LumberJocks

Large picture frame - what glass or plastic to use?

  • Advertise with us

« back to Designing Woodworking Projects forum

Forum topic by firefighterontheside posted 12-04-2013 04:27 PM 2605 views 0 times favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View firefighterontheside's profile

firefighterontheside

13487 posts in 1321 days


12-04-2013 04:27 PM

I have been asked to make a picture frame for a poster that is 34” by 68” and I’m not sure I want to use a piece of glass that large. Does anyone have any recommendation for another glass type product that would work and where to get it. Thanks.

-- Bill M. "People change, walnut doesn't" by Gene.


12 replies so far

View verdesardog's profile

verdesardog

137 posts in 2076 days


#1 posted 12-04-2013 04:31 PM

It depends on the quality the customer wants. There is nothing wrong with glass that size, yuou can get plexi or acrilic at big box stores also…I think glass looks best.

-- .. heyoka ..

View firefighterontheside's profile

firefighterontheside

13487 posts in 1321 days


#2 posted 12-04-2013 04:53 PM

I did just find that I can get acrylic at lowes in that size. Never really worked with it. The customer was worried about having such a large piece of glass hanging on the wall and the weight of it hanging on the wall. I’ll check with a glass supplier and see how much it would weigh and cost. Thanks for the reply.

-- Bill M. "People change, walnut doesn't" by Gene.

View MrRon's profile

MrRon

3926 posts in 2708 days


#3 posted 12-04-2013 05:11 PM

Glass would be ok as long as the frame is strong enough. If the frame is on the “flimsy” side, use acrylic.

View firefighterontheside's profile

firefighterontheside

13487 posts in 1321 days


#4 posted 12-04-2013 05:37 PM

I would say I will make the frame pretty stout. I plan to use a 1/4” plywood back set into a rabbet on the back side of the frame. That way I can sort of sandwich the poster between the back and the glass to make it flat. Not sure of what I’ll use for the actual frame. I’m thinking of making it rail and stile as opposed to mitered to make sure it is strong.

-- Bill M. "People change, walnut doesn't" by Gene.

View PaulDoug's profile

PaulDoug

1094 posts in 1168 days


#5 posted 12-04-2013 06:42 PM

The main problem with plexiglass or acrylic is it scratches very easily. Just dusting it can leave scratches, least that is what I have found.

-- “We all die. The goal isn't to live forever; the goal is to create something that will.” - Chuck Palahniuk

View bigblockyeti's profile (online now)

bigblockyeti

3668 posts in 1185 days


#6 posted 12-04-2013 06:51 PM

I’m trying to figure out what to use for eight removable windows for my screened in porch and everyone I’ve spoken with says that 1/8” tempered glass is the way to go, not too heavy, flat, strong, scratch resistant and safe if it were to somehow break. The quotes I received for a piece 40” x 60” was between $75 and $115 each.

View albachippie's profile

albachippie

758 posts in 2500 days


#7 posted 12-04-2013 06:53 PM

I would agree with PaulDoug. Plexi (Perspex this side of the pond!)is a great alternative, and I use it all the time in frames. BUT, it does scratch incredibly easily, and the dust sticks to it like sh** to a blanket! The static is a nightmare. Picture glass, usually 2 or 3mm, is inherintly brittle. I guess you could put a 4mm laminated sheet into it. Seems counter intuitive, but, although this would make it a bit heavier, it would mean that it was stronger, and if it did break, would shatter instead of splinter, thus being a lot safer. Just my tuppenceworth!

Cheers, Garry

-- Garry fae Bonnie Scotland - https://www.facebook.com/pages/Garry-Macdonald-Woodwork/425518554215355?ref=hl

View firefighterontheside's profile

firefighterontheside

13487 posts in 1321 days


#8 posted 12-04-2013 07:06 PM

I’m not against using real glass, but the customer mentioned that he did not want to spend a ton of money on a poster. I can tell him the prices for both, the weights of both and pros and cons and let him decide. tempered glass would definitely be great. We often have to break car windows out prior to using the jaws to open the doors. It’s not as easy as you might think. Once we had a car upside down in a creek and I went down to see if anyone was in it. I tried to kick the glass with my heavy steel toed boots and it would not break. We carry little punches though that are spring loaded and do great at breaking the glass.

-- Bill M. "People change, walnut doesn't" by Gene.

View albachippie's profile

albachippie

758 posts in 2500 days


#9 posted 12-04-2013 07:11 PM

Tempered is a strong glass. Laminated is a little different. Two sheets of glass glued together, with a micro film of plastic sandwiched between. A bit lighter than tempered.

I was just about to ask if you were a firefighter, then I read your tag name and signature….. duh!

-- Garry fae Bonnie Scotland - https://www.facebook.com/pages/Garry-Macdonald-Woodwork/425518554215355?ref=hl

View jack1's profile

jack1

2057 posts in 3492 days


#10 posted 12-04-2013 09:35 PM

I use tempered glass if it’ll get lots of use and especially if it’s lower than your knees for obvious reasons. Annealed glass is also pretty tough and less than tempered.
.

-- jack -- ...measure once, curse twice!

View AandCstyle's profile

AandCstyle

2572 posts in 1722 days


#11 posted 12-05-2013 12:57 AM

One thing that I learned the hard way is to use non-glare glass, if you end up using glass. I don’t know if this is an issue or not with the plastics. HTH

-- Art

View jack1's profile

jack1

2057 posts in 3492 days


#12 posted 12-05-2013 01:30 AM

Non-glare is great if the picture is going to get direct sun or artificial light that can’t be adjusted. Many artists insist on regular glass since non-glare can mask or modify some mediums.
My first ex was a painter, photographer, lithographer and she would insist you move the piece if you got glare, not cover her work! ;0)

-- jack -- ...measure once, curse twice!

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com