... Why is procrastination a bad thing?

View boxcarmarty's profile

boxcarmarty

13508 posts in 1822 days


#12 posted 01-25-2014 06:40 PM

If the chips are on the floor and the workpiece is still on the chuck, then it’s good…..

-- My mind is like lighting, one brilliant flash, then its gone.....

View jeff's profile

jeff

988 posts in 2927 days


#13 posted 01-25-2014 07:21 PM

Good post Randy…It looks like your sharpening station is heading you in the right direction-very nice…I watch a lot of youtube videos on sharpening and proper use of the tool when your turning…

-- Jeff,Tucson,Az.

View DIYaholic's profile

DIYaholic

19173 posts in 2137 days


#14 posted 01-25-2014 07:27 PM

Marty,
The workpiece is still in the chuck,
The chips, however…
Are in a bowl next to the salsa!!!

Jeff,
Thanks,
Enjoy your warm weather….
I’ll be here in Vermont shivering!!!

-- Randy-- I may not be good...but I am slow! If good things come to those who wait.... Why is procrastination a bad thing?

View JonShank's profile

JonShank

8 posts in 1065 days


#15 posted 01-26-2014 07:02 AM

Yeah, it’s really hard to say much just based on the shavings, but if that turning is straight from the tools with no sanding I would say your doing pretty good!

Sharpening station looks awesome, very nicely done. I have the wolverine jig and it works well for me, looks like you hit all the right points with your version of it, should work good for you. I often do a little honing on my tools after the grinder, not on roughing gouges, but on bowl gouges and screws and scrapers. Just sandpaper, 320 I think on a granite plate. I keep that set up for chisels and plane blades, so it’s there and easy to take a swipe on. Gives a cleaner, more refined edge on the straight edged tools in particular. You want a nice smooth edge on your skew to slice clean. Just gotta play around and figure out what works for you. Based on the cleaness of the pen parts it looks like your doing just fine.

Jon

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