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Wood Movement in Very Large Decorative Boxes

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Forum topic by BlairHarp posted 12-23-2013 04:07 PM 1222 views 0 times favorited 5 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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BlairHarp

5 posts in 1086 days


12-23-2013 04:07 PM

Topic tags/keywords: box question bubinga maple

First – I have been a lurker of LumberJocks for many months. What a great community, I am ready to dive in and become a more active supporter.

I have been asked to design and build a decorative box that is rather large. Final dimensions will be around 16”Deepx24”Widex10”Tall. I am trying to determine the best method for creating the lid for this box. The lid will need to be hinged, and I would like to have a top with the look of either a solid attached top (which seems pretty risky with such a large footprint) or a frame and panel style. I intend to build the box solid and cut the top away. Creating the top as a floating panel seems to be the safe route, but I am open to other opinions.

The box sides will be Bubinga, and they would like to have a figured maple as the top and any accents (like miter splines, removable trays, etc).

So what do you think? On a rather large box what methods have worked best for you? Any creative solutions I am overlooking?

Thanks in advance

Blair


5 replies so far

View Lee Barker's profile

Lee Barker

2170 posts in 2318 days


#1 posted 12-23-2013 05:14 PM

Five piece top. You’ll not have to wonder.

Go for it!

Kindly,

Lee

-- "...in his brain, which is as dry as the remainder biscuit after a voyage, he hath strange places cramm'd with observation, the which he vents in mangled forms." --Shakespeare, "As You Like It"

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Hammerthumb

2533 posts in 1443 days


#2 posted 12-23-2013 08:40 PM

You could use a plywood center and miter solid boards around the perimeter. When I do that, it is hard to get the center and miters perfect, but you can install a decorative inlay where they meet. That is how I did this:

-- Paul, Las Vegas

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

115206 posts in 3044 days


#3 posted 12-23-2013 09:18 PM

Lee and Paul have my first two suggestions. If you use either approach you can veneer the ply to get the kind of wood you want or go with solid wood and a panel. You can also just have a solid piece of wood with battens that have elongated holes that allow for wood movement, I’ve seen a good number of miniature chest that have been done that way. lastly you could do a solid wood top with bread board ends,done properly these allow for wood movement and to help keep the top flat.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

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Lee Barker

2170 posts in 2318 days


#4 posted 12-24-2013 12:32 AM

Breadboard ends: great suggestion, Jim. Done to the right scale, that could be really cool.

Kindly,

Lee

-- "...in his brain, which is as dry as the remainder biscuit after a voyage, he hath strange places cramm'd with observation, the which he vents in mangled forms." --Shakespeare, "As You Like It"

View BlairHarp's profile

BlairHarp

5 posts in 1086 days


#5 posted 02-03-2014 05:50 PM

Thanks for the replies, sorry it took me so long to get back to this. Here is what the top ended up looking like before final finish. I think it turned out pretty good, overall there is a room for the panel to move but the fit is snug enough that it doesn’t make noise or rattle. Another change to this project is that the wood used was changed to a more simple all Walnut design.

Again – Thanks for the help, it was the push I needed to move in the direction I felt was going to be right.

Blair

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