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Forum topic by mikedpp posted 218 days ago 477 views 0 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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mikedpp

5 posts in 219 days


218 days ago

Topic tags/keywords: router spiral bit pattern routing pattern profile

Good Evening,

I am relatively new with a router but have used it successfully in my woodworking projects for edging. I have been trying to use it for something more complicated and have been having trouble doing so. Basically, I want to use the router to cut a pattern or profile in 1”x3” stock as shown in the attached picture. I have made patterns out of masonite and have tried both straight pattern bits and spiral bits with collars with and without a router table and I just don’t think I know the “secret” to doing this. My last attempt was with a spiral bit and a router table, and I snapped the bit without putting much lateral pressure on the bit.

Please take a look at this picture and tell me how an experienced router user would go about this.

Thanks for your help,

Mike D


11 replies so far

View madts's profile

madts

1247 posts in 972 days


#1 posted 218 days ago

You need to cut away most of the material with a scroll saw or jig saw, then use the router. Maybe in two passes, one at half depth, the other at full depth.

-- Thor and Odin are still the greatest of Gods.

View mark4345's profile

mark4345

55 posts in 1055 days


#2 posted 218 days ago

You will have a hard time cutting that thickness in one go with the pattern bit. to avoid snapping the bit cut the rough profile out first with a bandsaw, scrollsaw, jigsaw, coping saw…whatever to just get you close to the line, then use the pattern bit.

View HerbC's profile

HerbC

1162 posts in 1491 days


#3 posted 218 days ago

+1 on using saw to cut away the bulk of the material.

Good Luck!

Be Careful!

Herb

-- Herb, Florida - Here's why I close most messages with "Be Careful!" http://lumberjocks.com/HerbC/blog/17090

View basswood's profile

basswood

255 posts in 252 days


#4 posted 218 days ago

This is a somewhat different example I am posting here (millwork with stock removal by table saw), but though a bandsaw would be the weapon of choice in your case, the concept is the same:

When making millwork with a router, I remove as much stock as possible before even picking up the router. Here I cut a bevel close to the profile on the table saw first. Then routing goes faster and the results are much cleaner. The router bits also stay sharp much longer. The stock removal step takes no extra time when you factor in the savings of time later.

-- http://www.basswoodmodular.com/Tri-Horse-Builder-Plans-p/thbp.htm

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mikedpp

5 posts in 219 days


#5 posted 218 days ago

From all of your advice, I will proceed with a scroll saw to remove most of the material and then use the router w/table and a template to finish. I will try a straight pattern bit (the one with the roller bearing) or a another spiral bit and a collar to follow the template.

Thanks for the replies.

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mikedpp

5 posts in 219 days


#6 posted 212 days ago

Ok, here is what I did. First I used a scroll saw to remove as much material as possible, which, after some practice, does not take much time. Then I bought a very cheap 1”x30” belt sander from Harbor Freight which was $32 after the sale price and a 20% off coupon. I split the belt in half so that I was only using a 1/2’ wide belt. This enabled me to very effectively remove the remaining material, if any, from the scroll saw cut. It ended up working much better than I expected without the risk of the router flinging my work across the shop.

Mike D

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Dallas

2869 posts in 1119 days


#7 posted 212 days ago

Hint:
If the router bit is throwing your work around you are routing in the wrong direction.

Always move the work against the direction of the bit, otherwise you can get hurt bad and quick.

Left side of the bit, move the work toward you or if handheld router, move the router away.
Right side of the bit, move the work away from you or the handheld router toward you.

-- Improvise.... Adapt...... Overcome!

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mikedpp

5 posts in 219 days


#8 posted 212 days ago

I totally understand and agree, but when routing the shape from my first post, it was hard to not route in the wrong direction.

View Dallas's profile

Dallas

2869 posts in 1119 days


#9 posted 212 days ago

Once your bit is buried in both sides of the wood it doesn’t matter what direction you go.
The caveat is that if you go too deep on a pass and don’t hold against the torque, the work will get away from you.

-- Improvise.... Adapt...... Overcome!

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Dallas

2869 posts in 1119 days


#10 posted 212 days ago

You also need to go against the direction of the grain. If you don’t you are making a climbing cut and there are times for it, but you must be prepared for the torque placed on the workpiece or it will get away from you.

-- Improvise.... Adapt...... Overcome!

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mikedpp

5 posts in 219 days


#11 posted 212 days ago

Duly noted. Thanks for the advice.

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