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FLAT GROUND VS. HOLLOW GROUND

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Forum topic by JUC posted 01-24-2014 06:41 PM 1699 views 0 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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JUC

116 posts in 1356 days


01-24-2014 06:41 PM

I am going to upgrade my sharpening system. I see a lot written about flat vs hollow ground. What do you all prefer and why? I will be sharpening plane blades and chisels for the most part.
Thank you for your time and knowledge!!
Jeffrey

-- If no one will ever see it, all the more reason to make it right


11 replies so far

View Texcaster's profile

Texcaster

1140 posts in 1140 days


#1 posted 01-24-2014 06:55 PM

Flat or hollow would work for me. I use a grinder and start with a hollow grind. When I get to the stones I press the tip flat to find the angle, then lift slightly and hone a micro bevel

-- Mama calls me Texcaster but my real name is Mr. Earl.

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sikrap

1121 posts in 2825 days


#2 posted 01-24-2014 07:16 PM

A hollow grind makes it easier to freehand hone (IMHO), but that’s the only advantage I can think of. I use a flat grind and I almost never use a grinder. If I need to bring an iron back into square, I do it the way Deneb shows on one of the Lie Nielsen videos (I believe its Quick Tip #4) which is to stand the iron up vertically and just drag it across sandpaper. Its every bit as fast as a grinder and I don’t have to worry about overheating it. I also have a WorkSharp 3000 that I can use to re-establish a bevel if I want. To actually create the bevel, I either use the WS or I use a 220 waterstone and my MKII jig. Both give me a flat primary bevel and I just adjust the angle for the secondary bevel. HTH

-- Dave, Colonie, NY

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b2rtch

4823 posts in 2514 days


#3 posted 01-24-2014 07:50 PM

If you watch Paul Sellers videos , he recommends (against every one else opinion) a convex surface.
When I was a kid and living in France, all the chisels I ever saw had a convex surface and they worked well.
A convex surface is also easier to achieve and it does require any special equipment.
I used to use scary sharp and after to use diamond sharpening stone and to try very hard to have a perfectly flat surface. I no longer do that.I now use a convex surface and it works very well for me.

-- Bert

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TheGermanJoiner

847 posts in 1103 days


#4 posted 01-24-2014 08:21 PM

+1 Bert and Paul sellers. Easier to do too

-- Greg - Ferdinand and Son Construction: Do it right the first time. Like us on Facebook

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Don W

17971 posts in 2033 days


#5 posted 01-24-2014 08:38 PM

I like the hollow grind because its easier to free hand. You also get the advantages of a micro bevel with out a micro bevel. Although after the initial sharpening I usually don’t hollow grind again unless I need the grinder to take out a nick.

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.net

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b2rtch

4823 posts in 2514 days


#6 posted 01-24-2014 10:33 PM

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JUC

116 posts in 1356 days


#7 posted 01-25-2014 12:52 AM

Thanks for the comments and help. I can not find Lie Nielsen video [quick tips #4] on their site. I will keep looking. Bret that was a informative video, thanks.
Just looking for information before I spend the $. We all own tools we wish we and not bought. I really try to keep it to a minimum.Thanks,
Jeffrey

-- If no one will ever see it, all the more reason to make it right

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Don W

17971 posts in 2033 days


#8 posted 01-25-2014 12:59 AM

I know there are a zillion sharpening blogs, but I’ve been through most. I simplified. http://lumberjocks.com/donwilwol/blog/24179

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.net

View Texcaster's profile

Texcaster

1140 posts in 1140 days


#9 posted 01-25-2014 02:12 AM

I micro bevel a hollow ground edge just to avoid honing the heel and stone wear. Also it is easier to camber if I want. I also stop at the hard black Arkansas ( 1000- 1300 grit ). A 60 grit aluminium oxide wheel, dressed frequently cuts fast and cool for me.

-- Mama calls me Texcaster but my real name is Mr. Earl.

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sikrap

1121 posts in 2825 days


#10 posted 01-25-2014 02:51 AM

Here is a link to the LN video. Enjoy!!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yogRewlMWrc&list=PL1E4A85B18EB8D8BA&index=9

-- Dave, Colonie, NY

View JUC's profile

JUC

116 posts in 1356 days


#11 posted 01-25-2014 07:46 PM

Thank you all so much for all your advise and information.
Dave thank you for the link, I am not much of a computer person. I will look at it tonight. I am in my shop today.
thanks again!!
Jeffrey

-- If no one will ever see it, all the more reason to make it right

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