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Forum topic by Jerlac posted 12-07-2013 03:53 AM 587 views 0 times favorited 6 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Jerlac

98 posts in 372 days


12-07-2013 03:53 AM

I’m not shure what that kind of wood it is can anybody help me with that? I think it might be elm!


6 replies so far

View tefinn's profile

tefinn

1211 posts in 1102 days


#1 posted 12-07-2013 04:09 AM

From what I can see in the pics, I’d say probably red elm. Nice looking wood, whatever it is.

-- Tom Finnigan - Measures? We don't need no stinking measures! - Hmm, maybe thats why my project pieces don't fit.

View Monte Pittman's profile

Monte Pittman

14331 posts in 1003 days


#2 posted 12-07-2013 04:10 AM

Not sure about elm. Bark on elm comes of very easily. Looks kind of cherry-ish?

-- Mother Nature created it, I just assemble it.

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tefinn

1211 posts in 1102 days


#3 posted 12-07-2013 04:24 AM

The wood looks like it could be cherry, but that bark is totally wrong for cherry. I’m gonna stick with elm.

-- Tom Finnigan - Measures? We don't need no stinking measures! - Hmm, maybe thats why my project pieces don't fit.

View Loco's profile

Loco

210 posts in 414 days


#4 posted 12-07-2013 08:47 AM

You yankees.PPPPPPPPPPPppppplay ball !
Hickory

-- What day is it ? No matter. Ummmm What month is it ? No moron. I paid for a 2 x 6. That means Two inches by six inches. I want the rest of my wood.

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MacB

37 posts in 305 days


#5 posted 12-07-2013 12:18 PM

Looks like cherry with plenty of sap wood, though I don’t know how to match would bark with wood grain in identifying wood specie.

View WDHLT15's profile

WDHLT15

1140 posts in 1141 days


#6 posted 12-07-2013 12:45 PM

Looks like cherry to me to.

Elm is ring porous, that is, it has large pores in the beginning of the annual growth ring in the Spring, then the pores become small. This creates a lot of “grain” in the boards. Other ring porous hardwoods are oak, hickory, and ash. You can see the two sizes of pores easily in Loco’s pic of hickory.

Another feature of elm, in addition to the two distinct sizes of pores, is that the small pores in the summer part of the annual ring, called summer wood or latewood, are arranged in wavy bands. They look like squiggly lines. You will see this if you look at a clean slice of the end grain in an elm board. The wavy bands of latewood pores create a very beautiful grain pattern on the flat sawn face of a board.

Cherry is diffuse porous. All the pores in the annual growth ring are small and are the same size. Other examples are maple and yellow poplar. No where near as much “grain” on the boards.

The wood in the pic appears to be diffuse porous.

-- Danny Located in Perry, GA. Forester. Wood-Mizer LT15 Sawmill. Nyle L53 Dehumidification Kiln

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