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Delta tenon jig 34-182 and 34-183 what are the differences? (two part question)

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Forum topic by ScottKaye posted 192 days ago 890 views 0 times favorited 5 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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ScottKaye

251 posts in 536 days


192 days ago

When my father passed away my brother and I divided up some of my fathers tools and one of the things I ended up with is an older model delta tenon jig. It sat on my shelf for the better part of a year and half and now I am in need of its use to make some open moritse and tenons on my current project (shoe racks) for purely asthetic reasons. There aren any markings on the jig that identify its model number. As near as I can figure it is either a Delta 34-182 or a 34-183. From the pictures ive seen on the web they look identical. I was able to find a manual online for the 34-183 but nothing for the 34-182. Im taking a shot in the dark here, but does anyone know the differences between the two jigs?

The second question I have is how do I get the slop out of the miter bar? I think slop is a bad word here, as it isnt Lucy loose… but there is barely some noticeable side to side movement when applying side pressure on the jig. Its really more of a feel than visual but if I had to take wild guess Id say no more than 1/128” side movement. Im not a fan of taking a punch to the sides of the bar to try and dimple it as I have never been successful at that let alone trying to do the same on a framing square to try and pull in one leg or another. I was thinking I could rip up some 3/4” stock and use that as the miter runner. Maybe even spray some dry lube on it to help it last longer.

As I was writing this, I had an idea to adhere a piece of packing tape to one side of the bar. First I tried some painters tape.. Bad idea, that baby wadded up faster than one of my high school english test results. The packing tape measured in at .003 on the dial indicator. I didnt have much faith that it would work and frankly figured it too would wad up. Low and behold it stuck and it worked. The tape took out almost all the side play. I may go with it as it is now. I’m still open to sugestions. Maybe an Incra bar is in my future.

Scott

-- "Nothing happens until you build it"


5 replies so far

View Lee Barker's profile

Lee Barker

2163 posts in 1434 days


#1 posted 191 days ago

Seems a bit fussy to me, Scott.

How about this: With some decent stock, make four or five tenons, leaning into and away from the saw blade on random cuts. When they’re all done, measure them. I’m thinking you’re going to find that a few strokes of a plane or rasp here and there and they will all be close to the same; certainly usable.

There is an allowable amount of inaccuracy in woodworking. Getting overly meticulous, while defensible on the side of perfection, can take all the joy and adventure and, indeed, skill (as in dressing a tenon) out of our craft.

Kindly,

Lee

-- "...in his brain, which is as dry as the remainder biscuit after a voyage, he hath strange places cramm'd with observation, the which he vents in mangled forms." --Shakespeare, "As You Like It"

View TaybulSawz's profile

TaybulSawz

133 posts in 266 days


#2 posted 191 days ago

I drill and tap my miter bars and then install allen head threaded screws. This allows me to fine tune the bars to exactly fit the miter slot and have no slop. I do this on All my bars, wood and metal

-- Still got all my Fingers!!!

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ScottKaye

251 posts in 536 days


#3 posted 191 days ago

Taybulsawz.. Great idea.. I do the same for my zero clearance inserts. I can see no reason why it wouldnt work on the miter bars as well.

Lee. yeah.. my wife says Im a bit anal. Im sure I get that from my dad. I have found though, when I dont take my time and just rush right through a project, I miss the little things. a mis-measurement here, cutting on the wrong face there. etc etc. So yeah, it may take me longer than the average woodworker to get the same task done, but at least Its usually done correctly. Your suggestion about doing some test cust and measuring the distance is also a good one. thanks forthe tip.

Scott

-- "Nothing happens until you build it"

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ScottKaye

251 posts in 536 days


#4 posted 190 days ago

Ok. after tuning up my jig, I am fairly certain it is a 34-182. The instructions I was using were for the 34-183. Both jigs are fairly identical to each other with the main difference being the 34-183 has an adjustable miter bar which includes t-slot washers at both ends (you can take them off if you don’t have t-slots in your table top. Also the 34-183 has holes drilled and tapped in the vertical backstop to allow the attachment of a sacrificial fence to help avoid tear out as the saw blade exits your work piece. If you have a 34-182, you can still pick up an adjustable miter bar (here) though its a tad on the pricey side. I think I’m just going to drill and tap my current bar and use the set screw idea as mentioned above.

hope this helps someone in the future!

Scott

-- "Nothing happens until you build it"

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ScottKaye

251 posts in 536 days


#5 posted 189 days ago

tabylsawz… That drill and tap trick worked like a charm. used 6-32 X 1/4” set screws. Next time I’ll upsize to the 8-32. Broke a tap in the process and almost broke a 1/16 allen wrench.

-- "Nothing happens until you build it"

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