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Hand drill Ferrule repair

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Forum topic by 12strings posted 01-03-2014 02:57 AM 2374 views 0 times favorited 17 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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12strings

434 posts in 1846 days


01-03-2014 02:57 AM

Hi all,

I and trying to rehab this hand drill for my dad. It has a wooden handle attached with a metal ferrule and what looks like a pin (or two, It either goes all the way through, or there is one on each side, I can’t tell).

Does anyone know how it might be attached and the best way to tighten it. it is loos and the handle wobbles. So I’m wondering if it can be removed, or tightened without removal. I guess I just don’t understand how it is put together.

Thanks! Here’s the pic:

-- I'm strictly hand-tool only...unless the power tool is faster and easier!


17 replies so far

View TobyC's profile

TobyC

580 posts in 1337 days


#1 posted 01-03-2014 03:35 AM

Pin should tap out, shaft is threaded but the wood threads in the handle are probably stripped.

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Chuck Walker

9 posts in 1315 days


#2 posted 01-03-2014 04:22 AM

The shaft is not likely threaded but may have some serrations or ridges around the shaft where the pin goes through. The shaft is only a couple inches long. You will probably need to remove the pin and pull the handle off straight and then see what can be done to tighten the hole for the shaft.

Chuck

-- Chuck - Nothing tried, nothing botched, nothing learned!

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12strings

434 posts in 1846 days


#3 posted 01-03-2014 04:58 AM

That’s what I like to see…solid consensus!

-- I'm strictly hand-tool only...unless the power tool is faster and easier!

View TobyC's profile

TobyC

580 posts in 1337 days


#4 posted 01-03-2014 04:09 PM

Either way, drive out the pin and take the handle off, and take out the slop.

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TobyC

580 posts in 1337 days


#5 posted 01-03-2014 04:14 PM

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MisterInquisitive

32 posts in 1558 days


#6 posted 01-03-2014 10:10 PM

All the eggbeaters I’ve seen have threaded stud to go into the handle. I drove out the pin, drilled out the recess in the handle, glued a new piece of dowel in there, and re-drilled the hole a little undersized so that the threads would act like a self-taping screw. Then re-drilled for the pin and either used the old one or peined over a nail for the new pin, can’t remember. Still tight today.

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12strings

434 posts in 1846 days


#7 posted 01-05-2014 06:01 PM

Update: I drove out the pin, and the handle did indeed screw off…not sure what kind of drill it is yet, perhaps I will find some markings once I clean it up.

-- I'm strictly hand-tool only...unless the power tool is faster and easier!

View TobyC's profile

TobyC

580 posts in 1337 days


#8 posted 01-05-2014 08:05 PM

Like this?

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TobyC

580 posts in 1337 days


#9 posted 01-05-2014 08:08 PM

Look on the flat part of the handle, might be a Millers Falls No. 1.

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TobyC

580 posts in 1337 days


#10 posted 01-05-2014 08:16 PM

No. 1

No.1 hand drill Single-speed hand drill

ca. 1900 — malleable iron frame; cocobolo head and crank handle; detachable, egg-shaped side handle; screw-type adjustable equalizer bearing; McCoy’s springless chuck adjustable from 0 to 3/16 inch; shipped with eight fluted drill points. Drive gear and frame are black enameled; bright parts are nickel plated.
by 1904 — teardrop-shaped side handle
1910 — as above, but detachable, mushroom-shaped side handle; star-type trademark on crank.
1912 — as above, but ball thrust bearing on spindle.
1914 — as above, but tropical hardwood head and handles
1915 — as above, but drive gear is painted red.
1917 — as above, but cocobolo head and handles.
1921 — as above, but triangular trademark; head is cocobolo, side and crank handles are not.
1925 — as above, but Ryther’s chuck adjustable from 0 to 1/4 inch.
1931 — as above, but trademarks display Greenfield, rather than Millers Falls location.
1935 — as above, but tropical hardwood head; no mention of screw-type adjustable equalizer bearing; detachable chef’s cap side handle.

Millers Falls

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12strings

434 posts in 1846 days


#11 posted 01-06-2014 03:38 AM

Next question, the chuck (3 jaws) advances when tightened, but doesn’t retract when loosed….i have to push them down manually…any thoughts?

-- I'm strictly hand-tool only...unless the power tool is faster and easier!

View Wally331's profile

Wally331

341 posts in 1486 days


#12 posted 01-06-2014 04:38 AM

put a few drops of oil into the jaws, then run the mechanism back and forth quite a few times, there is most likely just a ton of dried debris in there. Some chucks you can screw totally off and use a dowel , pressing it into the hole where the chuck screws on, this pushes the jaws forward and back and will let you better work the oil into the mechanism.

Worst case scenario and you have broken springs which can be very difficult to find and/or make.

View TobyC's profile

TobyC

580 posts in 1337 days


#13 posted 01-06-2014 01:19 PM

It’s a springless chuck, clean and oil, they’re not going to spring open on their own but they should be free to flop loose.

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TobyC

580 posts in 1337 days


#14 posted 01-06-2014 01:20 PM

So, is it a No. 1?

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12strings

434 posts in 1846 days


#15 posted 01-06-2014 01:46 PM

I read elsewhere that some early drills did not have spring loaded jaws, and that may be the case here…It certainly looks like a no. 1, but I see no markings. It has the hollow handle for bit storage, and the slightly tapered frame like the 1, and while I thought it was all black, cleaning did expose a red wheel…

My dad may not use this much if the jaws prove too much trouble, and I already have a MF 2500 for my own use.

-- I'm strictly hand-tool only...unless the power tool is faster and easier!

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