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End Grain cutting board questions from a new guy...

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Forum topic by gr8outdrsmn posted 2083 days ago 2094 views 1 time favorited 10 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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gr8outdrsmn

60 posts in 2085 days


2083 days ago

Topic tags/keywords: endgrain cuttingboard

Wow, those things are beautiful. I am definitely going to make some for friends and family that I know would appreciate them. Problem is, I know the first one or two might get messed up in the process, so I want to make them out of less expensive woods than the Purple Heart and Hard Maple Combo. I have seen some made with Walnut. What other woods can I use that will be less expensive (still being nice to look at), but still be durable enough for regular use? Thanks

Brian

-- Don't take life too seriously, you'll never get out alive.


10 replies so far

View closetguy's profile

closetguy

744 posts in 2524 days


#1 posted 2083 days ago

No guts, no glory….:)

You can make them out of anything, except pine.

-- I don't make mistakes, only design changes....www.dgmwoodworks.com

View PetVet's profile

PetVet

329 posts in 2119 days


#2 posted 2083 days ago

You could do them out of maple and walnut. Still nice wood, but not terribly expensive, and they look really good together. Watch the wood whisperer’s video pod cast to get a good tutorial on making them.
Areas to pay attention to:
Make sure the contrasting woods are all exactly the same width.
On the second glue up watch the corners that make up the checkerboard pattern. You want the corners of each block to be dead on.
If you end up with any gaps that aren’t filled with glue you can take some of the maple sawdust, dilute some glue with water and make a slurry out of the sawdust. Work this into the gaps, let dry and sand. Will give you a really nice smooth surface.
Good luck, make sure you post them!!

-- Rich in Richmond -- Experience is something you don't get until just after you need it.

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Moron

4666 posts in 2525 days


#3 posted 2083 days ago

walnut is toxic and a poor choice for a cutting board …......so I would check out the toxicity of the wood specie chosen before making them.

There is a reason most cutting boards are maple and beech

-- "Good artists borrow, great artists steal”…..Picasso

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PetVet

329 posts in 2119 days


#4 posted 2080 days ago

Actually, roman, walnut is quiet safe to use in a cutting board or salad bowl. It has been used for these for hundreds of years. The walnut root and bark can be irritating, and the sawdust is a natural herbicide, but it is a perfectly safe wood to use in cutting boards.

In fact, those into herbal remedies will use black walnut to treat various ailments. Go to: http://www.drugdigest.org and search black walnut.

That being said, it is important to know the properties of the woods we use where food may come in contact with them. That is why you don’t see maple and hemlock cutting boards :)

-- Rich in Richmond -- Experience is something you don't get until just after you need it.

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Moron

4666 posts in 2525 days


#5 posted 2080 days ago

I’ve been wrong so many times so maybe I am wrong again. Just an observation but when walnut shavings are added to a garden just about every plant in the garden seems to grow like it has cancer, mold etc and yes I know that almost all shavings rob the soil of nitrogen but again, I never see a walnut tree in amongst other trees, generally I see walnut groves and I read once that walnut secrete an enzyne that kills other plants so not being a space shuttle engineer….........I personally refrain from using that wood for a chopping block.

Michigan Maple has been making “maple” butcher blocks for a long time, since 1881 http://www.mapleblock.com/ If you read the MSDS pdf file that they include in thier website then perhaps you might re-think ”That is why you don’t see maple ” blocks.

If you want to make a walnut cutting board….........what ever floats your boat!

Cheers

-- "Good artists borrow, great artists steal”…..Picasso

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PetVet

329 posts in 2119 days


#6 posted 2080 days ago

Hi again Roman. The MSDS sheet on wood dust is a general warning on the irritating effects of wood dust. Any species of wood dust will be treated as a foreign body by your immune system, and thus can be an irritant. Add to that that many woods do contain substances that are also known irritants, and you have a good combination for a reaction. This doesn’t necessarily make them toxic, ie red pepper is an irritant, but it isn’t toxic. Black walnut contains a substance called juglone that is in high concentrations in the roots and bark. It is this substance that is a natural herbicide and can be a bain to gardeners trying to plant around a black walnut tree. It can also be an irritant to your eyes and respiratory system. Juglone is not very water soluble, and not in high concentrations in the wood itself, so it is safe to use walnut in projects that will in contact with food.

My, my, we digress so from the subject of end grain cutting boards. Forgive us Brian!

-- Rich in Richmond -- Experience is something you don't get until just after you need it.

View gr8outdrsmn's profile

gr8outdrsmn

60 posts in 2085 days


#7 posted 2080 days ago

Wow, thanks for the great info guys. I will probably start out with the maple/walnut combo. Just as soon as I finish my Greenland Kayak Paddle. I can’t go any further on it until my rasp and drawknife come in Thursday. So, it’s just a waiting game haha.

-- Don't take life too seriously, you'll never get out alive.

View Garyb6's profile

Garyb6

306 posts in 2262 days


#8 posted 2080 days ago

Just to throw in a lesson I learned this past weekend. Be very careful if you put your end grain cutting boards through your planer. I had one of the blocks sticking up a little higher than the rest and the blade caught even though I was being very careful to only take a small cut. Anyway the board jammed and shot out backwards. The blade broke and even the bladeholder was bent. I will never run a cutting board through a planer again without some sanding first to make sure the blocks are even.

-- Garyb6, “True simplicity does not reveal the tremendous effort it requires.” - Somerset Maugham

View PeteMoss's profile

PeteMoss

206 posts in 2102 days


#9 posted 2080 days ago

I do run mine through a planer (taking very small bites) and it works okay, but like Garyb6 said you would need to be very careful and think through it beforehand. I actually broke, yes physically broke, my first Dewalt planer on one of these. I chunk broke loose and got sucked up between the blades and the “cast aluminum I guess” housing. It broke the housing on both ends where it bolts on. So, if you do, make sure the thing is glued really well, that it is relatively flat or even all over, and that you chamfer or round over the trailing edges to stop chipout, or it could very well self-destruct.

-- "Never measure......cut as many times as necessary." - PeteMoss

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NedB

658 posts in 2198 days


#10 posted 2072 days ago

A friend of mine suggested gluing sacrificial strips on the ends of cutting boards to deal with the tear-out issue. I didn’t and lost a bit of material to chip out, but will in the future. They can even be 2x material, just glue them on so that the planer ‘sees’ a normal board at the beginning and end of the cutting board. And of course, you have to take really light passes while planing end grain no matter what.

-- Ned - 2B1ASK1 http://nedswoodshop.blogspot.com

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