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Forum topic by Keith Kelly posted 01-22-2014 06:45 PM 1707 views 0 times favorited 9 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Keith Kelly

223 posts in 1123 days


01-22-2014 06:45 PM

I just picked up some freshly cut soft maple. I plan on primarily using this wood as turning practice (I’m a n00b at woodturning) but I also might mill up some short lumber pieces for small boxes and toys.

I have a gallon of Rockler’s end-grain sealer on hand. My guess is that now’s the time to apply the sealer, and set the logs somewhere. However, some of the logs are huge, so these are my questions: Would you split or chop them up somehow? Particularly for the huge log…how would you prepare it for future bowl turning?

No particular projects are planned for this wood, other than practicing turning, and I’d like to have a grab bag of turnable stock. Perhaps bowls, toys, handles, and other things as I learn. So, feel free to give any advice you feel would help.

-- Keith - Bolivar, Missouri, http://www.SquareOneWoodworks.com


9 replies so far

View Wildwood's profile

Wildwood

1882 posts in 1595 days


#1 posted 01-22-2014 07:56 PM

Keith would split the big logs and end seal, just end seal smaller logs. Would store wood in cool dry place out of the weather & direct sunlight.

I would rough turn your bowl blanks, when ready and set aside to dry. Many people end seal their roughed out bowl blanks. I do not.

-- Bill

View Jimbo4's profile

Jimbo4

1432 posts in 2223 days


#2 posted 01-23-2014 01:58 AM

The correct way to “split” the large pieces is with a chain saw. Cut down both sides of the pith/heart to eliminate that part, as that is where the cracking will start when it begins to dry out, then seal both ends.

-- BOVILEXIA: The urge to moo at cows from a moving vehicle.

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Wildwood

1882 posts in 1595 days


#3 posted 01-23-2014 04:48 PM

Safest way to remove the pith from a log using a chain saw is build yourself a sawbuck. Will find many sawbuck designs on line.

I have used both X designed sawbuck and one in the link.

http://web.hypersurf.com/~charlie2/Turning/Chainsawing/Chainsawing2.html

A sawbuck only last me a couple of years before destroy it cutting logs.

No matter which designed sawbuck you use when cutting along the grain on both sides of pith do not want to cut all the way through a log. Would use an axe or wedge to separate pith from halves.

Found it easier and safer to just use my axe or maul to split logs. Pith does not always run straight through a log. If leave little pith on both sides of the log usually just end up turning it away.

-- Bill

View RolfBe's profile

RolfBe

28 posts in 1274 days


#4 posted 01-27-2014 01:34 PM

Bill,
Great link, I was using the ” less slow technique” will use the fastest from now on. I also like the sawbuck.
Thanks

-- "I don't know that I can't, therefore I can" Hawk G4 ss, New Nova 16-24 DVR XP

View Keith Kelly's profile

Keith Kelly

223 posts in 1123 days


#5 posted 01-27-2014 01:51 PM

Thanks for the advice. Also, the sawbuck idea is brilliant.

-- Keith - Bolivar, Missouri, http://www.SquareOneWoodworks.com

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Keith Kelly

223 posts in 1123 days


#6 posted 01-30-2014 08:50 PM

Alright, I may be late, but I sawed up that huge log, and now I have a question for you:

With this log, how can I tell what’s the pith area that I should remove? I feel like I’m going to be cutting away decent bowl material.

(one side of the log has started to check – the side that was facing upward in my truck. Hopefully it’s not too far gone)

and here’s me… confused and not quite sure what this “outdoors” thing is… I’ve been inside too long recovering from wisdom teeth removal and have apparently become a hermit in the process.

-- Keith - Bolivar, Missouri, http://www.SquareOneWoodworks.com

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Wildwood

1882 posts in 1595 days


#7 posted 01-30-2014 09:35 PM

I hope this help explain it better than my rambling and rantings.

http://woodcentral.com/bparticles/log_to_lathe.shtml

-- Bill

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Keith Kelly

223 posts in 1123 days


#8 posted 01-30-2014 10:19 PM

ok, then it looks like I’ve already messed up then! However, that is another helpful link.

-- Keith - Bolivar, Missouri, http://www.SquareOneWoodworks.com

View Wildwood's profile

Wildwood

1882 posts in 1595 days


#9 posted 01-30-2014 11:04 PM

Can still cut away or turn away remaining pitch.

I have stood half log on end and slicing down log with my chain saw removing the pith. That op is not for the faint of heart.

Also trim a half log cutting corners off with a chain saw and mounting on lathe and removed the pith during roughing out.

When splitting logs with an axe or maul often have pith on both halves, Normally just remove it during roughing out a bowl blank.

-- Bill

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