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Jointer SetUp Tip That Might Help Someone

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Forum topic by Targa posted 12-19-2013 04:24 PM 1291 views 5 times favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Targa

117 posts in 1204 days


12-19-2013 04:24 PM

I just finally solved a very frustrating problem I have been experiencing with my new Grizzly G0452P 6” jointer that I thought is worth passing on since I’m a newbie who is usually asking the questions.

My problem, like 100+ other people who I read about in the archives, involves my jointer making tapered face and edge cuts. Specifically, the knives were cutting the leading several inches of a board and then as you push the remainder of the board through the cutter head you didn’t hear the sound of the knives cutting the balance of the board and thereby leaving a significant taper.

For the last couple of days I’ve been checking and double checking to make sure my infeed and outfeed tables are co-planer (which they were from the factory) and that my knifes are at top dead center in alignment with the outfeed table just as the Grizzly owners manual and a million discussions on the internet says is correct. Well, it is not correct with my jointer, and it may not be with yours.

I then adjusted the outfeed table like a few articles and threads I found last night on the internet suggested, which was to lower it just enough so that when you manually turn the cutter head with a straight edge on the outfeed table, extended over the cutter head, each knife would move the straight edge toward the infeed table between 1/8” – 1/4”.

I made this adjustment this morning and my jointer is now consistently making straight cuts with zero taper.

I thought I would pass my findings along in the event it might help someone else.

-- Dom


14 replies so far

View pintodeluxe's profile (online now)

pintodeluxe

4856 posts in 2277 days


#1 posted 12-19-2013 05:02 PM

I agree, dialing in the outfeed table height relative to the blades will minimize taper cuts.
There still is no guarantee that it won’t taper slightly after multiple passes, but that is what a planer is for.
As long as I can consistently get the desired thickness from my rough lumber, I am happy.

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

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bbc557ci

589 posts in 1538 days


#2 posted 12-19-2013 05:11 PM

I remember setting up my 6 in. Powermatic jointer several years ago, and your “correction” is almost exactly what was in the Powermatic instructions. Don’t know why Griz would be any different, but who knows??

-- Bill, central NY...no where near the "big apple"

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7Footer

2541 posts in 1413 days


#3 posted 12-19-2013 05:43 PM

Interesting thank you, I have an older Delta I picked up off of CL and its been making tapered cuts since I got it so I haven’t really used it. I haven’t had hardly any time to adjust it and try to get it dialed in, but this is something I will try once I get some dedicated shop tune-up time.

Question – when you are adjusting the outfeed table, what cut depth should you have the jointer set to? Should it be set to 0 or the smallest cut possible?

-- http://www.youtube.com/nrk411

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Mark Davisson

597 posts in 2782 days


#4 posted 12-19-2013 05:45 PM

Can anyone explain why it is that the correct setup is as Targa describes?

-- I'm selfless because it feels so good!

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pintodeluxe

4856 posts in 2277 days


#5 posted 12-19-2013 05:58 PM

Basically, the tables need to be coplanar to flatten lumber effectively. Draw two lines on a piece of paper. One line represents the infeed table and the other represents the outfeed table. You can visualize how an outfeed table that is tilted upward would affect the cut. The first few inches of the board will be jointed, however as the leading edge of the board is raised by the outfeed table, the cut starts to taper off. The misalignment might be slight, but it becomes compounded after multiple cuts.

If you can get all four corners of both tables to be coplanar within about .02” you will have good results.
The Wood Whisperer, and Fine Woodworking both have excellent jointer setup information.

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

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Targa

117 posts in 1204 days


#6 posted 12-19-2013 06:33 PM

7Footer said –

“Question – when you are adjusting the outfeed table, what cut depth should you have the jointer set to? Should it be set to 0 or the smallest cut possible?”

I had my infeed table set at a cut depth of 1/32” when I adjusted the outfeed table. So, yes, I think the infeed table should be set to 0 or less so it doesn’t make contact with the straight edge on the outfeed table.

-- Dom

View Mark Davisson's profile

Mark Davisson

597 posts in 2782 days


#7 posted 12-19-2013 06:55 PM

pintodeluxe, I get that. But why should the blades be set just slightly proud of the height of the outfeed table? Is it to allow for the compression-decompression of the wood fibres as the blades whack it into submission?

-- I'm selfless because it feels so good!

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pintodeluxe

4856 posts in 2277 days


#8 posted 12-19-2013 07:27 PM

Mark,
Not really proud of the outfeed table, just high enough so the board doesn’t hang up as it is jointed. If you used a dial indicator you would know for sure. I’m guessing the “stick drag” method of setting jointer knives places the knives a thousandth of an inch higher than the outfeed table.
If the blades are actually higher than the outfeed, you will get snipe.

It is an interesting topic. Setting up a jointer make a woodworker feel like an engineer.

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

View Mark Davisson's profile

Mark Davisson

597 posts in 2782 days


#9 posted 12-19-2013 07:32 PM

This is what I’m referring to: Targa wrote, ...internet suggested, which was to lower it just enough so that when you manually turn the cutter head with a straight edge on the outfeed table, extended over the cutter head, each knife would move the straight edge toward the infeed table between 1/8” – 1/4”.

It seems to me that Targa is saying the blade should make contact with the straight edge 1/16” to 1/8” prior to top dead center and keep contact with it until 1/16” to 1/8” after top dead center. That tells me the outfeed table is set lower than the blade.

-- I'm selfless because it feels so good!

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jonah

687 posts in 2763 days


#10 posted 12-19-2013 08:15 PM

Wait, if I understand your original post properly, you have set the outfeed table to be lower than the infeed? That is the opposite of what I’ve always understood to be the best way, so that the outfeed table is ever so slightly (~1/32nd or slightly more) higher than the infeed table. The explanation I’ve always gotten is that since you are removing a bit of material from the board at the cutter head, you want to have the already-cut part of the piece be fully supported (coplanar to the infeed but slightly offset) on the outfeed table. Otherwise, logically, you could get a tapered piece.

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Targa

117 posts in 1204 days


#11 posted 12-19-2013 08:18 PM

pintodeluxe said -

“I’m guessing the “stick drag” method of setting jointer knives places the knives a thousandth of an inch higher than the outfeed table”

Out of curiosity, I just measured the relationship of the height of the knives on my jointer and the outfeed table after making the adjustment I described and the knives are about .002 higher at TDC.

It me point out that I’m not suggesting the adjustment I did to solve my problem is the correct and only method, I’m saying it solved my taper problem and hopefully others could benefit from my experience.

I suspect there must be some credence to what I did because ”bbc557ci” mentioned the Powermatic instructions he had for his jointer stated almost the some method.

-- Dom

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pintodeluxe

4856 posts in 2277 days


#12 posted 12-19-2013 08:35 PM

Mark,
The 1/8-1/4” is the distance a stick of straight lumber will move when it is struck by the blade.
It is a common blade setting technique that allows you to accurately set jointer knives without a dial indicator.
Basically you just start with the outfeed table higher than the blades, and lower it until the blades barely catch a piece of wood. Of course you are manually rotating the cutterhead, and the tool is unplugged.

Dom,
If your blades are 1-2 thou above the outfeed, you are in good shape.

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

View b2rtch's profile

b2rtch

4822 posts in 2513 days


#13 posted 12-19-2013 08:49 PM

pintodeluxe, I think that you got it wrong at the beginning of your explanation. I believe that you have an issue when your out feed table is pointing down, not up as you wrote,as you advance the piece of wood on the out-feed table the end raises up way from the knives, if the table pointing up , you increase the cut.
Am i correct?

-- Bert

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JL7

8426 posts in 2429 days


#14 posted 06-26-2014 06:04 PM

Great tip – and it works…...appreciate it…

-- Jeff .... Minnesota, USA

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