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Forum topic by gsff19 posted 01-12-2014 10:13 PM 833 views 1 time favorited 13 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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gsff19

8 posts in 1446 days


01-12-2014 10:13 PM

I am trying to make a Jewelry box and a poker chip box. However I’m having trouble getting my corners 45 degrees on my table saw. I have the blade set at 45 degrees and I can’t keep the cuts equal. I’m very new at this so any input is helpful.

Thanks


13 replies so far

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patron

13535 posts in 2801 days


#1 posted 01-12-2014 10:22 PM

take a parallel straight piece of wood
maybe a foot or so
and crosscut it at your 45 angle
(about 3” from the end
so you have more to keep trying)

flip one piece to make a corner
and check it with a good square
if the angle is not 90

adjust the miter to suit
till the 90* one comes true

-- david - only thru kindness can this world be whole . If we don't succeed we run the risk of failure. Dan Quayle

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JustJoe

1554 posts in 1498 days


#2 posted 01-12-2014 10:56 PM

What do you mean by “equal”? Is one side 45, and then another time it comes out at 46, and another 48? Or is it some other problem like the first board comes out 6” and the opposite side comes out 6.25”? And what is your technique – are you using a crosscut sled, trying to hold that thin lip against a fence for the second edge, freehanding it whiile holding against a miter gauge? And what type of saw are you using?

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gsff19

8 posts in 1446 days


#3 posted 01-12-2014 11:05 PM

Thanks for the advice, does anyone have good plans for those boxes, not using finger joints?

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MrFid

804 posts in 1364 days


#4 posted 01-12-2014 11:14 PM

Same questions as Joe for your original question. Pictures are always helpful. There are lots of ways to make boxes. Search this site for boxes and you’ll see plenty of experts. For a good basic tutorial, I’d try Doug Stowe’s book ‘Basic Box Making,’ which can be found here: http://www.amazon.com/Basic-Box-Making-Doug-Stowe/dp/1561588520/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1389568242&sr=8-3&keywords=box+making+stowe or perhaps at your local library. Very helpful.

-- Bailey F - Eastern Mass.

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Jim Finn

2408 posts in 2382 days


#5 posted 01-13-2014 03:23 PM

I make boxes 15-20 at a time and I cut the mitered corners on my compound sliding miter saw. I tilt the blade to 45 degree stop and cut to length with the side of the box (to be) laying flat on the saw bed.

-- "You may have your PHD but I have my GED and my DD 214"

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gsff19

8 posts in 1446 days


#6 posted 01-13-2014 04:13 PM

I am using a 10inch ryobi contractor saw with a 60 tooth blade on it. I have a dewalt mitre saw I could try as well. I put one box together and noticed some of the pieces stick out on the corners. For some reason one side is a little shorter/longer than the other. The finish demeans ions for the box I’m tryin to make are 10 1/2 long and 7 1/2 wide. I’m just confuse where to start cutting to make those measurements. Do I start at 10 1/2 inches?

Thanks.

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JustJoe

1554 posts in 1498 days


#7 posted 01-13-2014 05:05 PM

So the problem isn’t the 45 angle, it’s the measurement or the straightness.
If you’re doing it on a tablesaw then each side has two edges cut at a 45. You cut the first one with a flat-side against the fence and all is good. Then you flip it around to cut the other side 45 and now the first side you cut is riding against the fence and all you have is that one sharp little edge. That’s hard enough with a quality saw. With a Ryobi which has the structural integrity of jello and a fence better suited for an erector set, it would be magic.

Your miter saw with stop-blocks would be easiest. Work in pairs of opposite sides since those have to be the same length. 10.5, 10.55, 10.45 doesn’t matter as long as they end up exact. Cut a 45 on one edge of each of the two opposing sides, then use a stop-block along the back of the miter saw to layout the cut on the second edge. That will ensure both opposing sides end up the same length. And since you just have to hold the piece flat along the back fence of the miter saw, you won’t get the flexing or twisting that causes the uneven cuts on the TS.

Or, if you are determined to use the tablesaw, make a crosscut sled and use the same method of work – two opposing sides at a time, one cut on each, flip them around and use a stop-block.

Hope that makes sense, good luck.

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gsff19

8 posts in 1446 days


#8 posted 01-13-2014 05:19 PM

Ok thanks one more question after I make the first cut, how do I know where to place the stop block? And how to I know where to start the second cut?

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JustJoe

1554 posts in 1498 days


#9 posted 01-13-2014 06:01 PM

start with two opposing sides cut approximately to length but slightly oversized. They dont’ have to be equal length at this stage of the game.

Take your crosscut sled, and the sawblade set at a 45 degree angle.

If you’re using a miter saw then do step one, and for step 2 go ahead and set your miter at 45.
to be continued…

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JustJoe

1554 posts in 1498 days


#10 posted 01-13-2014 06:03 PM

step 3. Using the sled, cut one edge of each side to the 45. No need for blocks or anything, just hold it tight against the back fence and cut just enough off one side to get the 45. If doing this on the miter saw, hold it upright against the back fence.

Now you have one side cut. Note that in mine the boards are still uneven length. It doesn’t matter, live with it.

to be continued…

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JustJoe

1554 posts in 1498 days


#11 posted 01-13-2014 06:10 PM

Step 3.5: If you’re not great at measuring, then start with three pieces – two good sides and a scrap piece of pine or mdf the same thickness as the other two.

step 4 – set up the stopblock to cut the second edge. My two scraps are just long enough to make each one 6.5” so that’s what I’m using in the pics. My blade is tilted to the left so I am going to put my board on the right side. My blade is up just high enough to cut through the board. I measure over 6.5” and put the block in place.

Step 4.5 clamp the block of course.

to be continued…

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JustJoe

1554 posts in 1498 days


#12 posted 01-13-2014 06:18 PM

step 5. Take one of the pieces and set it on the sled with the cut edge up against the block. Make sure you orient the side so that the bevel you already cut is facing down.

Step 5.5 If you really suck at measuring or don’t trust your self/ruler/saw then instead of cutting the first side, take that 3rd scrap test piece. Move the block out a bit farther than you think you need and make a test cut. See how much longer the board is than you want it, and move the block that much closer and take a second test cut. Do that until you creep up on the exact length you want the sides to be. Then go do step 5 with the real thing.

Step 6. After you cut side one, just repeat step 5 with the opposite side and you will end up with two perfectly equal parts.

to be continued…

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JustJoe

1554 posts in 1498 days


#13 posted 01-13-2014 06:21 PM

And that is it. It took 30 minutes longer to explain than to do.
If you’re using a miter saw instead of a crosscut sled, the steps are the same but you’re using the back edge of the saw to rest the side against and the board is upright.

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