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How do you reverse a right to left router cut?

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Forum topic by wastedalf posted 01-20-2014 12:55 AM 856 views 0 times favorited 20 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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wastedalf

55 posts in 486 days


01-20-2014 12:55 AM

Topic tags/keywords: safety router

I’ve read a million times… always feed right to left on a router table. So I need some advice. I’m making a bread box, which will have dado joints. The groove is stopped at a certain point, but I don’t know how to do the same groove on the opposite board. A sort-of example picture is below.
I can make the cut that’s on the bottom, but how do I make the cut that’s on the top? The only way my brain works says to feed the piece from the opposite side but I know that’s wrong. How do I tackle this safely? This one task is holding up the whole project.
Thanks in advance.

-- If the iron is blunt, and one does not sharpen the edge, he must use more strength, but wisdom helps one to succeed.


20 replies so far

View JustJoe's profile

JustJoe

1554 posts in 792 days


#1 posted 01-20-2014 12:58 AM

It’s a dado. You’re cutting both sides of the groove at one time. R-L or L-R doesn’t matter. Feeding into the cut applies when you’re cutting an edge.

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lateralus819

1647 posts in 644 days


#2 posted 01-20-2014 01:03 AM

Move the fence?

-- Never confuse mistakes with failure. Kevin

View wastedalf's profile

wastedalf

55 posts in 486 days


#3 posted 01-20-2014 01:04 AM

The fence won’t go far enough. The real board I’m doing is 12 inches wide.

-- If the iron is blunt, and one does not sharpen the edge, he must use more strength, but wisdom helps one to succeed.

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lateralus819

1647 posts in 644 days


#4 posted 01-20-2014 01:12 AM

What i do in a lot of instances, is grab a known straight board for a “guide”. Measure from the outside of the base, to the edge of the bit, and clamp the board, and use it as a reference.

Assuming you can take your router out.

-- Never confuse mistakes with failure. Kevin

View DIYaholic's profile

DIYaholic

14687 posts in 1429 days


#5 posted 01-20-2014 02:25 AM

JustJoe is JustRight….

-- Randy-- I may not be good...but I am slow! If good things come to those who wait.... Why is procrastination a bad thing?

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firefighterontheside

5914 posts in 611 days


#6 posted 01-20-2014 02:36 AM

What Joe said. It doesn’t matter what side you feed from for the dado. The bit is fully in the board so you do not have to worry about the direction the bit is spinning, but it is important to keep the piece tight against the fence. You might want to use a feather board.

-- Bill M. I love my job as a firefighter, but nothing gives me the satisfaction of running my hand over a project that I have built and just finished sanding.

View MatthewG's profile

MatthewG

66 posts in 1533 days


#7 posted 01-20-2014 02:43 AM

I think the direction matters—at least it does from my experience. If the fence is to your right—that is the picture you posted—the rotation of the cutter pushes the board into the fence. This works well, helping to hold the piece to the fence. If you feed with the fence to you left, the cutter will pull the piece AWAY from the fence, which is not terrible, but can cause problems if the piece pulls away from the fence.

JustJoe’s reply is true as far as pulling the piece forward—neither direction has a big difference there.

I will often clamp a block to act as a stop, and then lower the piece onto the bit, just so I can keep the fence to the right. That has the advantage of precisely controlling the end of the dado, too.

-- Matthew, from beautiful Wisconsin USA

View Texcaster's profile

Texcaster

733 posts in 428 days


#8 posted 01-20-2014 02:46 AM

Right to left feed is always wise, it pulls the job to the fence & is non self feed. You want to make a stop cut. The first thing to do is close up the throat opening. Mark the fence so you know where the cut starts & stops.
Mark the job where you want the cut. Don’t try and start the cut at full depth. Engage the cutter a bit and move forward, lowering the job as you go. Repeat until you can safely get the full depth at the start of the cut.

My router table is crude compared many I see here but it gets the job done. Someday. I do most of my work on my shaper.

-- Bill....... " was you dryin' your nails or a wavin' me goodbye?" Tom Waits

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Mark Davisson

511 posts in 2072 days


#9 posted 01-20-2014 02:47 AM

Gotta use a featherboard for the L to R cut.

-- I'm selfless because it feels so good!

View oldnovice's profile

oldnovice

3872 posts in 2122 days


#10 posted 01-20-2014 06:58 PM

Justjoe is correct!
Use a feather board and stops to make it easier on yourself!

The simple rule for using a handheld router is cutting the inside and outside edges of a picture frame:
Rout the outside counter clockwise.
Rout the inside clockwise.

This rule also applies when cutting an edge with a table mounted router.
This rule does not apply when you are not cutting edges with a handheld or table mounted router.

-- "I never met a board I didn't like!"

View Texcaster's profile

Texcaster

733 posts in 428 days


#11 posted 01-20-2014 08:46 PM

Feed direction does matter, otherwise why would you bother with a featherboard and a stop? I’m guessing you want to avoid a cut like this.

A couple of pencil lines is much less setup, bother and safer. It’s pretty standard.

-- Bill....... " was you dryin' your nails or a wavin' me goodbye?" Tom Waits

View JustJoe's profile

JustJoe

1554 posts in 792 days


#12 posted 01-20-2014 09:00 PM

I don’t use a featherboard and I never get cuts like that. I get cuts like this:

I’ve got two hands on the board, only one is pushing it forward, it doesn’t take that much for me to use the other to hold it against the fence – about as much force as it takes to hold a board flat against a jointer fence when I’m running a board through to get a square edge there.

And a stop is used so you know how far to push the board through to get a stopped dado because it’s a bit more accurate than a line drawn on the fence or table, and easier than trying to use calibrated eyeballs to see underneath the board while you’re routing it. :)

-- This Ad Space For Sale! Your Ad Here! Reach a targeted audience! Affordable Rates, easy financing! Contact an ad represenative today at JustJoe's Advertising Consortium.

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wseand

2626 posts in 1796 days


#13 posted 01-20-2014 09:10 PM

Take shallow cuts til you get to the depth your looking for, it will be just fine. Do a few practice turns on a piece of scrap if your leery.

-- Bill - "Freedom flies in your heart like an Eagle" Audie Murphy

View GOOD LUCK TO ALL's profile

GOOD LUCK TO ALL

418 posts in 482 days


#14 posted 01-20-2014 09:11 PM

I got to figure out what I’m doing wrong. :O

View Texcaster's profile

Texcaster

733 posts in 428 days


#15 posted 01-20-2014 09:12 PM

The lines are on the top as well, kind of the whole point.

-- Bill....... " was you dryin' your nails or a wavin' me goodbye?" Tom Waits

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