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Unhappy with my Pilot Bit / Countersink from Rockler - Any suggestions?

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Forum topic by toddbeaulieu posted 12-23-2013 12:00 PM 1596 views 0 times favorited 26 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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toddbeaulieu

413 posts in 1756 days


12-23-2013 12:00 PM

Every time I use a bit from that set that I assumed would be the most amazing tools for drilling pilot holes and countersinking … I regret my purchase.

These aren’t cheap, at over $20 each – over $60 for the set of 3.

They IMMEDIATELY clog. I have to stop and work the packed wood from the two cavities under the ring with a pick. This is no way to work. To make matters MUCH worse, I broke the smaller pilot bit a while back and Rockler’s replacement bits don’t have a flat side like those in the set. The small set screw does NOT prevent the bit from spilling. In fact, Either the set screw is stripped now or the bit holder itself. Even more irritated now.

Does anyone have a recommendation or similar experience? Do I need to purchase dedicated countersink bits and drill/countersink in separate operations?


26 replies so far

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

2045 posts in 1245 days


#1 posted 12-23-2013 12:17 PM

I consider the Fuller bits among the best, but I’m not sure you won’t still have some of the clogging problem. Seems to me it’s kinda the nature of the beast. I prefer to drill the pilot holes and then use a separate countersink. Some countersinks don’t stay centered around the pilot hole, but these work great.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

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toddbeaulieu

413 posts in 1756 days


#2 posted 12-23-2013 12:22 PM

I’ve never seen that design before. Interesting.

I find it funny how all the photos of the combination setups show them with the collar uselessly high up. It makes them look wonderfully self-cleaning, but in the real world I don’t want half the screw buried half way through the material so the collar needs to be quite close to the business end.

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kdc68

2076 posts in 1029 days


#3 posted 12-23-2013 12:45 PM

+1 for Fred’s suggestion of Fuller countersinks. I’ve owned a set of these for several years now. They have remained sharp and can be used with standard drill bits. I use the #8 frequently, and replaced the drill bits with standard bits many times because they dull but the countersink is still sharp.

-- Measure "at least" twice and cut once

View bondogaposis's profile

bondogaposis

2755 posts in 1103 days


#4 posted 12-23-2013 01:18 PM

I’ve been using my Fuller countersinks bits for 40 years, still going strong. The depth stops are not needed as you can eye ball the correct depth easily depending on whether you are countersinking a screw head or using a plug.

-- Bondo Gaposis

View Monte Pittman's profile

Monte Pittman

15503 posts in 1090 days


#5 posted 12-23-2013 01:27 PM

This looks like it was designed to clog. I don’t like the look of the ring on there at all.

-- Mother Nature created it, I just assemble it.

View David Dean's profile

David Dean

540 posts in 1651 days


#6 posted 12-23-2013 01:35 PM

Have you tryed this counter sink bit I now it’s a poor mans counter sink but it has worked well for me I use it on cabinet graed plywood and the tear out anit bad.

View Tennessee's profile

Tennessee

1575 posts in 1266 days


#7 posted 12-23-2013 01:36 PM

I’ve never seen them with the ring up there. Made to clog. All the ones I buy do clog in the cutters, but I also buy cheap ones. None of mine have rings. When you push down to the ring, does the ring put a circle in your wood while spinning? I wonder why the ring is there at all…

-- Paul, Tennessee, http://www.tsunamiguitars.com

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kdc68

2076 posts in 1029 days


#8 posted 12-23-2013 01:45 PM

+1 bondogaposis….I don’t use depth stops either. You’ll get the feel for it and know when to stop for a perfect depth after some practice.

-- Measure "at least" twice and cut once

View Nubsnstubs's profile

Nubsnstubs

258 posts in 482 days


#9 posted 12-23-2013 01:49 PM

When I was activly operating my cabinet shop, I bought 5 of those counter sinks pictured. They had 4 cutting edges instead of the one edge pictured. I don’t remember any clogging at all. I do remember the bits dulling or breaking off pretty regular.
I don’t have any pictures of what I use now, but if you put in “Countersink Cage”, you might get a picture of it. The counter sinks are piloted to your hole size, #40, 30, 21, 10, and 1/4” and up, depending on the size screw hole your drilling. The cage is micrometer type adjustable for depth of countersink. It’s a tool used in the aircraft industry. There is even a flush cut cutter to cut away any protruding rivet head, or in the case of woodworkers, a plug that sits too proud. I can’t tell you if they clog or not as that has never been an issue to me. The angle is also different than that of woodworking countersinks, but wood is soft and will comform to the screw head…… Jerry (in Tucson…... Jerry (in Tucson)

-- Jerry (in Tucson)

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Nubsnstubs

258 posts in 482 days


#10 posted 12-23-2013 02:00 PM

When I was activly operating my cabinet shop, I bought 5 of those counter sinks pictured. They had 4 cutting edges instead of the one edge pictured. I don’t remember any clogging at all. I do remember the bits dulling or breaking off pretty regular.
Put in “Countersink Cage” into your browser and click on the ebay link. They have a bunch priced form $18 and up. The counter sinks are piloted to your hole size, #40, 30, 21, 10, and 1/4” and up, depending on the size screw hole your drilling. The cage is micrometer type adjustable for depth of countersink. It’s a tool used in the aircraft industry. I don’t know what they cost as it was a tool issued by the company. There is even a flush cut cutter to cut away any protruding rivet head, or in the case of woodworkers, a plug that sist too proud. I can’t tell you if they clog or not as that has never been an issue to me. The angle is also different than that of woodworking countersinks, but wood is soft and will comform to the screw head…... Jerry (in Tucson)

-- Jerry (in Tucson)

View shopdog's profile

shopdog

570 posts in 2237 days


#11 posted 12-23-2013 02:01 PM

I use the countersinks from Lee Valley. Pricey, but great.
Like others, I don’t use a stop collar because of the burn…I eyeball it.

-- Steve-- http://www.urbanexteriors.biz

View MrRon's profile

MrRon

2988 posts in 1995 days


#12 posted 12-23-2013 07:42 PM

The best drill/c’sink’s i’ve used ae called “Circlesink”. They were sold by Stanley, but I’m not sure if they still make them. I also have some of the ones you are having problems with and I don’t like them either.
In your picture, the bit is set for c’boring. If you only want to c’sink, does it still clog?

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Woodbum

487 posts in 1817 days


#13 posted 12-23-2013 08:47 PM

Try the Snappy Tools countersinks. They work well for me.

-- Improvidus, Apto quod Victum-- Improvise, Adapt, Overcome

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PRGDesigns

215 posts in 1065 days


#14 posted 12-24-2013 05:51 AM

Amana makes the model 55202 I have used for over 30 years.

-- They call me Mr. Silly

View nwbusa's profile

nwbusa

1017 posts in 1038 days


#15 posted 12-24-2013 06:17 AM

+1 on the Lee Valley kit.

-- John, BC, Canada

showing 1 through 15 of 26 replies

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