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Forum topic by Rob posted 12-21-2013 05:50 PM 3932 views 1 time favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Rob

229 posts in 2446 days


12-21-2013 05:50 PM

I have a Grizzly G0691 Table Saw and the worm gears, angle stops, and the mechanism that raises and lowers the blade gets gunked up after a while and it makes it hard to make adjustments leading to inaccurate settings, like when when returning the saw to square, raising/lowering the blade or setting an angle. I tend to clean most of the gunk out with an air hose when this happens and then go back to work but I started to wonder if any of you use any kind of brushes for the stubborn areas and do you use any lubricant on these areas to get a longer and smoother operation between cleanings? Your answers are greatly appreciated!


12 replies so far

View Tedstor's profile

Tedstor

1625 posts in 2092 days


#1 posted 12-21-2013 06:02 PM

An old toothbrush is my usual ‘go-to’ for cleaning gunk out of nooks and crannies.
I use only dry-lube on my machines. You can find it in any big box hardware store or you can get motorcycle chain lube from any cycle shop (same stuff in either case).
To add: dry-lube does not attract sawdust and other debris.

View Lifesaver2000's profile

Lifesaver2000

543 posts in 2571 days


#2 posted 12-21-2013 09:13 PM

I agree with Tedstor. I cleaned off all the heavy lubricant that came with my saw, and then sprayed all the working areas with a silicone dry lube. Works smoothly, and nothing ever sticks so I just blow off the loose dust and reapply once in a while.

When I did the original cleaning, I did use an old toothbrush and mineral spirits to get the heavy grease off of everything.

View gfadvm's profile

gfadvm

14940 posts in 2149 days


#3 posted 12-22-2013 02:02 AM

I probably am looking in the wrong section but the only dry lube I can find at the box stores is a graphite spray which is a lot of black mess and doesn’t work well on my saw parts.

Where do you all get your “dry lube” and what is it?

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

View Robert Brown's profile

Robert Brown

143 posts in 2151 days


#4 posted 12-22-2013 05:05 AM

View Rob's profile

Rob

229 posts in 2446 days


#5 posted 12-22-2013 03:15 PM

I’m going to try the boeshield. I already have that as I use it to keep my cast iron tables on all of my machines slick and free from rust. Never thought about using it on the gears.

View ohtimberwolf's profile

ohtimberwolf

634 posts in 1811 days


#6 posted 12-22-2013 04:12 PM

R Brown, just wondering if you might say why no silicone as I have used it and don’t want to get into any trouble over it. I’m sure others are wondering also. larry

-- Just a barn cat, now gone to cat heaven.

View OggieOglethorpe's profile

OggieOglethorpe

1209 posts in 1569 days


#7 posted 12-22-2013 04:47 PM

Silicone can cause fisheye problems with lacquers and lots of water based finishes. You can not have them for years, then a tiny amount of silicone migrates to another area of the shop, and it’s a PITA to eradicate. The properties that make silicone a great lube make it painful to remove.

Remember… ONE fisheye in the wrong spot can totally ruin your day…

I’m a big fan of the drip bottle Teflon based dry lubes sold in home centers, and motorcycle and bicycle shops. The less junk you attract, the longer you can go between maintenance sessions. I use them on most machine mechanisms that need to move, including gears, screw adjusters, and bushings.

This drip lube is one of my favorites, and is silicone-free. My local Lowes stores have it, in the tool area.

Folks should be aware that many of the PTFE products DO contain silicone. I assume they all do, unless they proudly state that they don’t.

I deal with silicone in lubes it by keeping the bottles well away from the finishing materials, as in another room with my automotive and bicycle stuff, and only handling the bottle with fresh neoprene gloves. The gloves, paper towels, etc… get disposed of outside the shop, not in the shop trash, immediately after use. Don’t put the bottle, gloves, etc… on your benches, tool tables, or shop tables. Drip lubes are easy to control, so I choose them over spray versions.

Silicon is an inert ingredient used to make electronic parts, sandpaper, glass, and metal alloys. It won’t mess with you in the shop.

Am I the only one who uses new toothbrushes (panty hose, too… but that’s another thread…)? They’re so cheap, my dentist gives me a handful for free at every cleaning, so we develop a supply in the the closet…

View ohtimberwolf's profile

ohtimberwolf

634 posts in 1811 days


#8 posted 12-22-2013 05:01 PM

Wow, I had no idea all that could happen. Thanks

-- Just a barn cat, now gone to cat heaven.

View woodmizer14's profile

woodmizer14

14 posts in 1090 days


#9 posted 12-22-2013 05:50 PM

I will try the Teflon products on my table saw.

-- Michael from Hickory North Carolina, michael.owenby@yahoo.com

View MedicKen's profile

MedicKen

1610 posts in 2921 days


#10 posted 12-22-2013 06:20 PM

Good old fashioned Johnsons Floor Wax. It is not petroleum based and will lube everything just fine. I will also not attract dust like an oil based lube will.

-- My job is to give my kids things to discuss with their therapist....medic20447@gmail.com

View Robert Brown's profile

Robert Brown

143 posts in 2151 days


#11 posted 12-22-2013 08:13 PM

Wax is good. I have used it too but found it easier to spray. And yes for sure not just any PTFE product will do. Make sure it says “Silicon Free”. Like CessnaPilotBarry, I deal with silicone in lubes & waxes by keeping it in the garage with my automotive and bicycle stuff separate from my basement wood shop.

View gfadvm's profile

gfadvm

14940 posts in 2149 days


#12 posted 12-23-2013 02:04 AM

Thanks all. I’ll be hitting the HD next week

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

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