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Broken Grizzly Dust Cyclone

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Forum topic by jonsprague0000 posted 01-19-2014 12:04 PM 1082 views 0 times favorited 24 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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jonsprague0000

32 posts in 244 days


01-19-2014 12:04 PM

Topic tags/keywords: grizzly dust collector dust cyclone

I purchased a G0703P 1-1/2 HP Cyclone Dust Collector – Polar Bear Series and attempted to convert it to 220V. I missed a major step and the dust collector does not turn on anymore. Does anyone know how I can get the dust collector working again? I would appreciate any suggestions because I’m hoping I didn’t just destroy the electronics in my dust collector.

Details:
I rewired the dust collector to 220V following the directions, connected a 6-15 plug, and plugged it into a 220V outlet. I turned it on and it ran for a few seconds and then shut off. Now the dust collector does not turn on anymore. I realized I missed the major step of installing the 220V conversion kit. I’m guessing I blew something on the 110V board that comes with the dust collector.

Some options that I am considering: – Buying the 220V conversion kit and hoping the new board will work? – Is there a fuse or something on the current board that I might need to replace?


24 replies so far

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

1790 posts in 1148 days


#1 posted 01-19-2014 01:01 PM

In looking at the schematics of 120V versus 240V it’s not clear what would be in the “comversion kit”, though I did note the reference about the “qualified electrician”. I think first I would change it back to 120V and see if it runs. Second I’d call Griz tech service and ask them. But that’s just me…..

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, we sent 'em to Washington.

View becikeja's profile

becikeja

311 posts in 1468 days


#2 posted 01-19-2014 02:18 PM

If they offer a 220V conversion kit, then we have to assume the motor is dual rated. It would not make sense to replace the motor on the conversion. This leads me to believe you have a blown capacitor. Not being familiar with the unit you will have to take these comments as clues and do a little research. The motor most likely has a starting capacitor between the power source and the motor. Again based on this unit being dual rated I would assume this one is rated for at least 220V which would indicate this is not your problem but you can easily check on the nameplate. If it is a 120V cap it is most likely blown. You can test it easy enough using an ohm meter. Just make sure to discharge the cap before you try it. These things can have a punch. If you have continuity across the cap terminals then it’s blown. You should see the needle on your meter jump and then dissipate to an open circuit, that would indicate it is most likely ok. Not a fool proof way to check it, but these things are usually good or bad, seldom an in-between state.

Most likely the conversion kit has to do with the control board. With that said I would have to assume that a 120V rated capacitor on the board blew. You can just replace the cap for a couple of bucks and get it running at 120V again, or as you stated purchase the 220V kit and replace the 120V rated parts. To verify look on the board. You will either have disc caps or barrel caps. If they are disk you will see one blown apart, pretty easy to tell. Pull it out and from the schematics see what its farad rating is and solder a new one in. If they are barrel look at the tops of each cap. A blown barrel cap will pop up. Kinda like opening a new can of stain. again just solder a new one in. This will get it back to 120V. In years past you could take these to radio shack and they actually stocked capacitors and could test them for you. Not anymore. the only place I know that even sells them in stores now a days is Fry’s

I can’t stress enough. Before testing the caps make sure to discharge them. disconnect all the wires and put a well insulated screw driver across the terminals. it will spark and pop if it’s charged but better to electrocute the screw driver than you. This will not hurt the capacitor.

Good news is, I doubt you damaged any expensive parts. Good luck.

-- Don't outsmart your common sense

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jonsprague0000

32 posts in 244 days


#3 posted 01-19-2014 05:58 PM

Thanks for the replies. I tried to downgrade the wiring to 120V and the collector still does not turn on. I am going to call Grizzly tomorrow and ask them if they have seen this issue.

Becikeja, thanks for the detailed response. The circuit board has components that are rated for 120V so I think you are correct about the circuit board being the issue. The motor is dual rated so that is good news. I visually checked the capacitors and none appear to be blown, however, I haven’t checked them with a meter.

The 220V conversion kit is basically a new control unit, but unfortunately it costs $250 (http://www.grizzly.com/products/220V-Conversion-Kit-for-G0703/T25513). I would hate to have to buy. Next time I’ll read the directions better.

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jonsprague0000

32 posts in 244 days


#4 posted 01-19-2014 06:02 PM

Becikeja, the power lights are not coming on. Could this be caused by the capacitor or would the capacitor more likely just not let the motor start? I know this is a hard question to answer since you can’t physically look at the grizzly. I don’t have experience in electronics so this is new territory for me.

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becikeja

311 posts in 1468 days


#5 posted 01-19-2014 07:49 PM

The power light is probably powered from the control board. $250 sounds high for a conversion kit.
The starting capacitor is used to regulate the power to the motor to keep the inrush current from tripping the circuit. It all depends how they tapped the wire for the power light. I would have to see it. I sure would ask grizzly exactly what I get in the conversion kit.

-- Don't outsmart your common sense

View darthford's profile

darthford

532 posts in 579 days


#6 posted 01-20-2014 04:00 PM

The 220 conversion kit replaces the 110 board altogether so if you damaged it meh no big deal.

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darthford

532 posts in 579 days


#7 posted 01-20-2014 04:01 PM

PS a 15 amp breaker won’t cut it on 220 that thing pulls a ton of amps on start up.

View jonah's profile

jonah

453 posts in 1954 days


#8 posted 01-20-2014 10:57 PM

Breakers are meant to allow short-duration spikes in amperage when AC motors start up. All motors draw a ton of amps on startup (my table saw, for example, spiked as high as 65amps once). It only lasts for a few fractions of a second, so no appreciable amount of heat builds up in the wires, breaker, or receptacles.

A 1.5HP dust collector can be run fine on a 15amp breaker. It likely draws ~8-10amps at 240V. You’d be better off with a 20A breaker, but if you only have 14AWG wire feeding the receptacle, that isn’t an option.

Keep in mind that there are plenty of 1.5HP tools that run on 120VAC. Most are probably slightly overrated in power, but they tend to be quite useable on 15A breakers, and that’s at 120VAC, mind you. Bumping up to 240VAC halves the amperage used, so there’s no way it’s getting close to 15amps.

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becikeja

311 posts in 1468 days


#9 posted 01-21-2014 12:01 PM

I just now had time to look over at the link you sent. Very nice dust collector. Looking it over and seeing how the board is wired in, I would be very surprised if you damaged anything other than the control board. After modifying with the correct control board you should be fine. As far as the feeder breaker is concerned, Jonah is right. You don’t want to size the breaker for the inrush current, sometimes that can reach as much as 13 times your rated current and that’s why you have a starting capacitor. You want to size it for the max full load current. On your motor you should see a FLA rating. FLA stands for Full Load Amps or current. For a 1.5HP motor at 220volts it should be about 10 amps. So theoretically you could use a 10 amp breaker. Now the fun part. Breaker ampere sizes are sometimes a little misleading. They are sized based on open air testing. Last time I checked they are usually located in a panel and mounted next to other breakers generating heat. With that said never size a breaker over 80% of it’s full load use. So in your case 12.5 Amps. Since there is no such thing as a 12.5Amp breaker you need to push up to the 15A. That would be the minimum. I would recommend bumping to 20A if you can that will give you a little buffer. Double check your wire size if you have #14 or #12 which I assume you do, you will be fine. The NC code tables allow you to go 20Amps on size #14 wire. http://www.houwire.com/products/technical/article310_16.html
Let me know how it turns out.
That is a great looking dust collector. I’m jealous

-- Don't outsmart your common sense

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jonsprague0000

32 posts in 244 days


#10 posted 01-21-2014 06:49 PM

I’m using a dedicated 20A breaker with 10-3 wire so I don’t think the power will be an issue. I am going to call Grizzly today after work. Most likely I’ll end up buying the 220V kit since I don’t have much experience in changing out capacitors. I’ll let you know what they say.
Thanks again for all the feedback.

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becikeja

311 posts in 1468 days


#11 posted 01-21-2014 08:26 PM

220V – 20A with 10/3 wire – you will have no electrical issues running that beast

-- Don't outsmart your common sense

View jonah's profile

jonah

453 posts in 1954 days


#12 posted 01-21-2014 11:33 PM

14AWG is rated for 15A maximum per the codes I know. That includes the NEC as well as the state code here. I would not go by a random wire manufacturer’s website with something like this.

View REO's profile

REO

614 posts in 729 days


#13 posted 01-22-2014 12:31 PM

The 14,12,and 10 AWG are asterisked with a note at the bottom of the page. Standard load factors are stated.

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jonsprague0000

32 posts in 244 days


#14 posted 01-22-2014 04:05 PM

I called Grizzly technical support and they said all I needed was the P0703P088 – CIRCUIT BOARD 220V 256 CODE which is $66 This was the original part that I was supposed to install to convert to 220V. I just purchased the part and hoping this is all I need.

This is a lot cheaper than the complete control box the Grizzly salesman told me I needed. The control box was more expensive and also included the remote control circuit board, etc. Hopefully, I didn’t fry that also.

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

1790 posts in 1148 days


#15 posted 01-22-2014 05:21 PM

Sounds like you lucked out. Hope the installation goes smoothly for you.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, we sent 'em to Washington.

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