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Forum topic by natenaaron posted 12-06-2013 04:56 PM 895 views 0 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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natenaaron

408 posts in 1263 days


12-06-2013 04:56 PM

I am looking for a source that explains what is involved in bending wider pieces of wood. Like 6-8 inch wide boards like in these dressers

http://www.poshtots.com/baby-furniture/baby-furniture/dressers/sobey-dresser/18/4279/1323/21863/poshproductdetail.aspx

This is not what I want to do but it shows it can be done. I am wondering if it is done with steam or with thin boards laminated and bent?


11 replies so far

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Bluepine38

3341 posts in 2551 days


#1 posted 12-06-2013 05:10 PM

Try viewing Dresser No. 1 by Lumberjock Brent & Lumberjock project 47511.

-- As ever, Gus-the 77 yr young apprentice carpenter

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natenaaron

408 posts in 1263 days


#2 posted 12-06-2013 05:13 PM

Cool, but is there a how too somewhere?

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JAAune

1646 posts in 1783 days


#3 posted 12-06-2013 05:14 PM

I’m guessing those projects were done using vacuum lamination and bending plywood. The overall shapes would be done with a cross lamination of veneers and bending ply then edge banded with 1/8” thick solid wood. After flushing the banding, a final layer of decorative veneer would be vacuum pressed on both sides of the piece.

If the pieces are really high end, the edging would be cut from steam bent pieces of wood so the grain would be continuous.

You can get started reading about the techniques over at Joe Woodworker’s. There’s a lot more to learn but that’s a good start.

Vacuum Pressing

-- See my work at http://remmertstudios.com and http://altaredesign.com

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Loren

8313 posts in 3114 days


#4 posted 12-06-2013 05:29 PM

The people that invented that style of work used vacuum
veneering.

If you want to be easy on yourself, use 3/8” wiggle
wood, bend and fasten it to a plywood form you’ll
remove later, then use glue and air staples, glue another
layer of wiggle wood on top. The glue will dry and
fix the shape. Then remove the form from the bottom
piece. Then you’ll have a 3/4” piece. From there
you can build it up thicker, veneer it or fill it and
paint.

You could do it with steam bending but you’d need
to know about metal working to make the rigs to
do the bends.

The FWW reprint books on veneering and bending
cover a wide range of scenarios with curved parts.

View rustfever's profile

rustfever

716 posts in 2776 days


#5 posted 12-06-2013 05:41 PM

Bending solid wood is a very do-able thing. However, only a simple curve is do-able for a first timer.

Compound bend is a very difficult for he who has limited resources and no training. Although I have bent a dozen or more projects with steam, I would never attempt the compound bend without a very good mentor and some more exotic tools than I posses.

Ira

-- Rustfever, Central California

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JustJoe

1554 posts in 1504 days


#6 posted 12-06-2013 05:42 PM

Fine Woodworking on Bending Wood
Taunton Press 1985
ISBN 0-918804-29-9

It takes material from their earlier magazines, you should be able to find a used version online for fairly cheap.

-- This Ad Space For Sale! Your Ad Here! Reach a targeted audience! Affordable Rates, easy financing! Contact an ad represenative today at JustJoe's Advertising Consortium.

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Earlextech

1159 posts in 2157 days


#7 posted 12-06-2013 06:23 PM

Bending plywood!

-- Sam Hamory - The project is never finished until its "Finished"!

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shipwright

7174 posts in 2264 days


#8 posted 12-06-2013 06:41 PM

You can easily veneer curves like this without a vacuum press.
Curved surfaces were being intricately veneered long before vacuum presses with hot hide glue and a veneer hammer. You can even hammer veneer after the piece is fully assembled.

As for steam bending this sort of profile, cupping would be a real problem. The easiest stock to bend is square in profile. The wider the piece gets for a given width, the greater the tendency will be for it to cup. I don’t have a lot of small bending experience with steam but I have a lot with bigger pieces.

-- Paul M ..............If God wanted us to have fiberglass boats he would have given us fibreglass trees. http://thecanadianschooloffrenchmarquetry.com/

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natenaaron

408 posts in 1263 days


#9 posted 12-06-2013 07:47 PM

Sam, how did you get the plywood to stay in that shape?

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Earlextech

1159 posts in 2157 days


#10 posted 12-06-2013 07:53 PM

Pretty much the way Loren described above. Two peices of 1/4” bending ply, glued together on a form.

-- Sam Hamory - The project is never finished until its "Finished"!

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natenaaron

408 posts in 1263 days


#11 posted 12-06-2013 09:59 PM

SO it has to be two pieces to hold its shap. Got it. It is like skinny bent laminations.

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