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15 Gauge nailer, ~25 or 34~36 degree?

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Forum topic by WillTheEngineer posted 01-08-2014 11:35 AM 9747 views 0 times favorited 20 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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WillTheEngineer

67 posts in 2355 days


01-08-2014 11:35 AM

Topic tags/keywords: 15 gauge finish nailer

I’ve been looking at a 15 gauge finish nailer, Bostitch seems to make a great one, as well as Hitachi. However I like the Oil-less Bostitch. So my ? Is, what angle the FN or DA (25 or ~35 degree). Anyone have any experience with one or both angle style nailers? Any issues trying to find the nails for one or the other?

Thanks

25degree

http://www.amazon.com/BOSTITCH-N62FNK-2-15-Gauge-4-Inch-2-Inch/dp/B00004RJXI/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1389179575&sr=8-2&keywords=15+gauge+nailer

35 degree

http://www.amazon.com/Bostitch-DA1564K-Angled-Finish-Nailer/dp/B0069U2D96/ref=sr_1_7?ie=UTF8&qid=1389180839&sr=8-7&keywords=15+gauge+nailer


20 replies so far

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WillTheEngineer

67 posts in 2355 days


#1 posted 01-08-2014 02:58 PM

Seems like the two major nail makes are Bostitch n Hitachi, Bostitch making 25 deg n Hitachi making 34 deg.

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WillTheEngineer

67 posts in 2355 days


#2 posted 01-09-2014 02:42 PM

I contacted Bostitch, and they stated that their was no difference in the nail head between the FN and DA, that they manufacture. However there seems to be variations among manufactures. I’m going to try and do some more research, n list finding here, so that others will have some information. There’s really some confusion among people on these 15 gauge nailers.

Bostitch also stated that they just came out with them hitting the shelves end of 2012 & beginning of 2013, there was an Oring production issue, but that has since been fixed.

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wseand

2754 posts in 2508 days


#3 posted 01-09-2014 03:17 PM

It appears that the DA model it specifically designed for base boards, molding, etc., HERE

The FN appears to be designed for cabinetry and furniture, staircases. HERE

It really looks like the difference is minimal. The main difference, drive power, nail capacity, and angle.

I prefer Porter Cable, but have SENCO, and Bostitch nailers of different shapes and sizes as well.

-- Bill - "Freedom flies in your heart like an Eagle" Audie Murphy

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basswood

261 posts in 1087 days


#4 posted 01-09-2014 03:58 PM

There is little difference in performance or application, the nails are the same gauge and have the same head and range of lengths.

The 25º guns will hold about 25 more nails than 34º guns, only important in a production environment.

The 34º nailers are more common, so it can be a little easier to find fasteners and they reach into corners a little better.

The Hitachi used to be the only one with a blow gun feature, but I think Bostitch picked that idea up and added LED lights, which can be nice in dark interior closets, etc.

Another gun to consider is the DeWalt.

-- http://www.basswoodmodular.com/Tri-Horse-Builder-Plans-p/thbp.htm

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WillTheEngineer

67 posts in 2355 days


#5 posted 01-09-2014 07:32 PM

From what I’ve been reading, Bostitch and older Makita use the 25deg. I’m not for sure if the industry is slowly moving to 34deg. I was going to pick up a Bostitch FN local, but not for sure if it will be phased out. With a bigger selection of 34° nails, maybe ordering Bostitch DA is the way to go?

It’d be used for house work, as well as woodworking…

Looking yesterday, I have noticed some head differences with the manufactures.

Anyone have any positive or negative experience with the 34~36° or 25° nailers or nails?

Thanks for the help.

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wseand

2754 posts in 2508 days


#6 posted 01-09-2014 11:56 PM

Senco and Porter Cable are better Guns. IMO I’ve been using them for years. I have heard the Bostitch piston will bend when it hits a nail or stud guard.

The difference in guns are they are designed for different jobs, it’s a preference thing. The only thing you need to figure out is what you are using it for. They are tools for Finish Carpenters and Cabinet makers. just like a Framing Guns are for Framers.

The 34 Degs. is a steeper pitch so you can nail into the 2×4 easier on a Base board or crown molding, etc. Company’s design things based off feedback from contractors and professionals.

-- Bill - "Freedom flies in your heart like an Eagle" Audie Murphy

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MT_Stringer

2854 posts in 2698 days


#7 posted 01-10-2014 12:04 AM

I am just a hobbyist and don’t do a lot of finish nailing. I bought a Harbor Freight 15 ga nailer – 34 deg. I haven’t had any problems. In fact, a friend borrowed it to put down baseboards in his house. Pretty economical gun for occasional use.

-- Handcrafted by Mike Henderson - Channelview, Texas

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wseand

2754 posts in 2508 days


#8 posted 01-10-2014 12:23 AM

Hell you could buy 2 Central Pneumatic for the price of one of others. You can get real lucky or real unlucky at HF, well worth the chance for some tools.

-- Bill - "Freedom flies in your heart like an Eagle" Audie Murphy

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WillTheEngineer

67 posts in 2355 days


#9 posted 01-10-2014 03:42 PM

For future reference,

-Bostitch and Porter Cable (cardboard box) nail heads are oval..
-Hitach, Senco, and Porter Cable (clear plastic container) nail heads are “D” shaped or indented for the lower nail shaft.

-All are two sided chisel style points

*Note, some of the shafts on the Hitachi’s were oval shaped (cross section).

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WillTheEngineer

67 posts in 2355 days


#10 posted 01-10-2014 03:53 PM

I think I’m going to go with the DA style (~34°), I’ll be using it for caucus, and odd jobs. I have an 18 gauge for trim & face frame work.

With the larger selection and availability of nails, it seems to be the best choice. Not for sure if the steeper angle develops more jams or issues, but is seems like the better choice.

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basswood

261 posts in 1087 days


#11 posted 01-10-2014 04:04 PM

Senco claims their nails offer the greatest pull out resistance.

I have found no appreciable difference in the function of the heads, though their geometry may differ slightly.

An important note on the chisel points, on 15 ga nailers they are collated so the cutting action of the points is perpendicular to the gun magazine. This minimizes splitting when the long axis of the nailer is oriented with the long axis of a board. This way the chisel points cut the wood fibers rather than wedging them apart. This is especially important to keep in mind near the end of pieces of wood.

Nailing solid wood edging to ply wood if the gun is held perpendicular rather than parallel, the nails will tend to curl up and blow out of the plys.

Note that the nails for smaller ga finish nailers have cutting action in line with the long axis of the guns, so the opposite applies. 16 ga and smaller nailers should be held perpendicular to the grain when nailing, for best results.

The moral, know your chisel point orientations and use them to your benefit.

Ignoring this basic information and holding nailers improperly during nailing is the most common mistake I see in trim carpentry.

-- http://www.basswoodmodular.com/Tri-Horse-Builder-Plans-p/thbp.htm

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b2rtch

4823 posts in 2515 days


#12 posted 01-10-2014 04:21 PM

basswood, thank you for the information.
I use HF guns, they are good enough for me but often I problem with the nail following the fibers and popping out.

“Nailing solid wood edging to ply wood if the gun is held perpendicular rather than parallel, the nails will tend to curl up and blow out of the plys.”

could explain that “better”?
Tahnks

-- Bert

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Loren

8314 posts in 3114 days


#13 posted 01-10-2014 04:34 PM

I have a Hitachi. Never had problems getting nails for it
at Home Depot, at least in the 3 or 4 most common
lengths.

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WillTheEngineer

67 posts in 2355 days


#14 posted 01-10-2014 05:58 PM

b2rtch ““Nailing solid wood edging to ply wood if the gun is held perpendicular rather than parallel, the nails will tend to curl up and blow out of the plys.”

could explain that “better”?”

The nail tips or point, is a two faced chisel, with a flat point (instead of a more rounded center point, or multiple edge chisel point). If that flat is parallel to the wood fibers or plywood layers, you have a chance of the nail tip acting as a one sided wedge (usually due to the wood grain/fiber being more dense on one side of the 15 gauge nail) and turning or guiding the tip to one side.

Hope that helps…

I didn’t intend to confuse people with this post, I was just trying to have a reference to the confusion already out there.

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shopdog

576 posts in 2952 days


#15 posted 01-10-2014 06:34 PM

I have a 15ga senco. It does what I want it to. Uses DA nails. Never had a problem.

Last year, I saw 2 boxes of bostitch nails at a flea market They are aluminum…1.5” and 2”...about 3500 nails per box. I do a lot of exterior work, and always use stainless nails, but aluminum would work well outside, so I bought them for a decent price…not realizing that they are FN, and didn’t fit in my gun.
If there is anyone reading this message that would like to buy them, that would be great.
Message me if you’re interested.

-- Steve-- http://www.urbanexteriors.biz

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