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Need some finishing advice for Dutch tool chest

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Forum topic by Steve Diogo posted 01-21-2014 06:41 PM 1565 views 0 times favorited 9 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Steve Diogo

89 posts in 1054 days


01-21-2014 06:41 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question dutch tool chest finishing question milk paint christopher schwarz

As my first “real” project, I’m building a Dutch tool chest, a la Christopher Schwarz. As you can see from the pics, the parts are complete and I’m ready for assembly and finishing (and I still have to build the tool holders and dividers inside.

Pretty psyched to have gotten this far, especially since I did it 95% with hand tools. I couldn’t figure out how to rip the 30 degree angle on the front and back of the top with a handsaw, so I broke down and used my circ saw for that. Also didn’t have the tools to pull off the tongue and groove for the breadboard, so I used a doweling jig and power drill. Otherwise… all by hand, including the dovetailed bottom and dados for the shelf.

So… looking for advice, votes on how to finish it. “Historically accurate” black/blue milk paint, as Schwarz did, or stain? It’s home center pine, except for the breadboard ends, which are cedar. (odd choice, I know… but it’s what I had handy, and frankly I really didn’t expect it to work out and didnt’ want to waste good wood. The lock mechanism on the inside of the panel is a nice little piece of mahogany I had in the scrap pile.

Going to finish the inside with boiled linseed oil. What do you think about the outside?

Here’s the Woodwright Shop episode I learned about the chest.

-- http://chicagowoodworker.wordpress.com/


9 replies so far

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Steve Diogo

89 posts in 1054 days


#1 posted 01-21-2014 06:45 PM

ps… the carcasse is test assembled with a few brads. I will use period appropriate fasteners and hardware after finishing.

-- http://chicagowoodworker.wordpress.com/

View Smitty_Cabinetshop's profile

Smitty_Cabinetshop

13715 posts in 2080 days


#2 posted 01-21-2014 06:52 PM

Steve, I’d only suggest no heavy-handed stain for your BORG pine. The milk-paint solution is a good one, and you’ll learn a bit if it’s your first time with the stuff. It’s a good look overall, and appropriate as you said.

All that stated, of course, you do what makes you happy. Looks like a great build thusfar, too!

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive --

View Clint Searl's profile

Clint Searl

1533 posts in 1823 days


#3 posted 01-22-2014 01:22 AM

You might as well ruin it all the way and smear BLO on the outside, too.

-- Clint Searl....Ya can no more do what ya don't know how than ya can git back from where ya ain't been

View Steve Diogo's profile

Steve Diogo

89 posts in 1054 days


#4 posted 01-22-2014 09:06 PM

Went with the General Finishes milk paint: 1 part paint to 1.5 water. Clint, thanks for the heads up on the BLO. I read your blog post after seeing your comment. I had never used it, but one of the TV wood dudes was raving about it, so I thought I’d give it a try. Tried it on a test board and it turned a zombie-ish yellow/orange.

-- http://chicagowoodworker.wordpress.com/

View BigRedKnothead's profile

BigRedKnothead

8000 posts in 1444 days


#5 posted 01-22-2014 10:40 PM

^That Clint guy like to drop little nuggets of pessimism throughout the site;)

Outstanding build there Steve. The milk paint looks terrific. I don’t have any experience with that stuff but you guys are getting me interested.

-- "At the end of the day, try and make it beautiful....because the world is full of ugly." Konrad Sauer

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Steve Diogo

89 posts in 1054 days


#6 posted 01-22-2014 11:15 PM

Thanks BigRed. I chose to take his comment as stern encouragement. Really appreciate the compliment. Kind of in love with the GF milk paint, even though I don’t think purists would count this as real milk paint. I used it uncut on a dumpster table I redid and it came out deep, rich and even. Really easy to work. For this I thinned it to get more of a period appropriate look. Can’t decide if I should use poly or wax over it. Have a couple of test boards curing now.

-- http://chicagowoodworker.wordpress.com/

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BigRedKnothead

8000 posts in 1444 days


#7 posted 01-23-2014 01:51 AM

Test boards are the best route to arrive at a finish. Poly would certainly be more durable. If a wipe on satin poly (shop made or not) looks good, you could carry that finish over into the interior. Poly yellows pine a little, but not bad. If left alone, pine will yellow on its own anyway.

-- "At the end of the day, try and make it beautiful....because the world is full of ugly." Konrad Sauer

View Tim's profile

Tim

3112 posts in 1423 days


#8 posted 01-23-2014 07:14 PM

Steve BLO is traditional, but you wouldn’t have wanted it on the inside of your tool chest anyway. In an enclosed space like that it can apparently get pretty stinky when you have that much of it. Kind of goes rancid eventually or something.

View b2rtch's profile

b2rtch

4822 posts in 2510 days


#9 posted 01-23-2014 07:16 PM

Steve, your chest looks very good, good job

-- Bert

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