LumberJocks

Wireing my shop?

  • Advertise with us

« back to Power Tools, Hardware and Accessories forum

Forum topic by Beginningwoodworker posted 12-16-2008 08:00 AM 1319 views 0 times favorited 18 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View Beginningwoodworker's profile

Beginningwoodworker

13345 posts in 3752 days


12-16-2008 08:00 AM

Topic tags/keywords: question

I am wondering how much trouble it would be to add a 115 volt and a 220 volt plug for my shop. I know I am going to need a couple of breakers, maybe a subpanel and some 10 guage wiring.


18 replies so far

View MedicKen's profile

MedicKen

1615 posts in 3541 days


#1 posted 12-16-2008 08:15 AM

I just recently added multiple 110v and 220V circuits in my 2 car garage shop. I was lucky in that the my panel for the house was 200amp and I had enough room to add the circuits I wanted. The panel is also located on an exterior wall in the garage which made things even easier.

The work is not the hard part, it the planning that will take more time. Make sure that you look at the amp draw of you machines, especially ones that will be running at the same time, i.e. table saw and dust collector> If they are both 220V they should be on seperate circuits. Also, wire your lighting on a separate circuit so that if you do trip a breaker you are not plunged into darkness, could be dangerous if you are at the table saw.

I would also make sure that you size the wiring appropriately. If you are not sure there are multiple wiring books available.

I did make a mistake and wired the circuit for my air compressor too small. I put in a 20amp and should have gone with 30, my mistake and I will have to live with it. The lighting is on 2 dedicated curcuits, 15 amp. the misc wall outlets are all 20amp and I have 2 220v 20amp for table saw and dust collector. I also placed all the outlets 48” above the floor, that way I can lean a 4×8 plywood sheet against a wall and still have access to power.

If you are having to tear into finished walls, drywall etc. It would a good idea to run wiring for future machine purchases. Like I said earlier planning is the hardest part of the process.

Good luck…..Ken

-- My job is to give my kids things to discuss with their therapist....medic20447@gmail.com

View JJackson's profile

JJackson

104 posts in 4161 days


#2 posted 12-16-2008 03:02 PM

As MedicKen has stated, its not a tough job. I just recently ran two extra 220 lines in my shop, one for a new jointer and another cause I did not want to get back in the attic again! But I have been wiring for many years and I will say if you have never done it, I would say stay out of the box. Its worth you time finding someone who knows what they are doing if you have doubts. Getting hit with 110 sucks, but getting hit with 220 is pretty much forever. Be careful.

-- Jeff, Indiana

View 8iowa's profile

8iowa

1581 posts in 3840 days


#3 posted 12-16-2008 04:53 PM

Jeff has given great advice. If one is not familiar with the National Electric Code and local codes as well, then it would be wise to engage the services of a licensed electrician. Every year substand electrical work causes many deaths, injuries, and property loss.

-- "Heaven is North of the Bridge"

View Beginningwoodworker's profile

Beginningwoodworker

13345 posts in 3752 days


#4 posted 12-16-2008 04:59 PM

I am going to get a electrician to do the wireing.

View Woodchuck1957's profile

Woodchuck1957

944 posts in 3843 days


#5 posted 12-16-2008 08:36 PM

You ask how much trouble it would be, well it’s hard to say. Is your shop attached to the house ? Or is it a seperate building ? After that it depends on how many circuits and outlets you want. I would suggest that you call a local licensed electricial contractor if you want a bid and the work done, they know what the code is in your area and will be able to actually see whats doable. This is not a doit yourself prodject Charles, and I strongly advise that you DO NOT attempt to do it yourself in anyway. If you do so, your putting your own life in jeapardy and anyone else that enters your shop.

View Todd A. Clippinger's profile

Todd A. Clippinger

8901 posts in 4178 days


#6 posted 12-16-2008 08:52 PM

I back WoodChuck on calling in the pro.

I am assuming the shop is an outbuilding that is separate from your house.

You can save some money by doing any of the trenching and prepwork necessary for the electrician, but I would say hire it done.

I am a pro remodeler and I have seen a lot of bad wiring in my line of work. DANGEROUS wiring done by the homeowner or a handyman.

-- Todd A. Clippinger, Montana, http://americancraftsmanworkshop.com

View Beginningwoodworker's profile

Beginningwoodworker

13345 posts in 3752 days


#7 posted 12-17-2008 12:39 AM

Its a seperate building and I wont be doing any wiring. I am a carpenter! :)

View Beginningwoodworker's profile

Beginningwoodworker

13345 posts in 3752 days


#8 posted 12-17-2008 12:40 AM

Its a 10×12 shed in my back yard.

View EEngineer's profile

EEngineer

1113 posts in 3692 days


#9 posted 12-17-2008 02:44 AM

I laugh every time one of these threads starts up. I rewired my entire house to eliminate old knob and tube wiring and then proceeded to live in it for 20 years. I did look up local codes and I do know electricity, but wiring is not some arcane art.

The web is full of decent wiring guides, local codes are, by law, freely available and, if you can handle woodworking without losing any fingers, then you can wire your shop without burning it down.

-- "Find out what you cannot do and then go do it!"

View juniorjock's profile

juniorjock

1930 posts in 3844 days


#10 posted 12-17-2008 03:23 AM

Hire someone…..... You’re a woodworker…... not an electrician.
-JJ

View juniorjock's profile

juniorjock

1930 posts in 3844 days


#11 posted 12-17-2008 03:36 AM

I don’t think it is good to encourage someone to do something they are not comfortable with.
-JJ

View EEngineer's profile

EEngineer

1113 posts in 3692 days


#12 posted 12-17-2008 05:51 AM

If he is not comfortable with it, that’s fine. But this constant whining about burning the house down if you do your own wiring is nonsense.

Yes, electricity is dangerous; so are power tools. Why doesn’t anybody here hire someone to do their woodworking? Ooooh, the tools are sharp! You’ll cut your fingers off!

Read my tagline: “Find out what you cannot do and then go do it!” It’s how we live and grow as human beings.

-- "Find out what you cannot do and then go do it!"

View fredf's profile

fredf

495 posts in 3789 days


#13 posted 12-17-2008 07:11 AM

If you can afford it, put a subpanel in your shed, that way you dont have to keep digging to add circuits

-- Fred, Springfield, Ma

View bhack's profile

bhack

349 posts in 3799 days


#14 posted 12-17-2008 05:42 PM

Work a deal with the pro. You do all the physical work and he does the brain work. Its amazing how much you can learn and gain the confidence to to tackle other projects. This is a great learning experience for you.

-- Bill - If I knew GRANDKIDS were so much fun I would have had them first.

View Woodchuck1957's profile

Woodchuck1957

944 posts in 3843 days


#15 posted 12-17-2008 06:08 PM

A deal ? You know what they say, $100 an hour, $200 an hour if you help. ( Just a guess on the hourly rate, and only for demonstration purposes. )

showing 1 through 15 of 18 replies

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com