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Oops! Clarification on question about rabbeting back of cabinet doors

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Forum topic by patchencindy posted 12-11-2013 03:41 AM 972 views 0 times favorited 7 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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patchencindy

32 posts in 1472 days


12-11-2013 03:41 AM

Topic tags/keywords: rabbet frame-and-panel doors cabinet doors overlay lipped

Sorry, but I accidentally call the rabbets on the backs of lipped overlay cabinet doors “dados.” Maybe this’ll make more sense:

I’m making slow but steady progress on a floor-to-ceiling kitchen cabinet, to the point where I’m working on the frame-and-panel doors. The cabinet has a face frame, and the doors (3/4” pine with birch plywood panels) are designed to partially overlay the frame. I had originally planned to cut a 3/8” rabbet on the back edges of the doors so they’d have a lip that caught on the frame, yet would also fit into the face frame opening, but now I’m wondering if there’s a purpose or advantage to doing that. Does anyone have thoughts on this?


7 replies so far

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Lifesaver2000

544 posts in 2577 days


#1 posted 12-11-2013 04:46 AM

One purpose is to create a more low-profile look for the door, in that it has only 3/8 visible instead of 3/4 outside the face frame. I personally like that look a lot compared to full overlay, but it depends on the project. I used the partial overlay on my bookcase gift project last year and I think it turned out looking really good. You can see it in my projects: http://lumberjocks.com/projects/75954

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patchencindy

32 posts in 1472 days


#2 posted 12-11-2013 02:05 PM

Nice piece, Lifesaver! And thanks for the response. I guess the choice is mainly aesthetic.

View CharlieM1958's profile

CharlieM1958

16242 posts in 3683 days


#3 posted 12-11-2013 02:20 PM

I agree with Lifesaver…. it’s a very nice look, but purely an aesthetic choice. It also ups the degree of difficulty a bit, so if you are new to cabinet-making you may want to take that into consideration.

-- Charlie M. "Woodworking - patience = firewood"

View Gene Howe's profile

Gene Howe

8254 posts in 2893 days


#4 posted 12-11-2013 02:36 PM

If everything is square, and you have a decently sized router table it’s not TOO difficult. IMHO, not worth the bother, though.

-- Gene 'The true soldier fights not because he hates what is in front of him, but because he loves what is behind him.' G. K. Chesterton

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patchencindy

32 posts in 1472 days


#5 posted 12-11-2013 05:44 PM

Well, the doors and face frame openings are square, but I must admit I’m a little reluctant at this point to risk destroying the doors with a slip of the router. I did the mortises and tenons and the grooves on the door frames for inserting the panels all on the table saw, and I guess I should’ve cut the rabbets at pre-assembly, too. Live ‘n’ learn. Thanks, all!

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Gene Howe

8254 posts in 2893 days


#6 posted 12-12-2013 03:01 PM

I can understand that, for sure.
Have you considered an ogee around the perimeter of the frames? that would effectively reduce the edge thickness….if that’s what you’re looking for. And, that can be done with a hand held router. A bit less cumbersome than using the table.

-- Gene 'The true soldier fights not because he hates what is in front of him, but because he loves what is behind him.' G. K. Chesterton

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patchencindy

32 posts in 1472 days


#7 posted 12-12-2013 04:06 PM

You’re right, Gene. That is an excellent compromise solution. Again, my hesitation is that I’m not as adept with the router as I am with the table saw. Would hate the botch the doors at this late stage. An ogee would also soften the look, which would be a good thing.

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