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Sharpening plane blades and chisels

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Forum topic by ashahidan posted 12-21-2013 02:53 AM 1467 views 0 times favorited 26 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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ashahidan

64 posts in 2566 days


12-21-2013 02:53 AM

When my chisel or ny plane blade get dull I rubs the cutting edge bevel on a piece of fine sandpaper a few times and get it sharp again very quickly.(T am bad at sharpening on the oilstone.) Does anybody ever do this way?

Shahidan

-- asm


26 replies so far

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pmayer

864 posts in 2532 days


#1 posted 12-21-2013 02:57 AM

Yep, I do this as well. This is a popular approach to sharpening. If you search around the web for “scary sharp” you will find a lot of variations on this technique.

-- PaulMayer, http://www.vernswoodgoods.com

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ashahidan

64 posts in 2566 days


#2 posted 12-22-2013 05:28 AM

pmayer,

I thought I was doing something wrong !

Merry Christmas to you.

-- asm

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b2rtch

4823 posts in 2515 days


#3 posted 12-22-2013 10:37 AM

You can still do wrong doing good.
Scary sharpening is very popular because it is easy and effective and if done a little is is inexpensive.
I started sharpening my tool using this technique and I was very happy with it but if you do it quite a bit as I did and if you buy the sand paper as I did , it gets pretty expensive,
I have a floated glass on which I apply the self adhesive sand paper (the best one is found at klingspor)
http://www.woodworkingshop.com/
You need a large piece floated glass (12×24) or of granite or another surface large enough ( cast iron table saw or jointer) and very flat and you need and self adhesives sand paper from about 100 grit to 2000 grit or better.

You will find many tutorial on the Internet about this method but if you are just starting and if you are serious about sharpening your tools I recommend that you switch immediately to diamond stone.( not water stones).
In the beginning they are more expensive but in the long run they are easier to use (unlike water stones you do not have to flatten them , to keep them in water or to take special care of them).
I now use diamond stone and a leather strap to a put a glass mirror finish on my tools, it works very well and diamond stone cut faster then water stones.
In addition diamond stones will last you a life time (or just about)

Merry CHRIST-mas to you too.

-- Bert

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hydro

208 posts in 1219 days


#4 posted 12-22-2013 07:26 PM

ashahidan, If what you are doing is getting your tools sharp enough to cut cleanly, then keep doing it! The only real problem I see with using abrasive paper is that it wears out quickly and can get expensive. I would recommend getting some practice with a fine oil stone as that will be better in the long term.

In the Unites States today there is way too much focus on the new and expensive sharpening equipment. We seem to have forgotten how to use what works and want to look for the next fancy tool or method.

-- Minnesota Woodworkers Guild, Past President, Lifetime member.

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racerglen

3112 posts in 2247 days


#5 posted 12-22-2013 07:52 PM

x2 hydro !

-- Glen, B.C. Canada

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Don W

17971 posts in 2035 days


#6 posted 12-22-2013 07:59 PM

I’m having a hard time understanding how you have a hard time with oil stones but not sandpaper. Are your stones not flat?

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.net

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b2rtch

4823 posts in 2515 days


#7 posted 12-22-2013 08:49 PM

it easier to use sand paper than any kind of stone

-- Bert

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ScrubPlane

190 posts in 1663 days


#8 posted 12-23-2013 04:27 PM

Question for the group and particularly those who prefer stones.

I myself wrestled as to which direction to go…stone or the scary sharp method.

After reviewing the cost of four to five different stone grips plus the diamond ‘truing’ stone I came to the conclusion that all of those materials will be buy a tremendous amount of sandpaper.

Did anyone else consider the decision from this angle and if you chose the stone method what was your determing factors?

Thanks…

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ScrubPlane

190 posts in 1663 days


#9 posted 12-23-2013 04:28 PM

Question for the group and particularly those who prefer stones.

I myself wrestled as to which direction to go…stone or the scary sharp method.

After reviewing the cost of four to five different stone grips plus the diamond ‘truing’ stone I came to the conclusion that all of those materials will be buy a tremendous amount of sandpaper.

Did anyone else consider the decision from this angle and if you chose the stone method what were your determing factors?

Thanks…

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hydro

208 posts in 1219 days


#10 posted 12-23-2013 04:55 PM

Scrub,

You can dive in to sharpening equipment as deep as your pockets will allow when buying into all of the newest and greatest sharpening stones, accessories, etc., but you really do not need all of that stuff to put an edge on your tools. A bit of skill with the stones that you have will go much further than a bench full of $$$$$ that you don’t really know how to use well. A good white aluminum oxide grinding wheel to do basic edge shaping will get the tool ready and a good stone with a fine grit will put the edge on. If you want, a second stone with a very fine grit will polish that edge. I use Arkansas stones but that’s just my preference, and the sandpaper technique will also work well when used effectively.

You do not need a diamond “truing stone” to keep the honing stones flat. If they develop a belly, lap them back to flat with some carbide lapidary grit on a scrap of granite from a countertop shop (you can probably get that for free from their scrap bin). Simple and easy to do.

-- Minnesota Woodworkers Guild, Past President, Lifetime member.

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b2rtch

4823 posts in 2515 days


#11 posted 12-23-2013 04:57 PM

“of four to five different stone grips’
you do not need them.
You can either build your own or (like I do) use this stuff which grip to put on the shelf in cabinet.It works perfect.
http://www.amazon.com/Grip-Shelf-Drawer-Liner-Black/dp/B000KFSOFI/ref=sr_1_sc_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1387817737&sr=8-1-spell&keywords=anti+skidshelf+liner

Buy Diamond stones, they will last you a very long time.

I would stay away from water stones, they are expensive, high maintenance and they do not last.

-- Bert

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chadirvin

29 posts in 1506 days


#12 posted 12-23-2013 05:19 PM

What grit diamond stones would a newbie need to get started?

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dbray45

3187 posts in 2244 days


#13 posted 12-23-2013 05:43 PM

I have the DMT 3”x 8” steel plates from x-fine through course and a 8000 grit water stone. Yes, this was a pricey way to go but I could easily justify it in the following:

The plates will last for 20 years, the course one flattens the 8000 stone.
I use these plates to sharpen knives, scissors, chisels, blades, drill bits etc… This matters when you clean a good sized chip out of a blade.

I have used them to clean the edges of glassware, stemware, windows, and mirrors. They will polish and sharpen carbide.

And finally, if I need some weight in a glue up, they work for that as well. —multitaskers!

I have tried the scary-sharp – not my thing. I have worn out or broken several water stones, and the oil stones can get messy. If you don’t clean all the oil and chips off and it gets into the wood, it can ruin the piece.

I realize that what I do is one of 10,000 ways of doing this, but it works for me.

-- David in Damascus, MD

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b2rtch

4823 posts in 2515 days


#14 posted 12-23-2013 05:49 PM

Diamond stone are general sold not bu grit but by coarseness(?)
You will need three : coarse, fine and extra-fine.
The more polished an edge is, the sharper it is and the longer it lasts.
An extra fine diamond stone is not quite fine enough to get a polished edge, you could use 3000 grit sand paper, or a water stone to get this edge.
http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss_2?url=search-alias%3Daps&field-keywords=3000+grit+sand+paper&rh=i%3Aaps%2Ck%3A3000+grit+sand+paper

This does not contradict what I wrote before, this is the very final touch to the edge, it will take very little sanding to do this.
You also could use a leather strop to to get this final polish.
You need to polish not only the cutting edge but also may be a 1/4” of the back of the blade to obtain and excellent cutting edge.

-- Bert

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dbray45

3187 posts in 2244 days


#15 posted 12-23-2013 06:04 PM

Bert – Hence the 8,000 grit water stone – polishes to a mirror .

-- David in Damascus, MD

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