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age of window?

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Forum topic by fumehappy posted 190 days ago 388 views 0 times favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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fumehappy

105 posts in 851 days


190 days ago

Hello, hoping with some with more historical restoration knowledge can help out. This window was removed from a 19th century building, wondering if it could be 18th century. Corners are wooden pegged, glass originally held in with small square nails. Mullens mortise in and wedged. The installation method in the building was haphazard and I know it didn’t start life there…. thanks!


12 replies so far

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fumehappy

105 posts in 851 days


#1 posted 190 days ago

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Ben

302 posts in 930 days


#2 posted 190 days ago

Hard to tell without a picture, but I work in architectural antiques and could probably give you a rough idea.

-- Welcome to downtown Coolsville, Population: US! --Hogarth Hughes

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fumehappy

105 posts in 851 days


#3 posted 190 days ago

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fumehappy

105 posts in 851 days


#4 posted 190 days ago

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fumehappy

105 posts in 851 days


#5 posted 190 days ago

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JustJoe

1554 posts in 637 days


#6 posted 190 days ago

The key to dating will be the type and size of glass panes (if it’s original) and the muntin shape. and (if applicable) the counterweight mechanisms. There are a few guides out there somewhere on the internet. I thought Old House Journal had something but I didn’t see it in a quick search. Here is a good piece frm a historical society. Page 2 has a chart of muntin shapes. It won’t get you an exact date but might get you in the ballpark.

http://www.historic-albany.org/docs/WoodWindowRepairHandbook.pdf

-- This Ad Space For Sale! Your Ad Here! Reach a targeted audience! Affordable Rates, easy financing! Contact an ad represenative today at JustJoe's Advertising Consortium.

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fumehappy

105 posts in 851 days


#7 posted 190 days ago

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Ben

302 posts in 930 days


#8 posted 190 days ago

I would say 19th century, maybe early. The construction style is actually common for that type of window, but I’m not sure how far back. As far as the haphazard installation, You would be surprised at some of the things I’ve seen in old houses. Nobody wants to pay to have something done if they think they can diy, and some people just… shouldn’t. Even back then.

-- Welcome to downtown Coolsville, Population: US! --Hogarth Hughes

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Tom148

39 posts in 863 days


#9 posted 190 days ago

I just had a commission to repair 15 sashes that a squirrel did a number on. Nasty little bugger! The building was an 1898 log cabin that had windows that date to around 1920 to 1940 although some of the sashes were obviously repurposed from a bit earlier. These were all dry fit mortise and Tenon including the muntins. From the pictures your window looks very similar in construction. The rail and stile tenon looks a little different but that could be a local manufacturer thing. There is a lot of glass there and it looks to uniform to be much before 1900 but it is tough to tell from pictures. Window construction didn’t change much for a long time but the glass gives a clue

-- Tom

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fumehappy

105 posts in 851 days


#10 posted 190 days ago

Additional note.. The vertical mutton were mortise and wedged at the top and wooden pegged at the bottom. Also the bottom mortise are dovetailed

Also please note the large hole and groove in one of the previous pictures. ... does that mean the window tilts out or is this just one sash from a gigantic window?

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rjpat

25 posts in 577 days


#11 posted 189 days ago

That sash does look very similar to the ones in my house, which was built in 1837

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fumehappy

105 posts in 851 days


#12 posted 188 days ago

Well after some additional research, It would appear to me that this is indeed one sash, not a fixed picture window. The grooves on the sides followed by the hole is where the cord/chain would have fastened. The great news is that the other half of the window is available, and I’m picking it up tomorrow morning :)
There appears to be two types of glass in this window… some are thicker than others. I’m guessing it was partially re-glazed at some point. I have successfully disassembled this one, and will start the cleaning and restoration process shortly. Still debating the soy stripper vs. heat stripping, but I’m going to go with linseed oil based stuff for the finish.

Thanks for all the replies. I think based on them and the type of nails used, I’m going to call it 1840’s.
Thanks!
~Fumey

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