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Forum topic by TheWoodenOyster posted 01-19-2014 11:26 PM 536 views 0 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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TheWoodenOyster

1034 posts in 681 days


01-19-2014 11:26 PM

Hey guys,

I was wondering if y’all could help me ID this wood. I got it from a friend of a friend whose father cut it down in the 60’s, had it milled, and stored it. There is obviously some pretty intense spalting, which is great, but I cannot figure out what the actual species is. My best guess is sycamore. I have never dealt with sycamore in person, but from what I have seen of grain patterns, that is my best guess. If it helps, the wood is from Tennessee. Also, on the backside of the board, there is a portion of heartwood that is a light pink, and is a little different in color that the pale wood you see in the photos. Picture 2 makes it look kind of like oak, but I can tell for sure it is not. It is pretty close-grained. Let me know what you guys think.

Picture 1: about 1 ft away from the board

Picture 2: about 2 inches away from the board

Picture 3: End grain

Thanks

-- The Wood Is Your Oyster


11 replies so far

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HerbC

1212 posts in 1605 days


#1 posted 01-20-2014 12:04 AM

Sure looks like spalted sycamore to me. I’ve got 1000 bf of it here myself.

Herb

-- Herb, Florida - Here's why I close most messages with "Be Careful!" http://lumberjocks.com/HerbC/blog/17090

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ShaneA

5447 posts in 1344 days


#2 posted 01-20-2014 12:14 AM

I vote Sycamore too.

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gfadvm

11495 posts in 1436 days


#3 posted 01-20-2014 01:48 AM

Spalted sycamore would be my answer as well.

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

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juniorjock

1930 posts in 2511 days


#4 posted 01-20-2014 01:50 AM

THAT is sycamore. Well, I have some sycamore that looks exactly like that anyway.
http://hobbithouseinc.com/personal/woodpics/

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GOOD LUCK TO ALL

418 posts in 473 days


#5 posted 01-20-2014 02:13 AM

spalted beech, beech has a natural pinkish color to it.

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juniorjock

1930 posts in 2511 days


#6 posted 01-20-2014 02:16 AM

I’m not seeing any pinkish.

Edit: Maybe I need to recalibrate my monitor . . . . (seriously).

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GOOD LUCK TO ALL

418 posts in 473 days


#7 posted 01-20-2014 02:18 AM

OP says there is some pinkish in the heartwood, however I’ve never seen any beech that is spalted and usually the pinkish color is pretty consistent, but the second pic shows all the little flecs that look like beech. anyway, just a guess

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GOOD LUCK TO ALL

418 posts in 473 days


#8 posted 01-20-2014 02:24 AM

Just looked at hobbit house at the sycamore, could very well be!

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TheWoodenOyster

1034 posts in 681 days


#9 posted 01-20-2014 04:25 AM

Sounds like sycamore might be dead on. Kevin, I see what you are saying about the grain looking sort of like beech. I bet if you looked at it in person though, you would think otherwise. very similar looking, but the flecks aren’t quite as pronounced as beech.

Thanks guys for the help. I guess I’ll just call it sycamore

-- The Wood Is Your Oyster

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WDHLT15

1210 posts in 1222 days


#10 posted 01-20-2014 04:27 AM

The rays are large and very visible to the naked eye. That makes it either an oak, beech, or sycamore. Beech and sycamore are diffuse porous, with small pores from beginning to the end of the growth ring, all the same size. Oak is ring porous which means that there is an initial band of very large pores at the beginning of the growth ring from fast growth in the spring, and then a band of small pores for slower growth in the summer.

It looks like that there are two distinct pore sizes in the annual growth ring, and that would indicate oak. However, it is a bit hard to make out. If you sand the end grain smooth or slice a section with a sharp razor knife, then we can tell for sure and not be guessing.

-- Danny Located in Perry, GA. Forester. Wood-Mizer LT15 Sawmill. Nyle L53 Dehumidification Kiln. hamsleyhardwood.com

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JayCop

33 posts in 1179 days


#11 posted 01-20-2014 04:29 AM

I built my bench out of spalted beech. I vote that

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