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Veneering Question

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Forum topic by Jim Crockett (USN Retired) posted 12-21-2008 06:12 AM 825 views 0 times favorited 4 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Jim Crockett (USN Retired)

852 posts in 3882 days


12-21-2008 06:12 AM

Have read a lot of articles on veneering and am about to do some “playing” with it. Since, at this point, I’m not going to get into vacuum bags and all that, I have a question about pressing. All of the articles say to sandwich the veneered substrate between layers of mdf and then “add weights” on top but none specify how much weight is to be applied. So that’s my question – 5-10 lbs, 10-20, 25-50, more?? Let’s use an imaginary 6”x8” piece of veneered mdf – would 2 or 3 bricks supply sufficient weight or should I plan on stacking several solid concrete blocks (at about 40 lbs per) atop the sandwiched veneer?

Thanks.

Jim

-- A veteran is someone who, at one point in his/her life, wrote a blank check made payable to "The United States of America," for an amount of "up to and including his/her life".


4 replies so far

View Karson's profile

Karson

35134 posts in 4550 days


#1 posted 12-21-2008 06:24 AM

Your car.

When you use vacuum you get about 2000 lbs per sq ft. So you figure it out. Use a lot of weight and spread it around. Use multiple layers of mdf on top so that the weight gets spread over a larger surface.

-- I've been blessed with a father who liked to tinker in wood, and a wife who lets me tinker in wood. Appomattox Virginia karsonwm@gmail.com †

View John Ormsby's profile

John Ormsby

1288 posts in 3886 days


#2 posted 12-21-2008 06:33 AM

Make sure you put some wax paper below and on top of the piece you are veneering so that it won’t stick to the mdf. Also, you could easily get by using strong deep throat clamps if just doing flat surface veneering of that size. I have done it many times when the vacuum bag was tied up with larger pieces. Also, you should be using a resin or epoxy glue. Some of these glue manufacturers have additives that will reduce or eliminate bleed through on lighter veneers.

-- Oldworld, Fair Oaks, Ca

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Karson

35134 posts in 4550 days


#3 posted 12-21-2008 06:40 AM

I’ve found a great use for butchers paper. It has a plastic coat on the paper to keep meat juices from coming through. It works great for veneering. I tape it on the mdf and then leave it on. But put the tape on the back and not on the veneer side. With enough pressure the masking tape will press an impression into the veneer. It actually compresses the fibers so that where the tape was the veneer is thinner.

-- I've been blessed with a father who liked to tinker in wood, and a wife who lets me tinker in wood. Appomattox Virginia karsonwm@gmail.com †

View Sawdust2's profile

Sawdust2

1466 posts in 4237 days


#4 posted 12-21-2008 04:48 PM

Back when I was using a friends veneer clamp system we always used the rule: Tighten them as tight as you can.

You might want to make a few cauls (2×4 with a slight concave bow formed on the bottom) and them clamp them as tight as you can.

To specifically answer your question – as much pressure as you can get.

Lee

-- No piece is cut too short. It was meant for a smaller project.

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