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Cork Flooring - Any experience?

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Forum topic by chrisstef posted 12-18-2013 02:35 PM 1451 views 0 times favorited 37 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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chrisstef

15677 posts in 2474 days


12-18-2013 02:35 PM

Topic tags/keywords: cork floor

For the last 4 months ive been working on a kitchen remodel and its time that I started to think about replacing our ceramic tile flooring. My wife had an idea of using cork flooring. Reading some online reviews ive gotten quite a bit of different reviews on the product. There seems to be the floating, click lock type with a HDF core and the glue down type, they come both prefinished and unfinished. Does anyone out there have any first hand experience with this type of flooring?

-- rock, chalk, jayhawk


37 replies so far

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BentheViking

1763 posts in 2031 days


#1 posted 12-18-2013 03:18 PM

PM sent

-- It's made of wood. Real sturdy.--Chubbs Peterson

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Hammerthumb

2533 posts in 1442 days


#2 posted 12-18-2013 03:28 PM

Stef – I’ve done several of the different types of cork floors. I am not particular to the MDF cored click together (or glue together) types. I would rather install the 12”x12” squares. The MDF type is suseptible to problems with moisture issues causing it to cup. This could be a problem especially in a kitchen. The 12”x12” tiles are 100% cork, not cork veneer over a core. It is the MDF core that can be problematic. In saying this, the MDF core planks can be floated over an existing floor just like a laminate floor and makes installation easier. The 100% cork tiles are made to be glued to a concrete or plywood substrate using the flooring adhesives recommended by the manufacturer. Cork floors are very comfortable to walk on and are very durable. The tile type product can even be resanded if wear and tear becomes and issue. There are some floors in cities like San Francisco that have been used in a commercial environment which were installed in the 40s and 50s and are still in use today. It is still used commercially in workout rooms at health clubs and would make a great shop floor (would not have to worry about dropping tools).

-- Paul, Las Vegas

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waho6o9

7179 posts in 2044 days


#3 posted 12-18-2013 03:36 PM

With all due respect…

Q. What is HDF and what is it made of?

A. High density fiberboard, HDF, is basically a high-density, moisture-resistant fiber panel. It is made of wood residues (sawdust, shavings and wood chips) from wood processing factories. This ligneous material is ground into a pulp to which a melamine-urea-formaldehyde resin is added. This pulp is then dried and pressed into panels.

I did a double take and had to find out what HDF was.

100% cork is best in my opinion.

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chrisstef

15677 posts in 2474 days


#4 posted 12-18-2013 03:45 PM

Thanks for the info Paul. I agree that the HDF core is a bad idea in a kitchen. Id hate to see it cup on me and look like death. Ill be tearing up the ceramic tile that’s existing in the kitchen so im really not sure if ill be able to get all the thin set up. Like a vinyl tile im sure that any imperfections in the subfloor will show through. So if ive got to lay down a 1/4” sheet good things are going to start adding up quickly. Do you have a manufacturer of any solid cork flooring that you could hook it up with?

-- rock, chalk, jayhawk

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Hammerthumb

2533 posts in 1442 days


#5 posted 12-18-2013 03:45 PM

Sorry – I typed MDF when in reallity it is HDF that is used. Still, agree with waho – 100% cork is best.

-- Paul, Las Vegas

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Hammerthumb

2533 posts in 1442 days


#6 posted 12-18-2013 04:00 PM

WECU is a manufacturer that I have used before. Type in We-Cork in your searchfu browser. We-Cork is the name of the product. I looked for the number, but must have it in the rolodex at home.

-- Paul, Las Vegas

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chrisstef

15677 posts in 2474 days


#7 posted 12-18-2013 04:00 PM

Jackpot …. thanks Paul.

-- rock, chalk, jayhawk

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Hammerthumb

2533 posts in 1442 days


#8 posted 12-18-2013 04:05 PM

Yeah – been doing commercial flooring for a long time. Installation, distribution, project management, and finally I am with a large commercial tile & stone company. Seen and used a lot of products in my time.

-- Paul, Las Vegas

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chrisstef

15677 posts in 2474 days


#9 posted 12-18-2013 04:10 PM

With that said ill continue to ask more question ;)

Final finishing …. water based polyurethane? au natural? prefinished? other suggestions?

Obviously the kitchen floor takes a good beating with food particles, drips, baby vomit, etc so id like it to be protected and not stain when the inevitable happens.

-- rock, chalk, jayhawk

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Hammerthumb

2533 posts in 1442 days


#10 posted 12-18-2013 04:12 PM

By the way, I believe the tiles are 5/16” thick and do not transmit imperfections thru them like VCT and sheet vinyl does. If you get most of the thinset up and then rent a Clark buffer with a hardplate, you could sand off the residual thinset with 20grit open coat.

-- Paul, Las Vegas

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Hammerthumb

2533 posts in 1442 days


#11 posted 12-18-2013 04:16 PM

By the prefinished. It is easier to install as you dont need to do any finishing, and the adhesive cleans off of it easier when you’re installing. Flooring adhesive is like roofing mastic in the sense that if you get a little bit on your elbow, it will eventually migrate to your face, $ss, knees, and the top of the flooring.

-- Paul, Las Vegas

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AnthonyReed

8743 posts in 1907 days


#12 posted 12-18-2013 04:17 PM

^Hahah.

-- ~Tony

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chrisstef

15677 posts in 2474 days


#13 posted 12-18-2013 04:21 PM

Yea it seems that they come in 3/16 and 5/16. Glad to hear it wont transfer the imperfections. Also happy to hear that prefinished is acceptable, itll keep the boss happy and less work for me!

Ive had roofing mastic on my a$$ .... you probably don’t wanna inquire much further.

-- rock, chalk, jayhawk

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OggieOglethorpe

1213 posts in 1577 days


#14 posted 12-18-2013 04:29 PM

I put engineered cork in my own kitchen two years ago, over existing VCT…

It’s inexpensive, looks good, hides dirt well, was simple and fast to install, and is comfortable to walk on. It does not transmit texture of the VCT below.

Unfortunately, our brand new dishwasher had an incorrectly installed door seal. The leak swelled and stained some of the flooring in front of the dishwasher. The good side is that the damaged sections will be inexpensive and simple to fix, the bad is that it needs fixing. The rest of the floor has held up well, even though it’s the main path to the garage and our cleaning lady can get a bit spirited with a mop.

I think the leak would have also damaged wood, and possibly stained grout lines. I don’t think the leak would have damaged linoleum or VCT.

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chrisstef

15677 posts in 2474 days


#15 posted 12-18-2013 04:38 PM

Like you Barry, our kitchen is the main path in and out of the house. Besides the day that we moved in I don’t think ive used the front door. I think that no matter what you put down its going to have its pros and cons. Thanks for the first hand user info.

A little searchfu has turned about about a dozen retailers of the WeCork flooring in the area. That’s good news as im sure wifey and I will want to put her hands on it before any sort of purchase. I like tangible.

-- rock, chalk, jayhawk

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