LumberJocks

Planer Boging down

  • Advertise with us

« back to Power Tools, Hardware and Accessories forum

Forum topic by BrianA posted 01-19-2014 03:56 PM 812 views 1 time favorited 41 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View BrianA's profile

BrianA

67 posts in 1685 days


01-19-2014 03:56 PM

Topic tags/keywords: planer planner 110 220 rewire

History

Bought a used 15” Grizzley imitation planer. When I bought it I was running on extension cords in my old shop. When I ran anything thru I could only take off 1/32 or 1/16 max without it bogging down and popping the circuit breaker. Now I have run a separate circuit in my new shop (110) and replaced the cord coming out of the planer with much thicker wire than before. I still can only take of a tiny cut at a time. It slows down but does not pop the circuit like before but will bog down and stop. I need to raise the blade in order for it not to pop the breaker. But this hog should take off at least an 1/8 or more of cherry I am running thru it. I replaced the blades and had the same result.

Question

Could it be wired to run on 220? although the cord was 110? How do I determine if it is wired correctly? The motor really heats up when it is under load. I have not replaced the belts but they do not appear to be slipping under load. This machine should really take off a lot more wood than it does. Not sure what to do?

Thanks

Brian A


41 replies so far

View Loren's profile

Loren

7560 posts in 2303 days


#1 posted 01-19-2014 04:00 PM

It may be running on one hot wire. Sometimes 220 volt
motors can be run at 110 with a considerable decrease
in power.

A 15” planer almost certainly should be wired for 220.

Remove the plate from the motor and there is often a
diagram on the inside. You can post a picture here if
you cannot figure out what you’re looking at from the
diagram.

-- http://lawoodworking.com

View Lee Barker's profile

Lee Barker

2163 posts in 1506 days


#2 posted 01-19-2014 06:01 PM

Quote: “But this hog should take off at least an 1/8 or more of cherry I am running thru it.”

If you’re running 10” wide stock through your machine and everything is right, it will be much happier taking off a sixteenth (not to mention the extended life expectancy of your knives).

That said, the machine has a problem. Loren has exposed a good possibility. I’d also want to be sure all of the rollers are turning properly and that the bed is clean.

Kindly,

Lee

-- "...in his brain, which is as dry as the remainder biscuit after a voyage, he hath strange places cramm'd with observation, the which he vents in mangled forms." --Shakespeare, "As You Like It"

View BrianA's profile

BrianA

67 posts in 1685 days


#3 posted 01-19-2014 06:07 PM

It bogs down running a 3” piece of cherry. Rollers are fine and bed is waxed and all should be good. ” Remove the Plate” is that on the back where I think the run capacitor is? The hump on the top back of the motor?

Brian

View BrianA's profile

BrianA

67 posts in 1685 days


#4 posted 01-19-2014 06:48 PM

Here is the wiring at the motor. Not sure which way it is?

Brian

View exelectrician's profile

exelectrician

1563 posts in 1083 days


#5 posted 01-19-2014 07:46 PM

Look at the diagram. It is wired for 220 and you are only putting 120 on it.

-- Love thy neighbour as thyself

View jonah's profile

jonah

453 posts in 1954 days


#6 posted 01-19-2014 09:22 PM

Without seeing a wiring diagram, I have to say that the motor wiring looks wrong. It’s hard to tell what’s happening from that picture, because the motor ID plate is not all that visible due to the flash.

You said it was hooked up to a 120V outlet?

View mantwi's profile

mantwi

312 posts in 552 days


#7 posted 01-19-2014 09:44 PM

There are different types of 220 plugs. Some have 4 wires, one ground, one neutral and 2 hot. Some have 3 wires, one ground and 2 hots. you have the 3 wire type and changing the plug to a 220 should help. Another cause of the loss of power may be a bad capacitor. I have a shaper that runs but has no torque and bogs down as you have described under load. I intend to replace the run capacitor soon and that should solve the problem.

View Loren's profile

Loren

7560 posts in 2303 days


#8 posted 01-19-2014 09:44 PM

Looks like 220. See how there are 2 wires on the top middle
screw?

You can wire it for 110 and see if it doesn’t trip your
breaker. The wires are probably numbered but keep
notes. Wire 1 seems to be red and #4 white.

Just switch the top wire setup, leave the bottom how
it is now. Then you’ll have it wired for 110 and you
can test your breaker.

-- http://lawoodworking.com

View lepelerin's profile

lepelerin

321 posts in 980 days


#9 posted 01-19-2014 09:49 PM

check the user manual or ask an electrician if you are not sure. From the diagram you should be able to say if it’s wired for 110 or 220. The camera flash on your picture makes it hard to tell how it should be wired.

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

1790 posts in 1149 days


#10 posted 01-19-2014 09:53 PM

I also agree it appears to be wired for 240V service, but the flash washout is definitely a problem. Can I ask: has this ever run with out bogging down since you’ve owned it?

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, we sent 'em to Washington.

View BrianA's profile

BrianA

67 posts in 1685 days


#11 posted 01-19-2014 11:35 PM

I think the diagram is visible on this picture.

Never ran full power.

Not quite sure which wires to move down.

Brian

View jonah's profile

jonah

453 posts in 1954 days


#12 posted 01-20-2014 01:35 AM

Now the writing below the diagram there isn’t legible (at least not to me). Try using an external light source like a lamp (or, preferably, daylight) and taking a picture without the flash. Get as close as your camera/phone will get and still focus properly.

I’m assuming the left picture is labeled “110V” and the right is labeled “220V”. Given that, you are wired for 240V right now. How many amps does it say it’ll draw at each voltage? That part looks scratched up and I can’t read it in either picture. How many HP is the motor? 2? 1.75?

View mantwi's profile

mantwi

312 posts in 552 days


#13 posted 01-20-2014 01:47 AM

I forgot to tell you that although a motor wired for 220 will run poorly on 110 and it will quickly overheat and burn out.

View BrianA's profile

BrianA

67 posts in 1685 days


#14 posted 01-20-2014 02:02 AM

It does not say how many amps it will draw on the label. The label says 110V and the right is labeled 220V

Which wires do I need to move to to get it to run on 110?

Thanks
Brian

View Loren's profile

Loren

7560 posts in 2303 days


#15 posted 01-20-2014 02:21 AM

Put the black wire and red wire together on the left pole.

Put the yellow wire and white wire together on the right
pole.

Run the motor. If it runs the wrong direction, switch the
position of the black and yellow wires.

-- http://lawoodworking.com

showing 1 through 15 of 41 replies

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

GardenTenders.com :: gardening showcase