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Forum topic by Dark_Lightning posted 01-05-2014 02:12 AM 554 views 0 times favorited 18 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Dark_Lightning

1799 posts in 1832 days


01-05-2014 02:12 AM

Topic tags/keywords: carving tool router

Hi folks,

I just bought a Legacy 900 router mill and have some questions. First, though, I’ll point out that it got tipped over and some of the parts got broken or bent. I’ve straightened most of that out.

I’d like to see some pics of the thing so I can figure out where things go, or maybe someone has a .pdf I can get a copy of. I also notice, looking online, that it is missing some parts. I can’t complain, I only paid $300. It was never used, only partially assembled, and there are no instructions. I’ve found some pics online, but not for all that I need.

For parts- I need part of one of the (fiberglass? Delrin?) split nuts, the smooth part, not the threaded part. When the thing got tipped over, the one on the long drive screw was busted off the frame (in the process, also bending that drive screw and the cross-feed screw, and broke the handle off the cross-feed screw wheel). I straightened the drive screws, and can make the other parts if I have to, but I’d rather not. I’ll figure out what other parts are missing when I see some sort of manual. I have an email in to Legacy, but they’re out partying off the New Year, I think.

Also, there is a gear that goes on the lathe head (I’ll call it that for now, since I don’t know what Legacy calls it; it would be the live center on my lathe…though this obviously doesn’t spin like a lathe. It has what appears to be a whole bunch of indexing holes.

Thanks,
Steve


18 replies so far

View mesquite22's profile

mesquite22

42 posts in 1393 days


#1 posted 01-05-2014 04:04 AM

http://ornamentalmills.com/ this group can answer your questions

View Mark Smith's profile

Mark Smith

498 posts in 764 days


#2 posted 01-05-2014 04:12 AM

Legacy has videos on Youtube of the router mill operating.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bpDJNYqCrEU

-- Mark Smith, Tracy, CA., http://www.markscustomwoodcrafts.com

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Dark_Lightning

1799 posts in 1832 days


#3 posted 01-08-2014 03:00 AM

Hi mesquite22, I’ve joined their Google email group and gotten exactly zero since the welcome email; it’s been several days since I posted, and the posts haven’t appeared. Plus, it is a clunky setup. I guess I shouldn’t complain, since the group was formed because the vendor dropped the ball.

Hi Mark, Those videos do not cover the older non- CNC machines, as far as I can tell.

From what I have seen in the Google support group (which, BTW, was formed because Legacy doesn’t support their older (read, obsolete, I guess) products. That is shameful behavior for a company that would make more money by supporting the buyers of older equipment. I’d love to be able to lie to and ignore customers. My fallback position on this purchase is to use the stand for my Record lathe. If I could get someone to respond at the Google group, I’d sell them the remaining parts cheap and use the stand just for my lathe. This is pathetic.

View Loren's profile

Loren

7809 posts in 2371 days


#4 posted 01-08-2014 03:14 AM

You’ll have to call them.

I did, a few times…. finally got them on the phone but they
didn’t have a split nut for my Legacy model, so it’s out of commission
until I get around to figuring out a solution.

They said they’d make a note and call me if they ever
found the part… but they never have.

I’ve researched alternate solutions a bit… the thread size
is unusual so a custom nut will have to be made by
you if they can’t provide one.

HDPE can allegedly be formed to a theaded rod by heating
the rod and clamping the drilled HDPE half block to it to it.

A tap can be made from a length of the Acme rod on
your mill.

A nut can be cut using a metal lathe.

A nut can be made using a 3D printer.

PS – I’ll buy your half nut if you don’t want it.

-- http://lawoodworking.com

View Mark Smith's profile

Mark Smith

498 posts in 764 days


#5 posted 01-08-2014 03:47 AM

The video I linked is about the Ornamental Mill. It has picks of it. I can also look for more as I’ve seen several. I have a Legacy CNC and they are also a little slow on responding to questions on that and if they tell you they’ll get back to you, that means you give them a few days and call them because they don’t get back to you.

I have been to their factory in Utah and I was under the impression they still made the Ornamental Mill, but the factory was all about CNC’s. I didn’t see any sign of an Ornamental Mill. So either I’m wrong and they don’t still make them, or they were made someplace else.

I’ve watched the ornamental mill videos and I really like what it can do. I also like the control you can have on the work product. I have the Arty CNC and it will do turned stock just like the ornamental mill, but the computer programing takes a huge learning curve. They tell you it’s simple, but I’m a computer guy and it was not simple.

-- Mark Smith, Tracy, CA., http://www.markscustomwoodcrafts.com

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Mark Smith

498 posts in 764 days


#6 posted 01-08-2014 03:52 AM

This Facebook page has lots of photos: https://www.facebook.com/legacyornamentalmill?ref=stream

-- Mark Smith, Tracy, CA., http://www.markscustomwoodcrafts.com

View mesquite22's profile

mesquite22

42 posts in 1393 days


#7 posted 01-08-2014 04:00 AM

pm sent

View Dark_Lightning's profile

Dark_Lightning

1799 posts in 1832 days


#8 posted 01-08-2014 12:53 PM

Thanks, guys, I have some actions to take. I can make the non-threaded portion out of brass. I don’t need the threaded half (yet, it has to be a wear part) but I’ll look into threading some stock.

View Dark_Lightning's profile

Dark_Lightning

1799 posts in 1832 days


#9 posted 01-12-2014 03:49 PM

Thanks for the link, Mark, there is stuff I’ll have to dig into, there. From looking at photos, it appears that I am missing more than I thought.

Did all Legacy 900s come with a “cloth” that hangs from the frame, apparently used for dust control?

I’ve done some poking around online and found that I can form my own half-nuts from Delrin. Loren, do you need the threaded side or the smooth side? I’m going to make my own smooth piece on a mill. That is the piece that is broken on mine.

The main lead screw is .602” OD, while the cross-feed lead screw is .625” OD. Kind of strange. I had to shim the circumference of the main lead screw in order to get the slit clamp pressure high enough to keep the lead screw bound to the hand crank shaft.

I’m just guessing on the names of the parts here, I have yet to find any information like a parts list or manuals.

View Loren's profile

Loren

7809 posts in 2371 days


#10 posted 01-12-2014 03:53 PM

I need the whole thing but the threaded half is the only
tricky part to make. You can’t easily glue some of those
plastics together to build up a blank to thickness, so
the best approach is to get stock the full thickness
you’ll need.

If you’re going to the trouble of figuring out how to make
the threaded nuts, do keep me informed.

The dust apron was an option.

I’ll have to check the ODs on the lead screws on my machine. It
never occurred to me they might be different.

-- http://lawoodworking.com

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Dark_Lightning

1799 posts in 1832 days


#11 posted 01-12-2014 05:27 PM

Loren- the reason I asked is that the nuts might not be interchangeable, though I see no indication that this would be the case. I’d hate to make one and have it not work because of that difference.

This is also a strange lead screw, when you get down to it. It is half the pitch (4 tpi- this diameter is usually 8 tpi) of most other ACME threads that I have been able to find. Being oddball like that, I couldn’t find a tap to make the nuts. Also, the taps are $50 up. For the router mill with low loads, and to keep the user from wearing his/her arm out, it makes sense to use a coarser pitch.

View Loren's profile

Loren

7809 posts in 2371 days


#12 posted 01-12-2014 05:31 PM

It is done that way so each 1/4 turn is 1/16” of travel. It does
save the cranking.

There’s instructions to make a cider press screw tap in a
Roy Underhill book using a steel rod and a file.

-- http://lawoodworking.com

View Mark Smith's profile

Mark Smith

498 posts in 764 days


#13 posted 01-12-2014 09:00 PM

If you meant those questions for me, I don’t know the answer. I’ve never even seen a Legacy Router Mill in real life. I do know that Legacy does make a lot of their own parts for their CNC’s, so maybe at the very least you could get them to send you CAD files for the missing parts and you could have somebody with a machine shop make the parts for you? I’d bet that would get expensive though.

-- Mark Smith, Tracy, CA., http://www.markscustomwoodcrafts.com

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Dark_Lightning

1799 posts in 1832 days


#14 posted 01-12-2014 11:00 PM

I was just kind of throwing it out there, Mark, and included you because of the pictures link.

As far as that cranking goes, I’ll approach the CNC capability slowly, if at all. I would at least motorize the main lead screw, since I have better things to do with my time than running that crank handle for hours on end to make a fluted spiral, for example.

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Dark_Lightning

1799 posts in 1832 days


#15 posted 01-16-2014 08:59 PM

I’m working on a bracket design for the lead screw nut. The parts I have, there is now way that they fit my machine. Here is a .jpg that anyone can download, size to fit, print out and try it on their machine.

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