LumberJocks

Why is my orbital sander leaving marks on Iroko end grain cutting board?

  • Advertise with us

« back to Finishing forum

Forum topic by BigDaddy2121 posted 01-06-2014 03:05 PM 827 views 0 times favorited 18 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View BigDaddy2121's profile

BigDaddy2121

10 posts in 331 days


01-06-2014 03:05 PM

Topic tags/keywords: iroko hardwood question purpleheart teak sander sanding finishing

Hey folks – I am fairly new to woodworking and am making an end grain cutting board. I am using Purpleheart and Iroko for the cutting board. While doing some sanding (using 80 grit) with my orbital sander, I noticed the Iroko wood getting circular black marks all throughout. It did not occur on the Purpleheart and I am trying to understand why?

I was unable to remove the marks via sanding with 120 grit, so I am going to go ahead and invest in a nice hand planer to take a small amount of the surface. I have a nice Makita planer but have read some horror stories about putting end grain wood through a planer.

I really am just trying to learn why this happened in order to avoid making the same mistake twice. Does anyone know why those markings would have occurred in the Iroko wood?

I also have pictures if needed.

Thanks


18 replies so far

View Woodendeavor's profile

Woodendeavor

216 posts in 1258 days


#1 posted 01-06-2014 03:27 PM

A picture is worth a thousand words

View BigDaddy2121's profile

BigDaddy2121

10 posts in 331 days


#2 posted 01-06-2014 06:00 PM

Hopefully, I posted this pic correctly. If so, you can see the streaks that the orbital sander has made.

View PurpLev's profile

PurpLev

8476 posts in 2300 days


#3 posted 01-06-2014 06:07 PM

I am not sure what you refer to, but 80grit is fairly course paper and can leave deep scratch marks. that said, from your description it sounds like you are referring to burning marks more than gouges/scratches. if so, it may be that your sander is producing a lot of heat which the Iroko is more sensitive to than the purpleheart and develops burn marks.

are you using a dust collector with your orbital sander? are you applying too much force on the board perhaps? you should really let the sander do it’s job using it’s own weight – without pressing on it hard.

since you are using 80grit, you will have to follow up with 120 on top of that – and work a good amount to remove the 80 grit scratch marks.

since this is end grain – you will have better luck using a scraper than a handplane to smooth it out and clean it up.

good luck!

-- ㊍ When in doubt - There is no doubt - Go the safer route.

View C_PLUS_Woodworker's profile

C_PLUS_Woodworker

450 posts in 1559 days


#4 posted 01-06-2014 06:13 PM

Possible:

Not going through ALL the grits

Not spending enough time at each grit

Make sure…......especially during the first two grits, that you have all the sanding marks gone, then you can move on to the finishing grits

Let the sander do the work

Too much pressure on sander

Holding sander at angle….......it should be flat

Consider using these….........I am a true believer:

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0019FSEZI/ref=ohdetailso00s00i01?ie=UTF8&psc=1

-- We must all walk our own green mile

View BigDaddy2121's profile

BigDaddy2121

10 posts in 331 days


#5 posted 01-07-2014 12:06 AM

Thank you very much for the tips – wish I knew it before as I did everything you mentioned not to do. I put immense pressure on the sander and tilted to try to get more force.

PurpleLev, why would you recommend the scraper vs. the hand planer? Just trying to understand when to use one vs. the other.

C Plus, I ordered the pads and the protector pad already. Looking forward to trying these out!

Thanks again fellas!

View emart's profile

emart

234 posts in 1279 days


#6 posted 01-07-2014 12:10 AM

the hand plant will be more likely to gouge the work when it comes to end grain. any number of things can happen when hand planing especially edge grain. a scraper is much less aggressive than a hand plane and can be easily used for trouble spots without being noticeable

-- tools are only as good as the hands that hold them https://www.custommade.com/by/emeraldcrafts/

View BigDaddy2121's profile

BigDaddy2121

10 posts in 331 days


#7 posted 01-07-2014 12:37 AM

Makes sense – same sort of logic that applies to not putting it through the planer. Thanks

View wseand's profile

wseand

2232 posts in 1693 days


#8 posted 01-07-2014 12:55 AM

I just use my Planer. Your best bet is a drum sander if your going to make a lot of them. The less sanding and scraping you do the better IMO. Not that I’m lazy just bad shoulders.

-- Bill - "Freedom flies in your heart like an Eagle" Audie Murphy

View C_PLUS_Woodworker's profile

C_PLUS_Woodworker

450 posts in 1559 days


#9 posted 01-07-2014 01:06 AM

Agree to the scraper…........for all the reasons stated above…........

I am actually a little embarrassed ( of me to me) that I did not think to mention that….......cuz once I discovered scrapers, my whole world changed.

If you have a hand-held belt sander…...give it to your wife to hide…..... so you won’t be tempted to use that.

(it take A LOT) of screwing up and leaving deep gouges to learn how to properly use a hand-held belt sander….........maybe one day I will learn)

To wseand

Agree on stationary” belt sander, but you are OK running end-grain through a planer?

I have never done that, but only becasue the prevailing opinion on here is that running end-grain, even in light passes, results in lots of exciting things.

I sure do wish I could/would/should use the planer for cross-grain or end-grain….........just hesitated due to all the negative comments about doing that.

Have you done it often enough to feel comfortable about that being a “normal” process for you?

Certainly not arguing…...........want opinion…...........thanks…............Bruce.

-- We must all walk our own green mile

View wseand's profile

wseand

2232 posts in 1693 days


#10 posted 01-07-2014 01:30 AM

Bruce,
I have a DW735 and it works great if you make very shallow passes. Sneak up on the width and take about an 16th or less of a turn on the wheel each pass.. I have made 14 end grain boards and never a problem. I also alternate sides each pass. I’m not saying you won’t have a problem but I have not had a problem. I am certainly no expert. I have tried to make it as flat as possible in the glue up phase which really helps.

-- Bill - "Freedom flies in your heart like an Eagle" Audie Murphy

View BigDaddy2121's profile

BigDaddy2121

10 posts in 331 days


#11 posted 01-07-2014 03:53 AM

You are a better man than me. I have a Makita 2012NB but it scares me every time I start it up. Let alone put an end grain cutting board through it. Just curious, do you router the edges before you send it through?

Like C+ said, do you do anything special to send an end grain board before you send it through? I will say that I thought about it, but I am more afraid of blowing up a great planer than I am getting hurt. I can move pretty quick!

What kind of wood did you use for the board in the pic? Specifically the dark wood.

View C_PLUS_Woodworker's profile

C_PLUS_Woodworker

450 posts in 1559 days


#12 posted 01-07-2014 05:02 AM

To wseand, again:

My cutting boards come out of glue-up real nice and flat.

Pipe clamps with painters tape to catch the glue

Alternate bottom clamp….. then a top clamp, etc.

And use at least 3 oak cauls, on top AND bottom (opposing each other) with packing tape on them to shed glue.

But, you know how much squeeze-out there is, especially on the bottom.

I am ” assuming” your are getting all that surface glue off prior to planing…....or would the glue not screw up the blades like I think it would

I am VERY lucky. I cannot justify a drum sander. But I have a good relationship with a cabinet shop that charges me $10 per board to drum sand top and bottom. That cannot be beat. 180 grit. Perfect EVERY time.

But, they REQUIRE that there be NO surface glue….....and even then the guy isn’t all that happy about belt sanding his own glue-up panels, let alone mine….......glue between the panels that comes off while sanding to get the panel (like cab doors) finish sanded. I guess the belts are real expensive…....and probably time-consuming to swap out. So, I try REAL hard to respect that.

But NO SANDING except for after things like juice grooves or rounding corners and/or edges., etc. VERY VERY lucky to have that resource.

If I hadn’t just paid him 13K for the kitchen in our new house….Hickory….. he probably would have said NO.

-- We must all walk our own green mile

View wseand's profile

wseand

2232 posts in 1693 days


#13 posted 01-07-2014 05:20 AM

I’ll Chamfer the edges. I’ve had them tearout a bit even with the chamfer, but very little. I know there is another guy on here that uses his Planer just can’t remember who it was. You want it to be a thick board, I have never done it to a thin one, I would assume that there would be a better chance of catastrophe with a thin board.

If your feeling fishy about it I wouldn’t try it, it can tear up your planer.

-- Bill - "Freedom flies in your heart like an Eagle" Audie Murphy

View C_PLUS_Woodworker's profile

C_PLUS_Woodworker

450 posts in 1559 days


#14 posted 01-07-2014 05:26 AM

To wseand, again:

My cutting boards come out of glue-up real nice and flat.

Pipe clamps with painters tape to catch the glue

Alternate bottom clamp….. then a top clamp, etc.

And use at least 3 oak cauls, On TOP AND BOTTOM…......opposing each other….......with packing tape on them to shed glue.

But, you know how much squeeze-out there is, especially on the bottom.

I am ” assuming” your are getting all that surface glue off prior to planing…....or would the glue not screw up the blades like I think it would

I am VERY lucky. I cannot justify a drum sander. But I have a good relationship with a cabinet shop that charges me $10 per board to drum sand top and bottom. That cannot be beat. 180 grit. Perfect EVERY time.

But, they REQUIRE that there be NO surface glue….....and even then the guy isn’t all that happy about belt sanding his own glue-up panels, let alone mine….......glue between the panels that comes off while sanding to get the panel (like cab doors) finish sanded. I guess the belts are real expensive…....and probably time-consuming to swap out. So, I try REAL hard to respect that.

But NO SANDING except for after things like juice grooves or rounding corners and/or edges, finger holds on the bottom etc..

Very Very fortunate.

But, I gave the guy 13K for the hickory cabinets in the kitchen and baths of our new house, so he kinda HAS TO do this for me.

Just looked at your projects…..........nice…..........very nice.

I am just getting started on a foyer table that is very close to the one you have posted, except Mission Style Arts and Crafts. It is for a friend and she wants cherry. Never worked with cherry. Not too worried about the build, it is the finish I am worried about. Gonna use Charles Neil’s sealer, then gel then Arm R Seal. Should work OK. (I hope).

Bruce.

-- We must all walk our own green mile

View wseand's profile

wseand

2232 posts in 1693 days


#15 posted 01-07-2014 05:39 AM

I get as much glue off as I can but it hasn’t caused me any problems to have some on, just no big chunks.

I would think the drum sander would tear through the glue if it was cured all the way, but I don’t know enough about them. If he’s letting you use it then I would get it all off too.

-- Bill - "Freedom flies in your heart like an Eagle" Audie Murphy

showing 1 through 15 of 18 replies

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

GardenTenders.com :: gardening showcase