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What is the origin of calling the tail vise a wagon vise?

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Forum topic by TopamaxSurvivor posted 12-11-2013 06:13 AM 1437 views 0 times favorited 9 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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TopamaxSurvivor

17677 posts in 3144 days


12-11-2013 06:13 AM

Topic tags/keywords: origin wagon vise name

Anyone know the origin of calling the tail vise a wagon vise?

-- Bob in WW ~ "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence


9 replies so far

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patron

13538 posts in 2809 days


#1 posted 12-11-2013 06:18 AM

maybe it was on the tail end
of a wagon
back in hopalong casidy’s day

-- david - only thru kindness can this world be whole . If we don't succeed we run the risk of failure. Dan Quayle

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shipwright

7175 posts in 2266 days


#2 posted 12-11-2013 06:20 AM

I’m no expert but I think they are two different things. As I understand it a wagon vice has a moving “wagon” within a fixed bench top. The wagon can hold dogs that work against fixed dogs. A tail vice is a moving part in and of itself, outside the fixed bench top.

-- Paul M ..............If God wanted us to have fiberglass boats he would have given us fibreglass trees. http://thecanadianschooloffrenchmarquetry.com/

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TopamaxSurvivor

17677 posts in 3144 days


#3 posted 12-11-2013 06:27 AM

David, Hoppy was a film star so I’m betting it predates him ;-) I thought it might have something to do with making wagons, but Goggle didn’t have a clue ;-(

Thanks Paul, That makes sense. Reading on LJ, I thought the terms were used interchangeably. They are probably 2 different animals and calling that part a wagon sounds reasonable;-)

-- Bob in WW ~ "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

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Loren

8315 posts in 3116 days


#4 posted 12-11-2013 07:08 AM

I figured it had to do with the handwheels makers
of wagon vise hardware are using… round like a wagon
wheel you know? Of course wheel diameters have
to be kept down so the wheel rim isn’t proud of
the bench top.

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Texcaster

1140 posts in 1142 days


#5 posted 12-11-2013 10:24 AM

The wagonwheel vise is sort of new to me. I haven’t paid much attention till I got a computer.

” tailvise ” has become generic for any vise with a traveling dog or stop fitted to the end of the bench. The trad. tailvise is a very different animal. It is so versatile my face vice only gets a look in when I edge plane.

http://www.toolsforworkingwood.com/store/blog/180/The%20Argument%20for%20a%20Traditional%20Tail%20Vise

-- Mama calls me Texcaster but my real name is Mr. Earl.

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stefang

15512 posts in 2802 days


#6 posted 12-11-2013 11:33 AM

I have been wondering about that myself Bob, but I didn’t think to ask. Paul’s explanation sounds very plausible because the wagon vise would run on a ‘carriage’ on the bench just as a regular wagon would run on a carriage.

I had a friend back in the 40’s in CulverCity where MGM was located. His father worked at MGM studios making models for car crashes and ship sinking scenes,etc.. We went to the movies every Saturday morning to see Hopalong Cassidy films. My friend always wanted to sit in the front row so he could see all the fake props like big boulders supported by 2×4s, Telephone lines, and a whole host of other things that shouldn’t have been in the film.

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.

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Picklehead

1019 posts in 1397 days


#7 posted 12-11-2013 12:27 PM

I’ll be sitting on this here stump, waiting for Joe.

-- You've got to be smarter than the tree.

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TopamaxSurvivor

17677 posts in 3144 days


#8 posted 12-12-2013 02:35 AM

Looks like Paul came up with the only plausible answer.

Miike, you guys must have been rich. We went to the movies once a year ;-) I did see Hoppy’s on TV.

-- Bob in WW ~ "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

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mafe

11172 posts in 2557 days


#9 posted 12-13-2013 03:24 PM

I bet on Paul.

-- MAD F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

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