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Few questions about building tabletop

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Forum topic by LiveEdge posted 01-23-2014 04:32 PM 1766 views 0 times favorited 8 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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LiveEdge

486 posts in 1085 days


01-23-2014 04:32 PM

Topic tags/keywords: table jointer question leaves

I’m working on a mission style dining room tresle table and have built up the base and am ready to build the top itself. The top is going to 68×42 and have two 12×42 leaves that can be added. I had a few questions and was looking for advice.

1) I have a decent table saw and planer but don’t have a jointer. Typically I’ve used the sled technique on the table saw to mill the edges of my wood. Is this technique up to the task of not leaving gaps between the wood pieces?

2) I assume the best aesthetics come from using the same piece of wood down the length of the table even if it will be cut in the center where the leaves will be inserted. How about the wood for the leaves? Is that typically made from other pieces and not the portion of wood from the center of the long piece (so that the grain matches the whole way when all the leaves are in)?

3) Speaking of the leaves, would it be an aesthetic disaster to have the wood run perpendicular to the rest of the table so I can use 2 6×42” pieces instead of 7 6×12” pieces?

4) I understand how the table slides attach to the tabletop, but what is the best way for the slides to attach to the trestles, especially if I would like the table to be able to be disassembed if it is moved?


8 replies so far

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Lee Barker

2170 posts in 2315 days


#1 posted 01-23-2014 04:52 PM

Taken in order, LiveEdge:

1. Try the sled technique, maybe on scrap of similar length. If it’s good enough, it’s good enough. If it isn’t, off to craigslist for a jointer of at least 48” bed length.

2. Most often grain direction on leaves is the same as grain direction on the table. Likewise, most often trestle tables do not have center leaves, they have leaves added at the end. Here’s an image that fits the latter but not the former.

There are exceptions of course:

Some trestle leaves come up from the end. Pretty cool.

3. Your call; what pleases your eye.

4. Never done that; don’t know. Buy the hardware and it will come clear. Actually I hope you already did that so your trestle height is correct.

I hope this rambling helps.

Kindly,

Lee

-- "...in his brain, which is as dry as the remainder biscuit after a voyage, he hath strange places cramm'd with observation, the which he vents in mangled forms." --Shakespeare, "As You Like It"

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LiveEdge

486 posts in 1085 days


#2 posted 01-23-2014 05:33 PM

Thanks Lee, you have always been helpful. I’ll try the sled. I have the card of someone that can do some jointing for me. I kinda wanted to feel like I did the whole thing myself, but it may also be best to leave the most important part to the professional.

I have, indeed, bought the table slides. The leaves will be in the center. That’s the way the table was that I patterned mine after. It also allows for self storage of the leaves which, I think, is cool.

Do you think there are any tips or tricks I haven’t anticipated as I put it together?

View pintodeluxe's profile

pintodeluxe

4858 posts in 2278 days


#3 posted 01-23-2014 05:54 PM

For extension tables I run the grain direction side to side. If you run the grain direction lengthwise, the expansion and contraction of the wood will cause problems with the alignment pins.
It is easier to handle 4’ pieces of lumber, and it looks great.

Try your jointing sled, and dry clamp the pieces together. If the joints are acceptable, go ahead with the glueup. If not, enlist someone to help. Otherwise consider buying a jointer. I have found the jointer an invaluable tool.
Here is my arts and crafts extension table…
http://lumberjocks.com/projects/56957
best of luck

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

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LiveEdge

486 posts in 1085 days


#4 posted 01-23-2014 05:59 PM

I’d buy the jointer in a minute if I felt like I had the room. Right now I just work in my two car garage, but the expectation is that when I’m done working we can still park two cars in it. :)

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LiveEdge

486 posts in 1085 days


#5 posted 01-23-2014 06:05 PM

Thanks for the link. My table is essentially the same with only a few decorative differences.

How did you choose to attach the slides to the trestles? Did you just drill screws up through the horizontal pieces that sits on top of the two legs?

I’ll definitely give some thought to running the boards side to side, although they will actually be longer rather than shorter. (The table is 68” long and since the split is in the center half of that is 34” rather than 42”).

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LiveEdge

486 posts in 1085 days


#6 posted 01-24-2014 05:29 PM

Just to update, I milled a few pieces in the garage and the joints are not bad. One or two look like they need to have another run through the table saw, but nothing too bad. Thanks for the help!

View Lee Barker's profile

Lee Barker

2170 posts in 2315 days


#7 posted 01-24-2014 11:43 PM

If you have a blade stabilizer on your TS, that would help guarantee the best outcomes.

Onward!

Kindly,

Lee

-- "...in his brain, which is as dry as the remainder biscuit after a voyage, he hath strange places cramm'd with observation, the which he vents in mangled forms." --Shakespeare, "As You Like It"

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LiveEdge

486 posts in 1085 days


#8 posted 01-24-2014 11:50 PM

That might be a good idea, but wouldn’t it get in the way while cutting a 8/4” piece sitting on top of a piece of MDF? I’ll have to see what they look like at our local hardware store.

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