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Epoxy Threads on a bottle stopper?

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Forum topic by Dan Campebell posted 225 days ago 480 views 0 times favorited 8 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Dan Campebell

36 posts in 1792 days


225 days ago

Topic tags/keywords: bottle stoppers epoxy glue threading end grain

I have been exploring the possibilities of turning bottle stoppers and find the procedure pretty straight forward however; I find the procedure of using CA glue in the treaded hole to be pretty “iffy”.
The stoppers I am using are high quality and the hole is as recommended (9/32” bit with a 3/8 – 16 tap)....... What I find to be a problem is that many of the nicer wood will not take threads very well at all (especially in the end grain). I believe 2 part epoxy might be the best solution. I would appreciate any suggestions anyone might have on this.

Thanks, Dan Campbell

-- Dan Campbell


8 replies so far

View crank49's profile

crank49

3366 posts in 1595 days


#1 posted 225 days ago

Do you want it to be removable?
Are you talking gluing a threaded stud into a hole (that’s pretty permanent), or actually cutting threads into the glue?
CA wood glue is designed to be absorbed into the wood pores and then set up; hardening the wood fibers themselves. Epoxy is more of a surface adhesive bonding two materials together. They both work well, but in different ways..

-- Michael :-{| “If you tell a big enough lie and tell it frequently enough, it will be believed.” ― A H

View oldnovice's profile (online now)

oldnovice

3683 posts in 1992 days


#2 posted 225 days ago

You might be able to find a threaded plastic sleeve that you can glue on the wooden portion of the stopper. Or use pre-threaded brass rod as part of the stopper … maybe some stainless steel too????

If the stopper are going to be on bottles that hold drinking liquids I would be concerned by both the epoxy and the CA glue.

-- "I never met a board I didn't like!"

View exelectrician's profile

exelectrician

1519 posts in 1052 days


#3 posted 225 days ago

Go online and buy a machine tap – they are quite different from hand taps, the cutting edges are razor sharp.
They cut hardwood threads perfectly. I use my taps in a cordless drill on slow speed.
Go in slowly without stopping, the edges are designed to slice the material in continuous curls.
Then back out the tap with your drill in reverse
In many cases the machine tap actually cost less than a set of hand taps.
When I discovered that they were available, I switched and have never used a hand tap since!

-- Love thy neighbour as thyself

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exelectrician

1519 posts in 1052 days


#4 posted 225 days ago

Go online and buy a machine tap – they are quite different from hand taps, the cutting edges are razor sharp.
They cut hardwood threads perfectly. I use my taps in a cordless drill on slow speed.
Go in slowly without stopping, the edges are designed to slice the material in continuous curls.
Then back out the tap with your drill in reverse
In many cases the machine tap actually cost less than a set of hand taps.
When I discovered that they were available, I switched and have never used a hand tap since!

-- Love thy neighbour as thyself

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exelectrician

1519 posts in 1052 days


#5 posted 225 days ago

http://www.mscdirect.com/product/40214462

Here is the link for the right type of spiral point machine tap to solve your problem. Enjoy!

-- Love thy neighbour as thyself

View oldnovice's profile (online now)

oldnovice

3683 posts in 1992 days


#6 posted 225 days ago

I was under the impression you were looking for external threads, not internal!

The tap indicated by exelectrician should do the trick as I have done that in hard maple with as small as 6×32 tap with good results!

-- "I never met a board I didn't like!"

View Guy Belleman's profile

Guy Belleman

18 posts in 242 days


#7 posted 212 days ago

Guess I don’t understand the difference between a machine tap and a hand tap. The set of hand taps and dies I have look just like the one on the MSC site.

Please confirm that the drill hole for the 3/8” tap is 1/4”

exelectrician has just solved some of the my own problems with threading the stopper. Thanks.

View RogerInColorado's profile

RogerInColorado

290 posts in 579 days


#8 posted 212 days ago

I use a threaded insert in stopper blanks and some other things. Running the threaded insert into the blank before you start turning lets you use a cut-off carriage bolt as a mandrel while you are turning it and makes it easy to install the hardware. I use a brass insert so there is no rust risk. If you use the insert, you can remover the hardware as many times as you like to throw it into the dishwasher and never have to worry about wear and tear on the wood blank. Makes your “customer” feel good about no bugs stuck under the sealing parts. I buy the inserts from McMaster-Carr in bags of 50 or so. That way I always have them and they are less expensive than a hardware store or home center.

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