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Glue ups in the cold (0 degrees F outside today)?

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Forum topic by tengallonhat posted 12-07-2013 08:53 PM 1416 views 0 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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tengallonhat

79 posts in 1220 days


12-07-2013 08:53 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question

My workshop is in my garage. I have a heater, so before doing any glue ups today, I turned on the heater and let it warm up to 60F. It was probably about 30F before that. I figured that was enough to glue up some strips for cutting boards. The Titebond II was a little stiff coming out of the bottle and the wood was probably pretty cold now that I think about.

When I took the clamps off after an hour (earliest I could get back to it) it was still pretty wet and some of the boards I had glued up started separating again.

Will more clamp time help in the warmer garage? Is the glue ruined from being cold? Seems like if I wait until the squeeze out is reasonably dry then perhaps thats will solve the problem. Hoping I didn’t ruin this set of cutting board pieces. I guess if so, I can re-run them through the planer and start again.


11 replies so far

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CharlesA

3022 posts in 1262 days


#1 posted 12-07-2013 09:05 PM

Titebond says that below 47 degrees the glue will chalk and will not hold. I would assume that would mean that both glue and wood need to be above that. I’ve kept my garage above 47 for glue-ups and its worked fine. But if you’re heating up, I would think it would have to remain at that temp for awhile. I’ve been keeping my glue in the house since it has gotten cold and take it out to the garage for use.

-- "Man is the only animal which devours his own, for I can apply no milder term to the general prey of the rich on the poor." ~Thomas Jefferson

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tengallonhat

79 posts in 1220 days


#2 posted 12-07-2013 09:09 PM

If it chalks, is it done for? I’m guessing I may be starting over on these pieces…

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CharlesA

3022 posts in 1262 days


#3 posted 12-07-2013 09:12 PM

It is my understanding that you’d have to start the glue-up over with clean surfaces.

-- "Man is the only animal which devours his own, for I can apply no milder term to the general prey of the rich on the poor." ~Thomas Jefferson

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CharlesA

3022 posts in 1262 days


#4 posted 12-07-2013 09:15 PM

Another thread on this: http://lumberjocks.com/topics/53888

-- "Man is the only animal which devours his own, for I can apply no milder term to the general prey of the rich on the poor." ~Thomas Jefferson

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tengallonhat

79 posts in 1220 days


#5 posted 12-09-2013 07:23 PM

Thanks for the help. The resulting glue up is a bit chalky looking but a lot of the glue that squeezed out looks fine. So I’m hoping enough of the glue was able to set at a temp above 47F. So I’m going to try my luck and see how it holds up (even though I already know it’s probably no good).

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Kaleb the Swede

1731 posts in 1434 days


#6 posted 12-09-2013 07:25 PM

I can tell you that I have used titebond 2 with fine results in 32 weather. Maybe my unheated garage was a touch warmer than that, but not by much. I always leave mine in the clamps over night

-- Just trying to build something beautiful

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lumberjoe

2893 posts in 1713 days


#7 posted 12-09-2013 07:40 PM

According to titebond, their glue can take a few freeze cycles and still be good – however you need to apply it at close to 50 degrees.

We do all of our glue-ups and finishing in the basement in the winter. We bring the wood in and let it get up to temp before slapping glue on it and throwing it in clamps.

-- https://pinepointwoodworks.wordpress.com/

View Jim Jakosh's profile

Jim Jakosh

17172 posts in 2570 days


#8 posted 12-12-2013 12:04 AM

With water based glue, I would not try a glue up under 50 degrees just to be safe. I am not sure on the make up of Titebond, but I know that the water based glue we used on tops in the factory was scrap if it ever was frozen. They put freeze bulbs on each barrel and if that bulb froze, the bulb turned black. When we were teaching adhesives classes in our California plant, we thought they would not have to worry about that but we covered freeze bulbs any way. The night shift was having lots of adhesion problems and failures and one of the guys said their barrels had those bulbs turned black a lot. We checked with Purchasing and found out that their barrels sat in an unheated warehouse in Cleveland. We got that stopped immediately and rejected many barrels of glue!!
..............Jim

-- Jim Jakosh.....Practical Wood Products...........Learn something new every day!! Variety is the Spice of Life!!

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bondogaposis

4032 posts in 1816 days


#9 posted 12-12-2013 01:12 AM

You can do glue up at those temps but it really helps to use warm glue. The best advice is to bring the glue inside and only take it to the shop when your going to use it and not leave out there over night. Glue curing is a chemical reaction and like most chemical reactions it works better in a warm environment.

-- Bondo Gaposis

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GT350

352 posts in 1446 days


#10 posted 12-12-2013 02:25 AM

I have a cabinet I built for our bathroom and I glued it up in cold weather almost 20 years ago. I noticed chalking the next day but it is still holding together, although this is only the face frame. I make sure the temperature is up in my shop but I have the same question this week about how long it needs to be above 50 degrees.
Mike

View ChuckV's profile

ChuckV

2880 posts in 2992 days


#11 posted 12-12-2013 02:52 AM

I once asked technical support at Titebond the same question about temperature: how long should the glued-up piece be above the recommended temperature. The response was 24 hours. I ‘m sure that this is the conservative answer to try to cover all types of glue-ups.

My shop is unheated (and practically unheatable), so I do a lot of gluing in the house this time of year. I always bring the pieces to be glued into the house and let them warm up before starting the glue-up.

-- “Big man, pig man, ha ha, charade you are.” ― R. Waters

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