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Forum topic by JustJoe posted 232 days ago 721 views 0 times favorited 20 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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JustJoe

1554 posts in 635 days


232 days ago

I feel like I’ve asked this before but forgotten the answer. So here it is again. This time I promise to write it down.
I have a few of these bits. They are some sort or drill bit, or maybe milling bit or router bit.
I think they are carbide because they are much heavier than regular drill bits of the same size. The finish on them is also much better than any drill bit I’ve ever had. The shank is very shiny and smooth and then where the flutes start it is a grayer color but still incredibly smooth like it was precision ground.
This one is 1/4” thick, 2.75” long.
It’s the flutes that are unique. There are two of them, directly opposite each other and perfectly straight, no twist.
Any ideas?
Thanks
Joe

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20 replies so far

View darthford's profile

darthford

532 posts in 521 days


#1 posted 232 days ago

Reamer?

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JustJoe

1554 posts in 635 days


#2 posted 232 days ago

No I’ve got a bajillion reamers I’ve pulled out of machinist chests. They have many more flutes that are sharp on both sides.

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View racerglen's profile

racerglen

2254 posts in 1378 days


#3 posted 232 days ago

CNC bits ?

-- Glen, Vernon B.C. Canada

View yag113's profile

yag113

28 posts in 264 days


#4 posted 232 days ago

I have some too and would also like to know. What are CNC bits?

-- Shore Wildlife Rehab

View Kaleb the Swede's profile

Kaleb the Swede

1093 posts in 566 days


#5 posted 232 days ago

Is it one of those router bits meant for a drill press? I don’t know, I saw that in an old woodworking book in the library. I could be totally wrong though

-- Just trying to build something beautiful

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JustJoe

1554 posts in 635 days


#6 posted 232 days ago

I think I found them:
http://www.grainger.com/product/CHICAGO-LATROBE-Straight-Stub-Drill-6WUG3?s_pp=false

They aren’t cheap that’s for sure, but even reading the description I don’t understand why I’d use these instead of a regular bit:

“Non-Ferrous Material, Hardened Material, Stainless Steel And Normally Limited To 2 x Diameter Drilling Depths”

I’m guessing non-ferrous is plastic or brass/aluminum? I’ve got bits made for aluminum and they are the opposite – twisted flutes with even more of a twist than a normal bit.
And limited to 2x diameter means the 1/4” bit can only go down 1/2”? That’s not a lot for $35 bucks apiece.

-- This Ad Space For Sale! Your Ad Here! Reach a targeted audience! Affordable Rates, easy financing! Contact an ad represenative today at JustJoe's Advertising Consortium.

View racerglen's profile

racerglen

2254 posts in 1378 days


#7 posted 232 days ago

Yag, CNC bits are for those computer operated rigs, milling and carving machines.
Joe those are some very pricey little bits alright ! Maybe somebody else can step up with a better idea of why ?

-- Glen, Vernon B.C. Canada

View bandit571's profile

bandit571

6642 posts in 1280 days


#8 posted 232 days ago

Tip looks almost like a “Star” drill. Maybe a small hole for a tapcon? Maybe chuck it into a hammer drill, and drill some concrete? The old star drills were quite long, and used with a 3 pound drilling hammer. Thank God, Hilti came along….

-- A Planer? I'M the planer, this is what I use

View Bluepine38's profile

Bluepine38

2876 posts in 1682 days


#9 posted 232 days ago

I can see the solid carbide for stainless steel, the bit would stay sharp for a long time, and if you ever tried
to drill stainless with a dull bit, only to harden it and make it almost impossible to drill you would understand.
Being carbide they are also brittle and not for amateur use unless the amateur has way more money than
sense. Never knew they existed, now I have one more wonderful piece of knowledge to misfile.

-- As ever, Gus-the 75 yr young apprentice carpenter

View JustJoe's profile

JustJoe

1554 posts in 635 days


#10 posted 232 days ago

I’ve worked with stainless steel on the lathe, but haven’t drilled it much. I’ll throw these in a drawer with a note saying what they’re for. I’ll probably never use them but at least my heirs won’t be guessing when they have to wade through the piles-o-cr@p I call my tool collection.

thanks
Joe

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View woodsmithshop's profile

woodsmithshop

1103 posts in 2143 days


#11 posted 231 days ago

we used to use these for drilling concrete, it is arm and hammer powered, we called it a star drill

-- Smitty!!!

View REO's profile

REO

577 posts in 671 days


#12 posted 231 days ago

two uses I know of are for PC board, G10,G3, LE and other composite drilling. the other is drilling a pierced hole to final size. the edge of a pierced hole is rolled in on one edge and micro fractured on the other, because there is no “lip” on the flute it makes it much more durable and can handle the work hardening and drill thin material without the typical pointy deformed holes. these have to be used in a rigid set up not a hand drill. they can be used to drill holes in hardened materials like tool handles as well. don’t pound on it with a hammer! although they are hard they will shatter somewhat easily!

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JustJoe

1554 posts in 635 days


#13 posted 231 days ago

Thanks for more info REO. Smitty they might look like star-drills from the side but they definitely aren’t when you look at them from the business end. They only have two flutes, and those flutes are razor sharp. From the bottom it looks like two triangles with one piont from each touching the other. A star-bit for a hammer-drill looks like a cross on the bottom.

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PurpLev

8476 posts in 2246 days


#14 posted 231 days ago

this is a straight drill similar to a d-bit. it is used in higher precision applications and when you don’t want the materials being drilled to be pulled by the twist-drill-bits. needs more attention as it can clog more easily than a twist drill – this is not your everyday drill bit for random projects.

-- ㊍ When in doubt - There is no doubt - Go the safer route.

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JustJoe

1554 posts in 635 days


#15 posted 231 days ago

I’m thinking these bits probably belong over in the “machinist” pile then, and not in the woodworking stuff.

-- This Ad Space For Sale! Your Ad Here! Reach a targeted audience! Affordable Rates, easy financing! Contact an ad represenative today at JustJoe's Advertising Consortium.

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