LumberJocks

Cleaning Table Saw with Glue

  • Advertise with us

« back to Focus on the Workspace forum

Forum topic by Siegel_KenEvil posted 01-03-2014 09:37 PM 1365 views 1 time favorited 10 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View Siegel_KenEvil's profile

Siegel_KenEvil

114 posts in 2299 days


01-03-2014 09:37 PM

This might be a good trick or the dumbest thing in the world. I don’t take the best care of my table saw. The other day, I was scraping off some glue that dripped on it and I noticed the surface under the glue was cleaner that the rest of the saw top. I got the idea to cover the entire top with a thin layer of old glue and it worked great for removing the surface rust. It wasn’t hard to scrap off either.

Has anyone done this before?

-- Scott


10 replies so far

View kaerlighedsbamsen's profile

kaerlighedsbamsen

1177 posts in 1175 days


#1 posted 01-03-2014 10:01 PM

Now THAT is creative thinking!

-- "Do or Do not. There is no try." - Yoda

View knotscott's profile

knotscott

7209 posts in 2837 days


#2 posted 01-03-2014 10:23 PM

Sort of like a deep cleansing “facial mask” for your table saw!

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

View iminmyshop's profile

iminmyshop

258 posts in 1455 days


#3 posted 01-03-2014 11:34 PM

what kind of glue were you using?
Did you put anything on afterward to protect the surface from rerusting>

View KelvinGrove's profile

KelvinGrove

1399 posts in 1374 days


#4 posted 01-04-2014 01:37 AM

Since not having a clue has never stopped me from commenting before…I’ll jump in on this one as well.

It would seem that what ever is stuck to the table would have to be something which had come into contact with the table in some way. That would leave us with two possibilities. One would be corrosion and the other would be various lignin (sap) based compounds. It then seems logical that if the glue sticks to the lignin with a greater bond factor than corrosion has for the table, then when scraped off the glue would bring the lignin with it. And since , by nature, the corrosion is “falling off” of the metal the “rust”, or most of it, would come off as well.

Now I need a little brush and to run a test to see if this is true.

What is that old thing about the greatest discoveries being made by accident.

-- Tim P. Calhoun GA. If traffic is passing you on the right, YOU ARE IN THE WRONG DAMN LANE.

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

115202 posts in 3038 days


#5 posted 01-04-2014 01:55 AM

Very interesting,but weird .

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View Nicholas Hall's profile

Nicholas Hall

350 posts in 1568 days


#6 posted 01-04-2014 02:18 AM

I knew you meant this ironically Kelvin but just the same, I think I may have a new signature line

“Since not having a clue has never stopped me from commenting before…I’ll jump in on this one as well.”

At any rate, I’d say that now that it’s clean, you should swab some SlipIt on there. It’s cheap, and you won’t believe how well it works. You’ll wonder how you ever got on without it. I know I did. The friction between the tabletop and the wood you’re cutting will drop 50% or more. The less force you need to exert pushing your hand towards a carbide blade, the happier you will be.

Also, this is the weirdest, coolest table cleaning methodology I’ve heard in a while. I’d try it myself, but I finally got my tabletop shipshape and friction free…

-- Outside of a dog, a book is a man's best friend. Inside of a dog, it's too dark to read. -Groucho Marx

View Siegel_KenEvil's profile

Siegel_KenEvil

114 posts in 2299 days


#7 posted 01-04-2014 01:26 PM


Above is a picture of my table saw after the glue mask followed by a coat of Johnson’s wax. Below is a picture of my band saw 12 hours after the glue was applied. Most the glue flaked off with no help on my part. The same thing happened on the table saw in large places but not the entire top.

I had the ole propane heater running when I put the glue on. Right now, it’s about 5 degrees (F) in there so that might explain the flaking.

-- Scott

View dankc908's profile

dankc908

28 posts in 1827 days


#8 posted 01-04-2014 03:59 PM

Once again – what type of glue? This sounds interesting!

-- Dan Christensen "We can easily forgive a child who is afraid of the dark; the real tragedy of life is when men are afraid of the light." --PLATO

View KelvinGrove's profile

KelvinGrove

1399 posts in 1374 days


#9 posted 01-04-2014 05:50 PM

Thanks Nicholas, The line is a take off on a guy I used to work with in the fire house (as you might imagine, fire fighters are as independent as hogs on ice) who would routinely join a conversation by saying “I don’t know…but let me tell you”...

It always got a laugh.

And feel free to quote me on that line…preferably credited to “Mr. Wizard”

-- Tim P. Calhoun GA. If traffic is passing you on the right, YOU ARE IN THE WRONG DAMN LANE.

View Siegel_KenEvil's profile

Siegel_KenEvil

114 posts in 2299 days


#10 posted 01-05-2014 11:50 AM

It’s wood glue. I think it’s called PVA or PV. There’s a picture of the empty bottle I used which happened to be Elmer’s Wood Glue.

-- Scott

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com