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Deft spray lacquer over Danish Oil???

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Forum topic by AandCstyle posted 12-14-2013 06:40 PM 5575 views 1 time favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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AandCstyle

2566 posts in 1718 days


12-14-2013 06:40 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question bubinga oak finishing

I am finishing a couple small boxes (10”x6”x4”) and used Danish oil to pop the grain on the bubinga and qswo. Does any know if I can safely use Deft lacquer over the oil without there being any adverse effects like crazing or whatever? I intend to let the oil dry for 3-4 days and I have a couple samples for test purposes, but thought that someone might know the answer off the top of their heads.

Also, I normally spray WB products so I have a box fan exhausting out a window. Does anyone know if I can safely have that running while I am spraying the Deft? The can says not, but I wonder if that is due to the corporate lawyers. I understand that spraying a lot of lacquer might cause an explosion, but this is such a small quantity I have to ask the question.

Thanks for any guidance.

-- Art


14 replies so far

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

3930 posts in 1954 days


#1 posted 12-14-2013 06:45 PM

Nitro lacquer has so many highly flammable components I would suggest you not run that fan while using it (unless that fan is classified explosion-proof. The solvents in lacquer are so hazardous I only spray it outside…which can be done in very cold temperatures with no ill effects. Never tried it over danish oil, so can’t help. I know the Danish oil has a varnish component, and it normally a bad idea to put lacquer over varnish. The solvents pretty much attack anything.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View Richforever's profile

Richforever

751 posts in 3181 days


#2 posted 12-14-2013 07:13 PM

On a recent project I used Deft brushing lacquer for the first time, and I love it. However, I had to move everything outdoors to apply it. I tried one board inside first. I had to use a respirator to re-enter the house; open all windows; have fans blowing all day in order to make the place usable. IT IS SMELLY!

I used it over a natural colored oil-based stain. In most of the big project, it worked well. In several places it wrinkled the finish, and I had to sand and re-do those. In other places it didn’t work at all, and I had to apply polyurethane. Couldn’t figure out why this happened.

-- Rich, Seattle, WA

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jumbojack

1667 posts in 2085 days


#3 posted 12-14-2013 07:20 PM

As long as your Danish oil is DRY, DRY, CURED AND DRY. You wont have a problem. I do this all the time. I love lacquer and rarely use anything else. As to venting the overspray through the window fan, I dont know. Out here in California, rare is the day when outside spraying can’t be done.

-- Made in America, with American made tools....Shopsmith

View MJCD's profile

MJCD

483 posts in 1832 days


#4 posted 12-14-2013 07:37 PM

We should all remember that Nitro-cellulose is the common agent between Laquers and Gun Powder. In olden days they referred to it as ‘gun cotton’.

-- Lead By Example; Make a Difference

View knotheadswoodshed's profile

knotheadswoodshed

202 posts in 1633 days


#5 posted 12-14-2013 08:35 PM

I use that technique all the time, this project is one example
http://lumberjocks.com/projects/67366

-- Randy - "I dont make mistakes, I make design change opportunities" www.knotheadswoodshed.com

View Finisherman's profile

Finisherman

227 posts in 1310 days


#6 posted 12-14-2013 11:33 PM

I think that you probably can use Deft lacquer over danish oil, provided that it has been given ample time to cure, ( two weeks would be ideal). To be safe, I’d consider applying a coat of dewaxed shellac between the oil and the lacquer.

View AandCstyle's profile

AandCstyle

2566 posts in 1718 days


#7 posted 12-15-2013 12:52 AM

Thanks to everyone for the quick feedback. I did spray the lacquer in my finishing room, but with both windows open and the lights and fan off. I decided that the risks weren’t worth the rewards. It looks great, but I think I will plan to use Target’s EM6000 in the future due to the safety concerns. I will make another sample board with the EM6000 and compare the look of the two products on the bubinga and qswo.

I applied the oil this AM and can let it cure until next Saturday, then I will have to make a decision. I can try the Deft on my samples Thursday which will be a week for them. The finishing room is usually about 60 degrees this time of year. If I bring the boxes into the main part of the house that is 70 degrees will that speed the curing process significantly?

Again, I greatly appreciate everyone’s help.

-- Art

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jumbojack

1667 posts in 2085 days


#8 posted 12-15-2013 02:45 AM

The lacquer in 60 degrees will cure off very quickly. At that temp you could apply several coats. An hour between coats is sufficient. Get three coats. Let it sit over night in the shop 60 is fine. Rub lightly with 400 grit and shoot another coat. Let it sit overnight and rub it out with 600 and some paste wax. you will be very pleased with the result.

-- Made in America, with American made tools....Shopsmith

View Jim Finn's profile

Jim Finn

2409 posts in 2383 days


#9 posted 12-15-2013 07:36 PM

I have sprayed Rust-oleum clear finish over cured tung oil with good results. Small items. Gives me a glossy finish if I sand a little between coats.

-- "You may have your PHD but I have my GED and my DD 214"

View AandCstyle's profile

AandCstyle

2566 posts in 1718 days


#10 posted 12-16-2013 01:51 AM

Jack, thanks for the finishing schedule. I don’t have the time on the current box to try it (I need to mail it tomorrow AM) , but I will use it on my next box which just needs final sanding and then finishing.

Jim, is the Rust-Oleum a lacquer product? I looked at their website, but didn’t find it to be user friendly.

-- Art

View tefinn's profile

tefinn

1222 posts in 1898 days


#11 posted 12-16-2013 03:00 AM

Art – It looks like your question has already been satifactorily answered, but just wanted to add, this is my go to finish on anything with highly figured wood (curley, tiger, birdseye etc.). The only problem you might have is not letting the Danish oil cure enough. I usually let it cure at least 3 days, but longer is always better, especially on open grained wood like oak.

-- Tom Finnigan - Measures? We don't need no stinking measures! - Hmm, maybe thats why my project pieces don't fit.

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AandCstyle

2566 posts in 1718 days


#12 posted 12-17-2013 02:55 AM

I’m going to try it on some samples Thursday and go from there.

-- Art

View Jim Finn's profile

Jim Finn

2409 posts in 2383 days


#13 posted 12-17-2013 03:33 AM

The Rust-oleum finish is an acrylic I think. Walmart sells it along with another brand of a product just like it but rust-olem has a better spray nozzle/pattern so I prefer it.

-- "You may have your PHD but I have my GED and my DD 214"

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AandCstyle

2566 posts in 1718 days


#14 posted 12-18-2013 12:29 AM

Thanks, Jim. I will look at Walmart sometime in January when it is relatively calm again. :)

-- Art

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