LumberJocks

box veneering

  • Advertise with us

« back to Woodworking Skill Share forum

Forum topic by adam2 posted 12-04-2013 01:54 AM 1733 views 0 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View adam2's profile

adam2

18 posts in 2079 days


12-04-2013 01:54 AM

I do a lot of box making and I have started to use veneer. I was wondering when I use a plywood or mdf core, and I veneer the inside of the box before cutting the pieces to size. Should I veneer the outside at the same time with a cheap veneer to prevent warping. Then after the box is made do the finish veneer over the cheap veneer. Or can I just veneer the inside, make the box and then do the finish veneer on the outside?


11 replies so far

View JAAune's profile

JAAune

1646 posts in 1783 days


#1 posted 12-04-2013 02:04 AM

You can do it either way provided that you end up with a balanced panel when everything is completed. In other words, you want the same number of veneer layers on the inside as on the outside and they should be oriented in the same direction.

If veneering over plywood, be sure to put your face veneers cross-grain to the veneer on the plywood. If you don’t alternate the orientation of the grain you’ll end up with what’s essentially a single layer of wood on the outside 1/16” thick or thicker. The thicker you get, the more likely there will be issues down the road with problems like micro fractures in the finish.

-- See my work at http://remmertstudios.com and http://altaredesign.com

View WibblyPig's profile

WibblyPig

168 posts in 2740 days


#2 posted 12-04-2013 02:06 AM

The general rule of thumb is an odd number of plys. One on the inside, one on the outside to counteract it. Personally, I’ve done it both with and without and never had a problem either way.

However, I can’t see an easy way of veneering a box once it’s built. I would make the pieces, veneer both sides and then mill and assemble it.

My personal substrate preference is Baltic Birch plywood.

-- Steve, Webster Groves, MO "A society grows great when old men plant trees whose shade they know they shall never sit in."

View JAAune's profile

JAAune

1646 posts in 1783 days


#3 posted 12-04-2013 02:12 AM

Thanks to Wibbly for bringing up the odd number of plies. I forgot to mention that and it is important. You basically want to avoid having a glue line right in the middle of the board because it is in the neutral position (subject equally to tension in opposite directions) so it won’t add any strength to your lamination.

Since you aren’t actually doing a full lamination this won’t apply to you but it’s good to know just in case.

-- See my work at http://remmertstudios.com and http://altaredesign.com

View jumbojack's profile

jumbojack

1667 posts in 2090 days


#4 posted 12-04-2013 02:24 AM

The size of most boxes make this all moot. Veneer the inside pieces of your box. Do the outside after the build. Your box will be fine. Now if you are doing large panels say for a blanket chest you may need to take some of the precautions mentioned above.

-- Made in America, with American made tools....Shopsmith

View jumbojack's profile

jumbojack

1667 posts in 2090 days


#5 posted 12-04-2013 03:05 AM

just looked at your gallery. Nice stuff.

-- Made in America, with American made tools....Shopsmith

View adam2's profile

adam2

18 posts in 2079 days


#6 posted 12-04-2013 09:34 PM

Thanks for all the input guys. JAAune I hade not thought of running the veneer grain 90 degrees to the grain on the substrate. I am going to give that a try on my next project.

WibblyPig,
I do a lot of complete grain match around the entire box. In those cases I build the main box, then do the outside veneer, then add any other details.

jumbojack,
Thanks for the complements. You have some cool projects as well. how long have you been making boxes? I also wanted to ask if you have tried to sell them?

View robert triplett's profile

robert triplett

1566 posts in 2571 days


#7 posted 12-05-2013 12:57 AM

I read all of this with a lot of interest because I have been buying veneer with the idea of trying it on some box tops. I hope the small size of the tops will let me avoid a large learning curve!

-- Robert, so much inspiration here, and now time to work!!!

View Glen Peterson's profile

Glen Peterson

556 posts in 2522 days


#8 posted 12-09-2013 09:29 PM

I find veneer is fun and not too difficult. I have a big vac bag and vac press but it’s overkill for boxes. I’ve used traditional hide glue, yellow glue, Old Brown Glue, and most recently urea formaldehyde glue. I first used veneer in a class with Ian Kirby. We were using yellow glue and an old clothes iron (without water) to speed up the curing process. The folks are right about veneering both sides. One side only can warp a board.
Cheers

-- Glen

View bondogaposis's profile (online now)

bondogaposis

4036 posts in 1817 days


#9 posted 12-09-2013 10:50 PM

Or can I just veneer the inside, make the box and then do the finish veneer on the outside?

That is the way I would do it to keep it balanced in the end. I will say that I have not done an awful lot of veneer work, just small boxes and clocks and such.

-- Bondo Gaposis

View BHolcombe's profile

BHolcombe

144 posts in 1542 days


#10 posted 12-28-2013 03:09 PM

I personally prefer to veneer the panels before making the box.

View WibblyPig's profile

WibblyPig

168 posts in 2740 days


#11 posted 12-28-2013 03:45 PM

robert triplett, make yourself a bottle jack press. Make it so it can handle 24”x24” and it will take you quite a while to outgrow it. Whatever you do, DON’T USE CONTACT CEMENT!!! There’s cold press veneer glue, yellow glue, hide glue and a number of others.

The good thing about starting with box tops is that if you don’t like it, you can do another without having ruined the whole box.

-- Steve, Webster Groves, MO "A society grows great when old men plant trees whose shade they know they shall never sit in."

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com