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Mitered bracket feet with splines

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Forum topic by Michigander posted 01-22-2014 08:11 PM 785 views 0 times favorited 8 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Michigander

214 posts in 1887 days


01-22-2014 08:11 PM

Topic tags/keywords: mitered feet spline

I am making a set of 4 mitered bracket feet that will be splined at the miter. I have made the groove in the miter faces but have a couple of simple questions:
1. what material should the splines be made from. The feet are cherry.
2. I am struggling to make the splines the correct thickness. Every time I rip a board to what I think is the right thickness it comes out too fat or too skinny for the groove. I am ripping the thin spline so the spline is away from the fence so if it’s wrong I have to start all over again. The thickness of the blade is .110” thick.
I assume the spline needs to be a tight fit. Is that correct?
Your help is appreciated.
Thanks!
Michigander


8 replies so far

View Hammerthumb's profile

Hammerthumb

2533 posts in 1443 days


#1 posted 01-22-2014 08:16 PM

you can alway plane or scrape a thicker spline until it fits.

-- Paul, Las Vegas

View basswood's profile

basswood

261 posts in 1088 days


#2 posted 01-22-2014 08:42 PM

You can tape a spline that is just a bit too thick to the outside of the blade. Line your stock up with the outside of the spline on the blade, then tap the fence over so the cut will be a few thousandths thinner than the one you just made and test fit.

That is the “informed trial and error method”. I sometimes repeat this method and rip a few splines of varying thicknesses and use the one with the best fit.

Hope that makes sense.

I try to use the same wood and same grain orientation and same rings per inch in splines, though that can’t exactly be done in mitered joints.

-- http://www.basswoodmodular.com/Tri-Horse-Builder-Plans-p/thbp.htm

View Michigander's profile

Michigander

214 posts in 1887 days


#3 posted 01-23-2014 03:53 PM

Thanks for the replies guys! Hammer, I hadn’t thought of using a scraper so will give that a try. I tried using a plane but couldn’t get my #4 Stanley to work. I need a small bench plane I think. But Basswood, I really like your idea of using the tape to re-saw the spline. I’ll try that if the scraper doesn’t do the trick.
Thanks Guys!
Michigander

View bladeburner's profile

bladeburner

88 posts in 2555 days


#4 posted 01-23-2014 07:34 PM

Strongest spline orientation is grain a right angles to the spline. IOW, saw lengths of end grain to fit the spline slot.
Most people will use long grain in a spline; pretty, but you can probably snap it with your fingers. Try snapping end grain across a spline slot! And use 2 or more pieces if necessary.
Sometimes for esthetics, I’ll put an inch or less in the ends of the slots, of some other ‘pretty’ wood; even long grain.

View Michigander's profile

Michigander

214 posts in 1887 days


#5 posted 01-23-2014 10:21 PM

Bladeburner, using end grain makes sense. The splines on the feet will be totally hidden (they run from floor to base) so looks is not an issue. Easier to cut too!
Thanks,
Michigander

View bladeburner's profile

bladeburner

88 posts in 2555 days


#6 posted 01-23-2014 11:51 PM

BTW Michigander, I glue smallish corner blocks in each of my bracket feet inside corners. About an inch square where it can’t be seen. I do it ‘cause grandad did it!

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Michigander

214 posts in 1887 days


#7 posted 01-24-2014 03:34 PM

Bladeburner. the small glue-blocks sound line a good idea. I will definitely add them.
Thanks,
John

View Michigander's profile

Michigander

214 posts in 1887 days


#8 posted 01-27-2014 12:47 AM

I finished my bracket feet guided by your help. I learned so much doing this part of the project, that I put my first blog on the subject. I posted pictures of the process and the finished mitered splined bracket feet. Check out my first blog!
Thanks for your help!
Michigander

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