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Butcher Block Cart Question

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Forum topic by Bill Swartzwelder posted 12-29-2013 01:26 AM 629 views 0 times favorited 7 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Bill Swartzwelder

175 posts in 1380 days


12-29-2013 01:26 AM

My wife would like me to build her a roll around butcher block cart/cabinet, with some storage space underneath.

I plan to use Cherry and Walnut for the top, which will be a 3” thick, 24” square end grain cutting board. I was concerned about mounting the top to the rolling cabinet, because I am unsure how much an end grain cutting board expands and contracts. I probably should also mount it so it is removable for periodic cleaning/refinishing. I am just a hobbiest when it comes to woodworking. Anyone have some experience with this type of application? I have made things before that didn’t work, trying to avoid that this time. :) Also open to links to similar kitchen work carts if anyone has done a project like this.

Thanks so much!

Bill

-- What if the Hokey Pokey really is what its all about?


7 replies so far

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ShaneA

6476 posts in 2066 days


#1 posted 12-29-2013 01:57 AM

A desk top fastner or figure 8 could handle the expansion, the end grain top should not be too prone to movement though.

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bannerpond1

397 posts in 1367 days


#2 posted 12-29-2013 08:51 PM

I’m in the design phase of a butcher block table for a client’s kitchen. I have come up with a way to make the movement moot. I’m going to make a frame which attaches to the four legs and is rabbeted all around so that I can drop the butcher block into the frame. I plan to make the space minimal all around to allow it to expand. This also allows me to ship the butcher block in a separate container so it can be well padded and reduce the weigh of the table itself.

You bring up an interesting point in determining the amount of movement across an end grain board. I think I will do some testing and see just how much that might be.

Be sure to post a photo when you finish and i’ll do the same.

-- --Dale Page

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Bill Swartzwelder

175 posts in 1380 days


#3 posted 12-30-2013 01:57 AM

Thanks for the replies. I found an old Norm Abram butcher block table build video, in which he also made an outer frame as you mention. He cut a taper on the perimeter of the Butcher Block and a taper on the frame, then dropped it down into the frame. It can climb up the taper as it expands. Your rabbit idea is more appealing to me.

-- What if the Hokey Pokey really is what its all about?

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AandCstyle

2575 posts in 1725 days


#4 posted 12-30-2013 02:08 AM

Use The Shrinkulator to determine the potential movement. While the board will be endgrain on the cutting surface, it will flat grain where it meets the frame and that is where you need to allow for the expansion/contraction. I think I would go with Norm’s rather elegant solution.

-- Art

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Bill Swartzwelder

175 posts in 1380 days


#5 posted 12-30-2013 02:30 AM

So you are saying it only expands the length of the grain? So an end grain board would only get taller when wet?

-- What if the Hokey Pokey really is what its all about?

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AandCstyle

2575 posts in 1725 days


#6 posted 12-30-2013 02:53 AM

The length will only change by an insignificant amount. You indicated that this will be an end grain CB which indicates to me that the end grain will face the top and bottom of the board so the flat grain will be on the sides where the CB will meet whatever frame you decide to make and that is where the significant movement will occur and needs to be allowed for. Does this clarify the issue?

-- Art

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Bill Swartzwelder

175 posts in 1380 days


#7 posted 12-30-2013 02:54 AM

Got it… Thanks for the clarification.

-- What if the Hokey Pokey really is what its all about?

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