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Forum topic by Oosik posted 225 days ago 600 views 0 times favorited 10 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Oosik

62 posts in 282 days


225 days ago

Anyone have some pictures to show how they have hardwired some tools in? Plug-in seems easier to have a line ran and plug put in place. Is hardwiring any different, instead of a plug have a switch box in place?


10 replies so far

View tefinn's profile

tefinn

1199 posts in 1035 days


#1 posted 222 days ago

The only time there would ever be any need to hardwire a tool would be in a commercial shop. I’d never hardwire my tools. Think of the problems if you ever needed to work on or move the tools. Unless each had it’s own circuit you’ld have to shut down power to multiple tools. In any of the commercial or production shops I’ve worked, each tool had it’s own breaker box to shut down and lock out that tool so it could be workd on. Do you really want that kind of expense?

-- Tom Finnigan - Measures? We don't need no stinking measures! - Hmm, maybe thats why my project pieces don't fit.

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Oosik

62 posts in 282 days


#2 posted 222 days ago

So the saws that grizzly has labeled as hardwire are more for permanent shops?

The cord and plug models are meant for smaller shops then?

I was comparing the G0690 and G1023 and the wiring is a big factor for me.

View JJohnston's profile

JJohnston

1577 posts in 1890 days


#3 posted 222 days ago

I just looked at the downloadable manuals for those 2 saws, and they aren’t hardwire. Both call for plugs. I think the 0690 comes with one, but the 1023 doesn’t, but you just attach one to the end of the cord.

-- "Sorry I'm late. Somebody tampered with my brakes." "You should have been early, then."

View JustJoe's profile

JustJoe

1554 posts in 637 days


#4 posted 222 days ago

I’m not sure where/what specs you’re reading, but neither one of those saws requires hard-wiring. Both are single phase 220V. The G1023 is discontinued but the manual clearly states you need to provide your own plug to match your outlet – that’s not uncommon when buying larger power tools. And the G0690 has the same power requirements but comes with a cord already attached.
Edit: JJohnson typed faster than me. So sorry for beating a dead horse.

-- This Ad Space For Sale! Your Ad Here! Reach a targeted audience! Affordable Rates, easy financing! Contact an ad represenative today at JustJoe's Advertising Consortium.

View tefinn's profile

tefinn

1199 posts in 1035 days


#5 posted 222 days ago

What they’re saying is that the tool can be permanently hardwired if you want to do so. I’m saying IMO there is no need to for home or hobbiest use. You only need to have the proper voltage and outlet for the plug. For both of these saws 220v.

-- Tom Finnigan - Measures? We don't need no stinking measures! - Hmm, maybe thats why my project pieces don't fit.

View Shawn Masterson's profile

Shawn Masterson

1242 posts in 547 days


#6 posted 222 days ago

also if you hard wire a machine they need to have a disconnect.

View Oosik's profile

Oosik

62 posts in 282 days


#7 posted 222 days ago

Is it safe to add a plug? I was reading that sometimes that it is not safe but my knowledge with electrical work stops at replacing a light switch.

I was looking at the G1023RLWX 5hp too, sorry for not being more specific. I now notice the smaller models of that saw have a cord and plug according to the comparison charts.

Anything I should know about 220 vs 240?

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tefinn

1199 posts in 1035 days


#8 posted 222 days ago

220 and 240 are the same, the voltage numbers are “nominal”.

I checked the manual on Grizzly’s site. This saw does require it to be hardwired. That means you will need a 220 dedicated circuit with a disconnect between it and the saw. If your “knowledge with electrical work stops at replacing a light switch”, hire an electrician to do this work.

-- Tom Finnigan - Measures? We don't need no stinking measures! - Hmm, maybe thats why my project pieces don't fit.

View Shawn Masterson's profile

Shawn Masterson

1242 posts in 547 days


#9 posted 222 days ago

as long as the plug has the right amperage rating then yes you can put a plug on anything. I have a 10hp phase converter with the same 50 amp plug as my welder, so I can use the outlet for either one. as for 220 vs 240 anything ranging from 220 to 260 is the same the machines don’t know the difference. The fluctuation in voltage is caused by how far you are from the transformer.

View KS_Sparky's profile

KS_Sparky

22 posts in 221 days


#10 posted 221 days ago

If your home shop has a line to line voltage of anything close to 220V or 260V, you have some major issues. You don’t want to be more than 3% (5% max) away from your nominal voltage, which is actually 240V. 220V is an obsolete nominal voltage. If voltages stray too far, motors work harder and electronics can be damaged.

I’d put a cord cap on to match your 240v receptacle, but it wouldn’t be difficult to hardwire it, either. From an NEC standpoint, the cord can be considered the disconnect as long as the plug is accessible. If you hardwire it, the circuit breaker could be the disconnect if it is within sight (or lockable but this won’t apply in a residential panel). If it is an existing branch circuit you should make sure the ampacity is appropriate for your equipment. The equipment amperage shouldn’t be more than 80% of the breaker amperage.

-- apprentice Electrician, IBEW L.U. 226

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