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Forum topic by pallystu posted 01-04-2014 11:42 PM 901 views 0 times favorited 10 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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pallystu

75 posts in 1070 days


01-04-2014 11:42 PM

Topic tags/keywords: cedar oak red oak shellac box keepsake box question finishing

Im planing on making a small box out of red oak with a cedar lid on it. I was thinking the dark brown and red tones of the cedar may go well with the lighter brown color of the oak. Im planing on finishing it with shellac. Do you guys think that the colors will go together well and do you think that a shellac would be a good finish for cedar? I never worked with cedar before and I don’t know how to finish it. the finished project will be a small keep sake box so it does not need to have a thick protective film over it and well honesty I don’t want a thick plastic looking finish on it like a poly would provide :) am I on the right track with this?

-- take your time


10 replies so far

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CharlesA

3020 posts in 1259 days


#1 posted 01-04-2014 11:46 PM

I’m assuming you’re talking about eastern red cedar. If not—never mind.

Having just constructed a cedar chest out of this, the trick you’re going to have is a surface free of knots and other irregularities. Cedar is a gnarly wood. You’ll have to choose the piece your using carefully. I think an Arm-R-Seal poly looks really good on cedar and doesn’t look plastic looking, but I understand you’re wanting to avoid poly.

-- "Man is the only animal which devours his own, for I can apply no milder term to the general prey of the rich on the poor." ~Thomas Jefferson

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Jimbo4

1432 posts in 2225 days


#2 posted 01-04-2014 11:56 PM

You must keep a wet edge of whatever finish/sealer you are using on cedar, or it will be blotchy. Cedar tends to be really dry, so it will soak up the finish/sealer rather quickly. Even if the cedar is damp, it will blotch, especially aromatic red cedar. Reference my avatar, that was a real pain to seal ! And all I used was Deft Sealer.

-- BOVILEXIA: The urge to moo at cows from a moving vehicle.

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pallystu

75 posts in 1070 days


#3 posted 01-04-2014 11:57 PM

I’m not all to sure what kind of cedar it is but I’m pretty sure its eastern red cedar…my good wood sources are out of lumber this time of year and I can only get my wood from the box store near me(yuck). Ill look into Arm-R-Seal more since Iv seen it around before but I have never used it. Do you have any recommendations on using it? I’m open to the use of poly if I can find a way to apply it with out it getting to the plastic level of thickness.

-- take your time

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Jimbo4

1432 posts in 2225 days


#4 posted 01-05-2014 12:18 AM

I’ve not used Arm-R-Seal, so do not know what it would be like. Poly depends on how many coats are used to get the plastic look. I use the semi-gloss, which doesn’t show up as plastic.

-- BOVILEXIA: The urge to moo at cows from a moving vehicle.

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CharlesA

3020 posts in 1259 days


#5 posted 01-05-2014 12:21 AM

I use the satin Arm-r-seal and really like it. You put on pretty thin coats as a wiping varnish, so you can control the build-up. I have no experience with shellac in this type of situation, so I don’t have an opinion on how it would work.

-- "Man is the only animal which devours his own, for I can apply no milder term to the general prey of the rich on the poor." ~Thomas Jefferson

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pallystu

75 posts in 1070 days


#6 posted 01-05-2014 12:23 AM

I may use a single coat of poly for this project maybe two if the finish looks uneven. It truly does not need much protection though so if films are the way to go due to it being a thirsty wood would a shellac be a good alternative to poly? Im kicking around the idea of hitting it with Tung oil to help fill the wood up a little bit and make the grain stand out more first and then coat it with shellac. The ideia of using arm-r-seal as a wiping varnish sounds good as well.

-- take your time

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CharlesA

3020 posts in 1259 days


#7 posted 01-05-2014 12:30 AM

The Arm-r-seal brings the color out in cedar pretty well, but I can’t compare to your other options.

-- "Man is the only animal which devours his own, for I can apply no milder term to the general prey of the rich on the poor." ~Thomas Jefferson

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pallystu

75 posts in 1070 days


#8 posted 01-05-2014 12:35 AM

all right Thanks guys…With all the options given here I think a wiping varnish maybe the best way to go with this. hey look it might be less work and faster with the wiping varnish as well lol. once more thanks guys.

-- take your time

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Jimbo4

1432 posts in 2225 days


#9 posted 01-05-2014 03:05 AM

Shellac will blotch the cedar as well, if you don’t keep a wet edge.

-- BOVILEXIA: The urge to moo at cows from a moving vehicle.

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pallystu

75 posts in 1070 days


#10 posted 01-05-2014 08:04 PM

Thanks for the tips! Its better to find out it blotches now rather then later lol.

-- take your time

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