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Working out dimensions for dining table

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Forum topic by LiveEdge posted 12-28-2013 05:15 AM 1550 views 1 time favorited 6 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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LiveEdge

486 posts in 1082 days


12-28-2013 05:15 AM

Topic tags/keywords: table alder mission furniture

I’ve been working my skills up to building a dining table and have decided to take my inspiration from this mission design:

I’ve drawn the plans in SketchUp, but I have some questions which probably have standard answers.

The table top, I’ve decided will be 66×42. The website states two facts about dimensions:
24” wide base with levelers
42” between trestles on 66” and 72” tables

So here are the questions:
1) By my calculations, with three inch legs, that leaves 9” on the ends between the leg and the table edge. Is that comfortable enough for someone to sit there or should I shrink the distance between the trestles to 36” to give a 12” space at the end?
2) How about in the other dimension? How much space should I have between the outside of the leg and the edge of the table widthwise?
3) I am going to build out of alder and could use either 6/4 or 5/4 stock for the top. Opinions?
4) Do you think the stylistic diamonds on the trestles are to hide hardware that could actually be removed to disassemble the table for moving? I’ve thought about just continuing the mission style and making actual through tenons with pegs which would then allow for easy disassembly.
5) Speaking of that, would the table top be attached to the trestles in a way that allows for taking apart? I assume it’s the geared sliders that attach because the top has to be able to slide to allow for the leaves. Because of the lack of pictures, I’m sorta left to my imagination here.

I’d love to hear from people with knowledge of these things!


6 replies so far

View Ltwud's profile

Ltwud

24 posts in 1405 days


#1 posted 12-28-2013 06:52 AM

I have an opinion on a few of your questions #1 As a homebuilder I have done many islands with bar seating and in my opinion 11” min overhang and 13-14” ideal. I think you would be very frustrated with 9”. #2 The numbers will be the same on both the side and end. I would seriously use cardboard or whatever materials available to confirm your comfort before you make a cut. #3 Alder thickness. I’m not an expert in crafstman design but have worked a lot with alder and its is much lighter than other hardwoods. I would want the top finished out at a minimum of 1” thick and think I would prefer 1.5” but you would have to play with it in sketchup so it would depend on the quality of your wood source.
I don’t have an opinion on your other questions but an issue you didn’t raise that may come up is chair height. A couple inches off can be very uncomfortable. Obviously you could adjust if you build your own chairs but I would consider adjusting the table height to fit your chairs and uniqnesses of your family. Again I would model it before cutting

Good Luck!

Larry

View Monte Pittman's profile

Monte Pittman

21997 posts in 1800 days


#2 posted 12-28-2013 11:18 AM

12” on the overhang. Maybe you can lengthen table by 6”.

For tables I like at least 6/4. I have used up to 12/4.

The chairs and table MUST be comfortable together. Chair height has to give the user leg room and comfort to sit at the table.

-- Mother Nature created it, I just assemble it.

View b2rtch's profile

b2rtch

4822 posts in 2510 days


#3 posted 12-28-2013 01:06 PM

Talking about chairs and table heights what should they be?
I am just finishing a table for our patio that I made at the same eight that my existing dinning table but it is too high from my patio chairs (where it will be used).
What are the standard height s for table and for chairs?

-- Bert

View Lee Barker's profile

Lee Barker

2170 posts in 2312 days


#4 posted 12-28-2013 04:13 PM

Highland Woodworking has a nice simple chart.

The subject is more complex than a list. There is a book that—no exaggeration—is about 2.5” thick and it has not only the fixed dimensions (of everything!) but also access/egress numbers. Very helpful when you’re, say, building a table for a specific room, or something that goes in a corner.

Some comments: Mission is usually white oak, sometimes mahogany. Dark tones. The alder, natural, is going to look wan. Stained, it leans toward blotchy. This will be a lifetimeS piece, so my counsel is to make the stretch and get the appropriate wood. 6/4, net 1.25, will work for the top.

The equalizer hardware is the Right Stuff, and yes, it will be a simple screwgun exercise to remove the top from the base.

I would build the substructure with glue. A wobbly table is no credit to the builder.

The mission designs, in my experience, are kin to the craftsman era: truth in craftsmanship. I don’t think the diamonds would authentically have a second purpose.

Kindly,

Lee

-- "...in his brain, which is as dry as the remainder biscuit after a voyage, he hath strange places cramm'd with observation, the which he vents in mangled forms." --Shakespeare, "As You Like It"

View LiveEdge's profile

LiveEdge

486 posts in 1082 days


#5 posted 12-28-2013 04:49 PM

Thanks for the replies. I’ll definitely check out that link. As far as the wood selection, I’m picking alder not for its cost but for the very qualities you mentioned. Neither my wife nor I care for the strong grain of oak and we both like the splotchy quality of alder. It lends a rustic look, which I think goes well with Mission style. (I built a smaller alder end table which I have in projects to confirm that I would like the look). My only real concern is the softness of the wood. I’m prepared for some dinging over the years.

I will definitely look at extending the table six inches.

Another question. What are the pros/cons of making the top out of fewer pieces that run the length versus more pieces that run the width?

View Lee Barker's profile

Lee Barker

2170 posts in 2312 days


#6 posted 12-28-2013 06:29 PM

quote: What are the pros/cons of making the top out of fewer pieces that run the length versus more pieces that run the width?

Theoretically both could be equally flat. I’m not so sure that would be true practically.

To me the difference is principally visual: The long way looks strong, the short way looks like the ends will fall off.

I hear your comments about the look and the rusticness of alder. I understand that the mission part is only about architecture, not about the whole aesthetic of the style.

I hope you post progress on a blog on your page. I would follow it!

Kindly,

Lee

-- "...in his brain, which is as dry as the remainder biscuit after a voyage, he hath strange places cramm'd with observation, the which he vents in mangled forms." --Shakespeare, "As You Like It"

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