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Forum topic by Padre posted 12-15-2008 02:19 AM 1060 views 0 times favorited 15 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Padre

930 posts in 3568 days


12-15-2008 02:19 AM

I am just staring out turning, and I need to replace a tool set my brother-in-law gave me, and I came across this set on Amazon. Any opinions? http://www.amazon.com/PSI-Woodworking-LCHSS8-Piece-Chisel/dp/B000KI8CTS/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=hi&qid=1229302384&sr=8-1

-- Chip -----------http://www.penmanchip.com-----------------Micah 6:8


15 replies so far

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lew

12204 posts in 3834 days


#1 posted 12-15-2008 02:51 AM

Sorry, couldn’t get the link to work.

-- Lew- Time traveler. Purveyor of the Universe's finest custom rolling pins.

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Padre

930 posts in 3568 days


#2 posted 12-15-2008 02:55 AM

I put it in the body of the text instead.

-- Chip -----------http://www.penmanchip.com-----------------Micah 6:8

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lew

12204 posts in 3834 days


#3 posted 12-15-2008 03:06 AM

I started with a set similar to these and still have a few. Some have been modified to cut special purposes and not used very often. Others were given away when I sold my first lathe.

Mine didn’t stay sharp very long and the roughing gouges were not very heavily made. (BTW mine were not PSI). Also, mine did not have very “beefy” handle to tool connections.

As much as I hate it, now I pay about that much for a single tool.

-- Lew- Time traveler. Purveyor of the Universe's finest custom rolling pins.

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Padre

930 posts in 3568 days


#4 posted 12-15-2008 03:09 AM

Would it be better to just bite the bullet and buy something like a Larson set?

-- Chip -----------http://www.penmanchip.com-----------------Micah 6:8

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jeffthewoodwacker

603 posts in 3883 days


#5 posted 12-15-2008 03:16 AM

Those tools would make a good starter set for a beginner. I would not invest big money on turning tools until you are comfortable and decide to stay with turning. Whatever tools you purchase learn how to sharpen those tools – the number one frustration for beginners is when the tool gets dull. Even if you purchase the most expensive turning tool made if it is not sharp it will not function well. New tools normally need to be touched up right out of the box. Buy the starter set of tools, invest in a slow grinder and a jig. Find a wood turning club in your area and take some sharpening lessons or if there is a woodworking store near where you live find out if they offer a sharpening class. As you become more experienced at turning start buying good tools a few at a time. I find great deals on Craigslist, Ebay and auctions. Good luck turning and remember life is to short to turn crappy wood!

-- Those that say it can't be done should not interrupt those who are doing it.

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lew

12204 posts in 3834 days


#6 posted 12-15-2008 03:28 PM

Jeff is absolutely correct. Buying a less expensive starter set will get you all you need to begin turning. As you learn to use each one, you will begin to see what, if anything, would make it better. You will also see which tools you use the most- or not at all. Also, as you are learning to sharpen the tools, a mistake on a cheap tool is far less costly than a mistake on an expensive one.

As jeff pointed out, try to find a local woodturners club. It sure beats trying to learn out of a book! Do a Internet search for Woodturning sites. Many have online videos that can be very helpful, too.

-- Lew- Time traveler. Purveyor of the Universe's finest custom rolling pins.

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snowdog

1165 posts in 4062 days


#7 posted 12-15-2008 04:51 PM

If you know how to keep a tool sharp then you can use just about anything. I am still working on getting my skills up with turning tools. I bought a Pinnacle set of 8 for about $100 on sale and they stay sharp, I am very happy with them.

-- "so much to learn and so little time"..

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jeffthewoodwacker

603 posts in 3883 days


#8 posted 12-15-2008 05:13 PM

You can use almost anything to turn with if you know how to keep it sharp. I have used dental tools (I gave my dentist a bowl and ever since then he gives me all his discarded tools) old kitchen knifes, screwdrivers ground down and sharpened, hex wrenches that I have bent, heated up and sharpened and even 16 penny nails that I have ground down and inserted into a handle. Some guys have used old files with success but you have to be careful with these as they are brittle and sometimes break easily. A good link is www.woodturner.org which takes you to the American Association of Woodturners site. From there you can find woodturning clubs near your area. Many of my tools and most of my handles are hand made and customized to what I like to turn.

-- Those that say it can't be done should not interrupt those who are doing it.

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Padre

930 posts in 3568 days


#9 posted 12-15-2008 07:16 PM

I just ordered the Tormek T-7 Ultimate sharpening system. This will help me keep my tools sharp, but now I can’t afford a really expensive set of turning tools. The one’s my brother-in-law gave me were from HF I believe, and they still have some life in them, and hopefully the T-7 will give them a little more life.

Thank you all so much for your comments!

-- Chip -----------http://www.penmanchip.com-----------------Micah 6:8

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8iowa

1581 posts in 3840 days


#10 posted 12-16-2008 04:57 PM

Shopsmith has a nice basic set of turning tools on sale;

http://www.shopsmith.com/ownersite/catalog/l_lathechisels.htm

-- "Heaven is North of the Bridge"

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rtb

1101 posts in 3792 days


#11 posted 12-16-2008 05:21 PM

1. listen to Jeff.
2. A DULL TURNING CHISEL IS AN INVITATION TO AN EMERGENCY ROOM.

-- RTB. stray animals are just looking for love

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Moron

5032 posts in 3972 days


#12 posted 12-16-2008 05:28 PM

I find that even crappy tools, if sharp, work better then high quality tools that are dull.

That said,patience is a virtue so I waited to buy my turning tools and picked up over forty Sorby’s and a few others at an auction for 400 bucks. Most of the Sorby’s list for 150 bucks each.

Cheers

-- "Good artists borrow, great artists steal”…..Picasso

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Padre

930 posts in 3568 days


#13 posted 12-16-2008 07:39 PM

Wow, what a deal! I keep looking, and looking…........................... :)

-- Chip -----------http://www.penmanchip.com-----------------Micah 6:8

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jeffthewoodwacker

603 posts in 3883 days


#14 posted 12-18-2008 01:13 AM

Try looking on Craigslist and Ebay. Watch for auctions in your area. If all else fails hit the flea markets and garage sales – I have found some great turning tools at really cheap prices.

-- Those that say it can't be done should not interrupt those who are doing it.

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bob101

321 posts in 3529 days


#15 posted 12-18-2008 10:52 PM

Lee valley has a great selection of turning tools from moderate price to high end. I don’t do alot of turning but I do use my lathe a couple or so times a year, I like a long handled sharp tool and if I was to spend money on one chisel it woul be a big roughing gouge. And also I sharpen them often, and usually by hand with silicon carbide sheets.

-- rob, ont,canada

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